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So we have an XSD type in the form:

<xs:complexType name="Foo">
    <xs:all>
        <xs:element name="Bars">
            <xs:complexType>
                <xs:sequence>
                    <xs:element name="Bar" type="barType" maxOccurs="unbounded"/>
                </xs:sequence>
            </xs:complexType>
        </xs:element>
    </xs:all>
</xs:complexType>    

to represent XML:

<Foo>
    <!-- Elements snipped for brevity-->
    <Bars>
        <Bar>
            <!-- Bar Element -->
        </Bar>
    </Bars>
</Foo>

xjc produces almost correct results. The only annoying thing is that "Bars" is created as an inner class which stores a list of Bars. Is there anyway to have Bars be a List in Foo while still retaining the XML above?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

Another way would be to drop the surrounding <bars> element, the XML does not look so nice anymore, but it would make the java code easier to read. Together with xjc's simple binding (see http://jaxb.java.net/nonav/jaxb20-fcs/docs/vendorCustomizations.html) it will produce quite pretty and usefull java code.

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When you define Bars as a complex type, Bars will be generated as separated class. Like this I find schema also easier to read. Bars will not be List in Foo unless you change maxOccurs to a value higher than 1 - you cannot do this on xs:all but you can use xs:sequence.

...
    <xs:complexType name="Foo">
        <xs:all>
            <xs:element name="Bars" type="Bars" />
        </xs:all>
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType name="Bars">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element name="Bar" type="barType" maxOccurs="unbounded" />
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>
...

After running xjc: Foo.java:

    ...
    @XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
    @XmlType(name = "Foo", propOrder = {

    })
    public class Foo {

        @XmlElement(name = "Bars", required = true)
        protected Bars bars;

        public Bars getBars() {
            return bars;
        }

        public void setBars(Bars value) {
            this.bars = value;
        }
    }

Bars.java:

    ...
    @XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
    @XmlType(name = "Bars", propOrder = {
        "bar"
    })
    public class Bars {

        @XmlElement(name = "Bar", required = true)
        protected List<String> bar;

        ...
    }

With xs:seqence to get the list of Bars (maxOccurs="unbounded"): XSD:

    ...
    <xs:complexType name="Foo">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element name="Bars" type="Bars" maxOccurs="unbounded" />
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType name="Bars">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element name="Bar" type="barType" maxOccurs="unbounded" />
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>
    ...

Foo.java:

...
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
@XmlType(name = "Foo", propOrder = {
    "bars"
})
public class Foo {

    @XmlElement(name = "Bars", required = true)
    protected List<Bars> bars;

    public List<Bars> getBars() {
        if (bars == null) {
            bars = new ArrayList<Bars>();
        }
        return this.bars;
    }
}
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Bjarne Hansen's plugin for xjc (https://github.com/dmak/jaxb-xew-plugin) would allow you to stay with "Bars" enclosing element, generating convenient @XmlElementWrapper(name="Bars") annotation.

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1  
As mentioned in a few other posts/comments on this topic, that plugin doesn't seem to work with the recent xjc. I've been banging my head on this for two days now. Also I like to use xjc from the command line, and this plugin more or less requires you to write an ant target, as well as find where the heck the jaxb.jar is, etc. –  Pierre D Mar 22 '12 at 18:07

You could do the following:

package example;

import java.util.List;

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElement;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlElementWrapper;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlRootElement;

@XmlRootElement(name="Foo")
public class Foo {

    private List<Bar> bar;

    public List<Bar> getBar() {
        return bar;
    }

    @XmlElementWrapper(name="Bars")
    @XmlElement(name="Bar")
    public void setBar(List<Bar> bar) {
        this.bar = bar;
    }

}

and

package example;

public class Bar {

}

Then you can process your XML using the following code;

package example;

import java.io.File;

import javax.xml.bind.JAXBContext;
import javax.xml.bind.Marshaller;
import javax.xml.bind.Unmarshaller;

public class Demo {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(Foo.class);

        Unmarshaller unmarshaller = jc.createUnmarshaller();
        Foo foo = (Foo) unmarshaller.unmarshal(new File("src/forum128/input.xml"));

        Marshaller marshaller = jc.createMarshaller();
        marshaller.setProperty(Marshaller.JAXB_FORMATTED_OUTPUT, true);
        marshaller.marshal(foo, System.out);
    }
}
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Unfortunately I'm trying to go from the xsd to the java files. –  Jim Feb 1 '11 at 14:47
    
I was looking for something like this in my question here. Can the @XmlElementWrapper annotation be generated using XJC? I would prefer not manually modifying generated code... –  Lukas Eder Feb 11 '12 at 14:24
    
Blaise: first of all, thank you so much for all your posts as well as your blog (for example this post which also refers to this). Always super-clear and to the point. I too am looking for a simple solution (i.e. not involving an xjc plugin) that would let us just generate the @XmlElementWrapper by xjc. It would be very neat to be able to declare an element to be "void" or "pass-through" in the .xsd, i.e. all of its sub-elements would automatically be contained by the parent (or higher if the parent also has that flag). –  Pierre D Mar 22 '12 at 18:27
    
@PierreD - I'm happy to hear you are finding the information useful. Generating an @XmlElementWrapper is probably one of the most requested features, but as of today does require an xjc-plugin. –  Blaise Doughan Mar 22 '12 at 20:24

Maybe below sample helps.

XML Schema

 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
    <xs:schema version="1.0" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">

      <xs:complexType name="test">
        <xs:sequence>
          <xs:element name="dataList" type="xs:string" nillable="true" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded"/>
          <xs:element name="str" type="xs:string" minOccurs="0"/>
        </xs:sequence>
      </xs:complexType>
    </xs:schema>

Java class :

public class Test {

    protected List<String> dataList;
    protected String str;
    public List<String> getDataList() {
        if (dataList == null) {
            dataList = new ArrayList<String>();
        }
        return this.dataList;
    }

    public String getStr() {
        return str;
    }

    public void setStr(String value) {
        this.str = value;
    }

}

EDIT 1:

You can reverse engineer from java code to xsd. in JAVA_HOME/bin there is schemagen executable.

Give your java code and it will create the XSD schema for you using your java class.

see this link

schemagen myObj1.java myObj2.java
share|improve this answer
    
This xsd describes xml like <Foo><bars><item/></bars><bars><item/></bars></Foo> (I think) which is not quite what I need. –  Jim Feb 2 '11 at 10:17
    
@Jim See my edit above. –  fmucar Feb 2 '11 at 15:11

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