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I am looking for a clear explanation of what the MERGE statement in Oracle really does.

Here is what I am after:

MERGE INTO (target_table) t
USING (source_view) s
   ON (join condition)
 WHEN MATCHED THEN UPDATE SET col1 = val1 [, ...]
 WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN INSERT (col1 [, ...]) VALUES ( val1 [, ...])
  • what kind of join is performed? I think it is full outer join, am I right?
  • regarding the WHEN MATCHED part: what happens when a row from t matches multiple rows from s?
  • regarding the WHEN NOT MATCHED part I believe it means “when a row in s has no correspondence in t”. Am I right?

Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

what kind of join is performed? I think it is full outer join, am I right?

No, it's a regular outer join. The query needs to know when there are rows in the target table that are also in the source table and when there are records in the source table that are not in the target table. Since the query doesn't need to respond to rows that are in the target table but are not in the source table, it doesn't need the outer join to go both ways.

However, the outer join will not be performed if there is no not matched clause (which is perfectly valid). The optimizer is smart enough to know that in that case, an inner join is sufficient.

regarding the WHEN MATCHED part: what happens when a row from t matches multiple rows from s?

When there are multiple matches, the update is performed for each match. This means that whichever update comes last will be the one written in the commit. There's no way to dictate an order, so in this case the source of the update is effectively random (from the set of matches).

As @ Vincent Malgrat pointed out, this was incorrect. It seems that Oracle will produce an "ORA-40926: unable to get a stable set of rows in the source table" error if there are multiple matches.

regarding the WHEN NOT MATCHED part I believe it means “when a row in s has no correspondence in t”. Am I right?

That is correct.

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Thank you, this is exactly what I wanted to know. I suppose *regular outer join` means t right join s and not t left join s? –  Benoit Feb 1 '11 at 15:10
    
Regarding the multiple matches, the doc specificaly mentions that MERGE is a deterministic statement. That is, you cannot update the same row of the target table multiple times in the same MERGE statement. When the update is ambiguous, Oracle will raise an ORA-30926 out of precaution –  Vincent Malgrat Feb 1 '11 at 15:21
    
@Benoit: That is correct. If you were writing a similar query yourself, you'd use right join or left join, from the optimizer's point of view, either is a hash join outer (typically). –  Allan Feb 1 '11 at 15:23

pretty good article here http://www.oracle-developer.net/display.php?id=203

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Thank you. Actually it was insightful but did not address my questions specifically. –  Benoit Feb 1 '11 at 15:10

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