Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two functions:

void prepare() and void finish() that will be called sequentially like:

prepare();
<do something>;
finish(); 
... 
prepare(); 
<do something>; 
finish();

I want to make a simple assertion to simply test that they are in fact being called this way and that they aren't being called concurrently or out-of-order in the application.

This application is a single-threaded application. This is a simple development/testing sanity check to make sure that these functions are being called in-order and that for whatever reason, they aren't being called concurrently. Furthermore, these assertions/sanity checks should be omitted from production code as performance is crucial!

would a simple assert() like this work best?

int test = 0;

void prepare() {
   assert(++test == 1);

   .
   .
   .
}

void finish() {
    assert(--test == 0);

    .
    .
    .
}
share|improve this question
    
should volatile be used for the int test to mitigate any kind of caching? –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 15:50
    
Are there no comments on the int test being qualified as volatile? The way it is now, couldn't test be cached in a register? –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 15:53
    
@Fred Nurk can you please elaborate? This particular process doesn't involve the instantiation of new objects, it's simply just a process that occurs within the application. –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 16:04
    
@chriskirk: Moved to an answer. –  Fred Nurk Feb 1 '11 at 16:06
2  
Re: volatile -- please read this, but ignore (or at least take with a brick of salt) the accepted answer, as it implies that volatile is useful for multithreaded programming. But it is not. stackoverflow.com/questions/4557979/… –  John Dibling Feb 1 '11 at 16:07
show 1 more comment

6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code is OK, unless you need to allow nesting prepare and finish calls.

If nesting is not allowed, you could use a bool instead of an int:

bool locked = false;;

void prepare() {
    assert( ! locked );
    locked = true;
    ...
}

void finish() {
    assert( locked );
    locked = false;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good point, actually they won't be nested. –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 15:52
    
Well, I think it would be nicer to have it all in a single assert to eliminate the need of having #if NDEBUG. What do you think? –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 15:55
    
^^ ^^ ^^ –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 15:58
    
@chriskirk: You can still do it: assert( (locked=!locked)==true ); in prepare and assert( (locked=!locked)==false );` in finish. Anyway I'd prefer using #if NDEBUG, in my opinion it's easier to understand the code this way, but it's just a matter of taste. I think that in most circumstances using a bool could cost less than using an int, plus the code logic is clearer, in my opinion. –  peoro Feb 1 '11 at 16:01
    
I'm accepting this answer for its simplicity. –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 16:34
add comment

You might want to change

int test = 0;

to

#ifndef NDEBUG
int test = 0;
#endif

to satisfy your requirement that "any code relating to this test should be omitted from production".

share|improve this answer
    
Making test a static int is probably enough to get it optimized away. –  larsmans Feb 1 '11 at 15:58
    
@larsmans: possibly. And some compilers might complain if it is never used. –  Raedwald Feb 1 '11 at 17:06
    
true. –  larsmans Feb 1 '11 at 17:40
add comment

you probably want:

int test = 0;

void prepare() {
    // enter critical section
    assert(test++ == 0);

    .
    .
    .
    // leave critical section 
}

void finish() {
    // enter critical section
    assert(--test == 0);

    .
    .
    .
    // leave critical section
}
share|improve this answer
    
that does seem a bit more clear and elegant. –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 15:53
    
This is a conventional c++ reference counting idiom. But it doesn't sove the concurrency problem. What platform are you on? –  ThomasMcLeod Feb 1 '11 at 15:58
    
this exercise is being done to just check that prepare() and finish() are being called properly. It's a single threaded app on 64-bit Linux using gcc 4.1.2. –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 16:05
    
@chris, if it's single threaded, then you do not need thread synchronization. Please edit your question to remove references to concurrency, and remove the concurrency and reentrancy tags. –  ThomasMcLeod Feb 1 '11 at 16:12
add comment

There's a race condition here: two concurrent instances of prepare might take the value of test at the same time, then both increment it in a register to both obtain 1, then do the comparison to get true.

Making it volatile is not going to help. Instead, you should put a mutex on test, like so:

boost::mutex mtx;
int test = 0;

void prepare()
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_try_lock lock(&mtx);
    assert(lock.owns_lock());
    assert(test++ == 0);
    // ...
}

void finish()
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_try_lock lock(&mtx);
    assert(lock.owns_lock());
    assert(--test == 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does volatile help this? –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 15:58
    
@chriskirk No it doesn't. –  Mark B Feb 1 '11 at 16:00
    
@chriskirk: No, for reasons outlined here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2484980/… –  larsmans Feb 1 '11 at 16:00
    
Hum... I don't think this program is a multi-threaded one. Is it? –  peoro Feb 1 '11 at 16:02
1  
This application is not supposed to be concurrent. This routine is not suppose to support concurrency or re-entrancy. This whole post is asking what the best way to assert() this would be in development/testing mode (not in production). Just like a basic sanity check while developing. –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 16:24
show 7 more comments

If you put <do something>; into a class you can reduce the need for a check at all:

Just have the constructor call prepare and the destructor call finish. Then it's automatically enforced that they're called appropriately.

Note that concurrency and nesting issues still apply: If you want to prevent nesting then you'd still need some sort of global state (static class member?) to keep track of that, and if it's used in more than one thread access to that counter would need to be mutex protected.

Also note that you could also make private operator new/delete to prevent someone from creating one on the heap and not destroying it.

share|improve this answer
    
Private operator new/delete doesn't prevent someone from creating one on the heap. Sometimes you just have to accept people can break your code if they try. –  Fred Nurk Feb 1 '11 at 16:27
add comment

Since you're using C++, why not use RAII? You'd still need to check for re-entrant use, but RAII simplifies things considerably. Combined with larsmans' mutex and Raedwald's elimination in NDEBUG:

struct Frobber {
  Frobber() {
    assert(mtx.try_lock());
#ifndef NDEBUG
    try {  // in case prepare throws
#endif
      prepare();
#ifndef NDEBUG
    }
    catch (...) {
      mtx.unlock();
      throw;
    }
#endif
  }

  void something();
  // And the other actions that can be performed between preparation and finishing.

  ~Frobber() {
    finish();
#ifndef NDEBUG
    mtx.unlock();
#endif
  }

private:
#ifndef NDEBUG
  static boost::mutex mtx;
#endif

  Frobber(Frobber const&);  // not defined; 0x: = delete
  Frobber& operator=(Frobber const&);  // not defined; 0x: = delete
};
#ifndef NDEBUG
boost::mutex Frobber::mtx;
#endif

void example() {
  Frobber blah;  // instead of prepare()
  blah.something();
  // implicit finish()
}

Inside example, you simply cannot do something without first preparing, and finishing will always happen, even if an exception is thrown.

Side note about NDEBUG: if you use it this way, make sure it is either always defined or always undefined in all translation units, as opposed to how it's used for assert (allowing it to be defined and undefined at various points).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I forgot to mention this application is very latency-sensitive and hence RAII wouldn't be appropriate. Thanks for the suggestion, and it's good under typical application scenarios and requirements. –  chriskirk Feb 1 '11 at 16:13
    
@chriskirk: How do you think the above code will adversely affect latency? What overhead do you see compared to the non-RAII case? –  Fred Nurk Feb 1 '11 at 16:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.