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Obviously the query in the title does not work, but it might illustrate in a naive way, what I would like to do. I have a table that contains some users identified by an id column. This id is NOT unique within the database. It marks a user that may have multiple records in my table.

How can I show the whole record of all users (identified by id) that have more than 10 records in my table?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use having instead of where:

SELECT id
  FROM (
        SELECT id, COUNT(*) as cnt
        FROM sowewhere 
        GROUP BY id
        HAVING cnt > 1
   ) temp_table
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This one here really fast and has exactly the same result as my query. Though it's more elegant of course ;) . Why is this little difference in HAVING causing so much difference compared to Ishtar's approach? –  Matt Bannert Feb 1 '11 at 16:16
    
This is the exact same as my approach except mine doesn't have the extra SELECT statement surrounding it. Why do you need the extra SELECT? –  anothershrubery Feb 1 '11 at 16:27
    
I don't need it, it just allows you to sort by non-aggregate columns with outermost select. –  dev-null-dweller Feb 1 '11 at 16:49
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SELECT * FROM user 
WHERE id IN (SELECT id FROM user GROUP BY id HAVING COUNT(*) > 10)
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I can't really tell why, but this really long compared to mine. –  Matt Bannert Feb 1 '11 at 16:12
    
@ran2 - long? What do you mean? Slow?? –  Ishtar Feb 1 '11 at 18:46
    
dammit. I don't know what I was thinking when in wrote that. Probably I wanted to write it takes longer than mine. Good guess, though ;) –  Matt Bannert Feb 1 '11 at 19:23
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SELECT id, COUNT(*) FROM Table GROUP BY id HAVING COUNT(*) > 10
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Remove COUNT(*) from the beginning if you just want the id's, but I put it in there to show the total number for each id in the table. –  anothershrubery Feb 1 '11 at 16:01
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here is how:

 CREATE TABLE mytable_clean AS
 SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE id IN(
 SELECT id FROM
 (SELECT id,COUNT(*) AS appearance 
 FROM mytable
 GROUP BY id) AS id_count
 WHERE id_count.appearance > 9 )

It does work. It's not to slow, but looks a little clumsy to me. Better solutions welcome :)

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