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I am writing a prototype TCP connection and I am having some trouble homogenizing the data to be sent.

At the moment, I am sending nothing but strings, but in the future we want to be able to send any object.

The code is quite simple at the moment, because I thought everything could be cast into a byte array:

void SendData(object headerObject, object bodyObject)
{
  byte[] header = (byte[])headerObject;  //strings at runtime, 
  byte[] body = (byte[])bodyObject;      //invalid cast exception

  // Unable to cast object of type 'System.String' to type 'System.Byte[]'.
  ...
}

This of course is easily enough solved with a

if( state.headerObject is System.String ){...}

The problem is, if I do it that way, I need to check for EVERY type of object that can't be cast to a byte[] at runtime.

Since I do not know every object that can't be cast into a byte[] at runtime, this really isn't an option.

How does one convert any object at all into a byte array in C# .NET 4.0?

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2  
This isn't possible in any meaningful way in general (consider, for example, an instance of FileStream, or any object that encapsulates a handle like that). –  Jason Feb 1 '11 at 16:26
1  
Do you intend to have all the clients running .NET? If the answer is no, you should consider some other form of serialization (XML, JSON, or the likes) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 1 '11 at 16:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Use the BinaryFormatter:

private byte[] ObjectToByteArray(Object obj)
{
    if(obj == null)
        return null;
    BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
    using(MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        bf.Serialize(ms, obj);
        return ms.ToArray();
    }
}
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6  
Be careful with what you do with "any" object on the other side, as it may no longer make sense (for example, if that object were a handle to a file, or similar) –  Rowland Shaw Feb 1 '11 at 16:27
    
Yup, normal caveats apply, but it's not a bad idea to remind folks of them. –  Daniel DiPaolo Feb 1 '11 at 16:28
10  
It might be good idea to wrap the use of the MemoryStream in a using block, as it will eagerly release the internal buffer used. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 1 '11 at 16:28

Use the below code

    // Convert an object to a byte array
    private byte[] ObjectToByteArray(Object obj)
    {
       if(obj == null)
       return null;
       BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
       MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
       bf.Serialize(ms, obj);
       return ms.ToArray();
    }

// Convert a byte array to an Object
    private Object ByteArrayToObject(byte[] arrBytes)
    {
      MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream();
      BinaryFormatter binForm = new BinaryFormatter();
      memStream.Write(arrBytes, 0, arrBytes.Length);
      memStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
      Object obj = (Object) binForm.Deserialize(memStream);
      return obj;
    }
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2  
+1 for providing both code and decode methods. –  Miroslav Popov Jun 8 at 17:43
2  
As mentioned in a comment to this answer, the MemorySteam should be wrapped in a using block. –  rookie1024 Jul 30 at 20:33
    
is there anything I have to respect in adition? I implemented it that way and Formatting a Object containing 3 int32 public members results in a 244 Bytes long ByteArray. Am I not knowing something about C# syntax or is there anything I would probabbly miss using? –  Zaibis Sep 25 at 11:56
    
Sorry, I can't get your problem. Can you post the code? –  kombsh Sep 25 at 11:59
    
@kombsh I try in short form: [Serializable] class GameConfiguration { public map_options_t enumMapIndex; public Int32 iPlayerAmount; private Int32 iGameID; } byte[] baPacket; GameConfiguration objGameConfClient = new GameConfiguration(); baPacket = BinModler.ObjectToByteArray(objGameConfClient); Now baPacket contains around 244 Bytes f content. I jsut expected 12. –  Zaibis Sep 25 at 12:13

What you're looking for is serialization. There are several forms of serialization available for the .Net platform

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How about serialization? take a look here.

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You could use the built-in serialization tools in the framework and serialize to a MemoryStream. This may be the most straightforward option, but might produce a larger byte[] than may be strictly necessary for your scenario.

If that is the case, you could utilize reflection to iterate over the fields and/or properties in the object to be serialized and manually write them to the MemoryStream, calling the serialization recursively if needed to serialize non-trivial types. This method is more complex and will take more time to implement, but allows you much more control over the serialized stream.

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Alternative way to convert object to byte array:

    TypeConverter objConverter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(objMsg.GetType());
    byte[] data = (byte[])objConverter.ConvertTo(objMsg, typeof(byte[]));
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I'd rather use the expression "serialization" than "casting into bytes". Serializing an object means converting it into a byte array (or XML, or something else) that can be used on the remote box to re-construct the object. In .NET, the Serializable attribute marks types whose objects can be serialized.

Cheers, Matthias

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Like others said before, you could use binary serialization, but it may produce an extra bytes or deserialized into object with not exactly same data. Using reflection on the other hand is quite complicated. There is one other solution that will strictly convert your object to bytes and vise-versa - marshalling:

var size = Marshal.SizeOf(your_object);
// Both managed and unmanaged buffers required.
var bytes = new byte[size];
var ptr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(size);
// Copy object byte-to-byte to unmanaged memory.
Marshal.StructureToPtr(font.LogFont, ptr, false);
// Copy data from unmanaged memory to managed buffer.
Marshal.Copy(ptr, bytes, 0, size);
// Release unmanaged memory.
Marshal.FreeHGlobal(ptr);

And to convert bytes to object:

var bytes = new byte[size];
var ptr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(size);
Marshal.Copy(bytes, 0, ptr, size);
var your_object = (YourType)Marshal.PtrToStructure(ptr, typeof(YourType));
Marshal.FreeHGlobal(ptr);

This is quite slow and unsafe to use in most cases, but it's easiest way to strictly convert object to byte[] without implementing serialization and without [Serializable] attribute.

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Why do you think StructureToPtr + Copy is slow? How can it be slower than serialization? Is there any faster solution? –  Anton Samsonov Oct 31 '13 at 17:32
    
If you use it for small structs consisting of few simple types, yes (which is quite a common case), it is slow because of marshalling and quad copying (from object to heap, from heap to bytes, from bytes to heap, from heap to object). It could be faster when IntPtr is used instead of bytes, but not in this case. And it's faster for such types to write own serializer that simply puts values into byte array. I'm not saying it's slower than build-in serialization nor that it's "so very damn slow". –  Aberro Nov 26 '13 at 13:46

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