Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a query:

select min(timestamp) from table

This table has 60+million rows, and daily I delete a few off the end. To determine whether or not there is any data old enough do delete I run the query above. There is an index on timestamp ascending, containing only one column, and the query plan in oracle causes this to be a full index scan. Should this not be the definition of a seek?

edit including plan:

| Id  | Operation                  | Name       | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
|   2 |   INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX)| NEVENTS_I2 |     1 |     8 |     4   (100)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE            |            |     1 |     8 |            |          |
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT           |            |     1 |     8 |     4   (0)| 00:00:01 |
share|improve this question
    
by "full scan" I assume you mean index full scan, not table scan, correct? –  tbone Feb 1 '11 at 16:57
    
@tbone yes a full index scan –  Nathan Feger Feb 1 '11 at 17:02
    
Is this slow? What response times are you getting? –  tbone Feb 1 '11 at 18:10
2  
An index full scan is effectively a range scan where there isn't a top or bottom limit. The query will only scan as many rows as needed. So although it says full scan, it won't actually read every block of the index. It starts at one end and will only read down to the first leaf block and then it will be complete. –  Gary Myers Feb 1 '11 at 22:47
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

At first I thought that the index would only be used if the column is declared NOT NULL. I tested with the following setup:

SQL> CREATE TABLE my_table (ts TIMESTAMP);

Table created

SQL> INSERT INTO my_table
  2  SELECT systimestamp + ROWNUM * INTERVAL '1' SECOND 
  3    FROM dual CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 100000;

100000 rows inserted

SQL> CREATE INDEX ix ON my_table(ts);

Index created

SQL> EXPLAIN PLAN FOR SELECT MIN(ts) FROM my_table;

Explained

SQL> SELECT * FROM TABLE(dbms_xplan.display);

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                  | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT           |      |     1 |    13 |    69   (2)| 00:00:0
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE            |      |     1 |    13 |            |
|   2 |   INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX)| IX   | 90958 |  1154K|            |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here we notice that the index is used, but all rows from the index are read. If we specify that the column is not null we get a much better plan:

SQL> ALTER TABLE my_table MODIFY ts NOT NULL;

Table altered

SQL> EXPLAIN PLAN FOR SELECT MIN(ts) FROM my_table;

Explained

SQL> SELECT * FROM TABLE(dbms_xplan.display);

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                  | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT           |      |     1 |    13 |     2   (0)| 00:00:0
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE            |      |     1 |    13 |            |
|   2 |   INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX)| IX   | 90958 |  1154K|     2   (0)| 00:00:0
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In fact this is the same plan that is also used if we add a WHERE clause (Oracle will read a single row from the index):

SQL> EXPLAIN PLAN FOR SELECT MIN(ts) FROM my_table WHERE ts IS NOT NULL;

Explained

SQL> SELECT * FROM TABLE(dbms_xplan.display);

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                   | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |      |     1 |    13 |     2   (0)| 00:00:
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE             |      |     1 |    13 |            |
|   2 |   FIRST ROW                 |      | 90958 |  1154K|     2   (0)| 00:00:
|   3 |    INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX)| IX   | 90958 |  1154K|     2   (0)| 00:00:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This last plan shows (line 2) that Oracle is indeed performing a "seek".

share|improve this answer
    
the column in question is not nullable, thanks for the text results of explain plan btw –  Nathan Feger Feb 1 '11 at 17:16
add comment

Can you post the actual query plan? Are you sure that it is not doing a min/max index full scan? As you can see in this example, we're getting the MIN value from a 100,000 row table using a min/max index full scan with only a handful of consistent gets.

SQL> create table foo (
  2    col1 date not null
  3  );

Table created.

SQL> insert into foo
  2    select sysdate + level
  3      from dual
  4   connect by level <= 100000;

100000 rows created.

SQL> create index idx_foo_col1
  2      on foo( col1 );

Index created.

SQL> analyze table foo compute statistics for all indexed columns;

Table analyzed.

SQL> set autotrace on;

<<Note that I ran this statement once just to get the delayed block cleanout to 
  happen so that the consistent gets number wouldn't be skewed.  You could run a
  different query as well>>

  1* select min(col1) from foo
SQL> /

MIN(COL1)
---------
02-FEB-11


Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 817909383

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------

| Id  | Operation                  | Name         | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)|

 Time     |

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------

|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT           |              |     1 |     7 |     2   (0)|

 00:00:01 |

|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE            |              |     1 |     7 |            |

          |

|   2 |   INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX)| IDX_FOO_COL1 |     1 |     7 |     2   (0)|

 00:00:01 |

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------


Note
-----
   - dynamic sampling used for this statement (level=2)


Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          0  recursive calls
          0  db block gets
          2  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
        532  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        524  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          2  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
          1  rows processed
share|improve this answer
add comment

Just wanted to hone in on the fact that an "INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX)" is simply not the same as an "INDEX FULL SCAN". An INDEX FULL SCAN really does scan the entire index (possibly with filtering). However an INDEX FULL SCAN (MIN/MAX) or INDEX RANGE SCAN (MIN/MAX) only gets the smallest or largest leaf block (from the range), but can only be employed as long as the column is NOT NULL (which is a bit silly, and really a bug, since a NULL value is by definition neither the smallest nor largest value). The (MIN/MAX) optimization is an implicit FIRST_ROWS action, and doesn't need the "WHERE ... IS NOT NULL" query condition to perform the optimization. Interestingly the MIN/MAX optimization is normally not considered by the CBO for function-based indexes, that's another little bug.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.