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I need to know how to make my cin statement not appear to 'remove' itself if you input the wrong type. The code is here:

int mathOperator()
{
  using namespace std;

  int Input;
  do
  {
    cout << "Choose: ";
    el();
    cout << "1) Addition";
    el();
    cout << "2) Subtraction";
    el();
    cout << "3) Multiplication";
    el();
    cout << "4) Division";
    el();
    el();
    cin >> Input;

  }
  while (Input != 1 && Input != 2 && Input!=3 && Input!=4);
  return Input;
}

Execute, enter, for example, a character, and it loops nonstop acting as though the cin statement isn't there.

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2  
I think everyone has had this problem at some time. Consider it a rite of passage, Ashley. –  Rob Kennedy Feb 1 '11 at 17:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After reading in a bad value, cin is in a "failed" state. You have to reset this.

You must both clear the error flag and empty the buffer. thus:

   cin.clear(); 
   cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<streamsize>::max(), '\n');

The second call "flushes" the input buffer of any data that might be there, to get you ready for the next "cin" call.

If you find yourself writing these 2 lines "all over your code" you could write a simple inline function to replace it.

   inline void reset( std::istream & is )
   {
       is.clear();
       is.ignore( std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n' );
   }

Although I have made this function take any istream, most of the time it would only be used for cin where a user is entering and enters something invalid. If it's an invalid file or stringstream input, there is no way to fix it and you would do best to just throw an exception.

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do I put something in place of numeric_limits? If so, what? Thanks –  Gnuey Jan 16 '13 at 21:58

You must check that input succeeded and handle when it doesn't:

int mathOperator() {
  using namespace std;

  int Input;
  do {
    cout << "Choose: ";
    el();
    cout << "1) Addition";
    el();
    cout << "2) Subtraction";
    el();
    cout << "3) Multiplication";
    el();
    cout << "4) Division";
    el();
    el();
    while (!(cin >> Input)) {  // failed to extract
      if (cin.eof()) {  // testing eof() *after* failure detected
        throw std::runtime_error("unexpected EOF on stdin");
      }
      cin.clear();  // clear stream state
      cin.ignore(INT_MAX, '\n');  // ignore rest of line
      cout << "Input error.  Try again!\n";
    }
  } while (Input != 1 && Input != 2 && Input!=3 && Input!=4);
  return Input;
}

If you don't check that extraction succeeded, then cin is left in a failed state (cin.fail()). Once in a failed state, later extractions will immediately return instead of trying to read from the stream, effectively making them no-ops – leading to your infinite loop.

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+1 for handling the underlying problem. Still as hilal wrote, it is probably a char he is interested in –  Daniel Wedlund Feb 1 '11 at 17:30
    
@DanielPersson: I doubt that. –  Fred Nurk Feb 1 '11 at 17:31

Unless you're quite certain about the input being in the proper format, you rarely want to use operator>> directly from the input stream.

It's usually easier to read a line with std::getline, put that into a std::istringstream, and read from there. If that fails, you print/log an error message, throw away the remainder of the line and (possibly) go on to the next line.

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don't read int, read char so cin will pass any invalid character

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don't read my answer :) –  user467871 Feb 1 '11 at 17:11
    
Thanks much appreciated. –  Ashley Davies Feb 1 '11 at 17:13
    
that would work but it does not teach the user how to reset a bad cin –  CashCow Feb 1 '11 at 17:14
    
This is only a partial solution for many reasons, including how to handle 10 choices. –  Fred Nurk Feb 1 '11 at 17:17
char Input;

 do
 {
// same code 
 }
 while (Input != '1' && Input != '2' && Input != '3' && Input!='4');
 return Input;

[EDIT]

If you want convert char to int you can use this piece of code

int i = (Input - 48);
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Thanks, wouldn't've thought of that :) is there any function with functionality such as something like ChangeToNumber(char a) so I won't have to rewrite too much, I have a few functions which rely on the value being integer. –  Ashley Davies Feb 1 '11 at 17:12
    
(int)(Input - 48) I'm now editing my answer –  user467871 Feb 1 '11 at 17:13
2  
Using 48 directly is a lousy idea. At the very least Input-'0' (and even then only after assuring that the character you've read is a digit --e.g., with isdigit). –  Jerry Coffin Feb 1 '11 at 17:41
    
@Jerry - Input - '0' (which is more elegant) works even if the input is not a digit since you are bounded by [0, 9]. Anything outside that range would immediately tell you that it is not a digit and thus not valid input. –  Zac Howland Feb 1 '11 at 17:55

I agree that a char is just as handy, since you can always cast to int, to answer your question as to why this is happening, when a cin input is exected as an int but a char is entered, the input is kept in the input stream for the duration of the loop, which is why it seems to "disappear."

For more information: see the post from Narue at http://www.daniweb.com/forums/thread11505.html

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