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I've done a similar JOIN in a UPDATE script, but I used the same table in the SET and WHERE clause. In this DELETE script I need to delete from one table where a condition is true in another table. For example:

DELETE FROM `db_A`.`table_A`
JOIN `db_B`.`table_B`
ON `table_A`.`id` = `table_B`.`id`
WHERE `table_B`.`name`  = 'Remove Me'

Can I do something like this?

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1  
...Have you tried it? –  Adam Robinson Feb 1 '11 at 17:41

3 Answers 3

The MYSQL documentation makes it very clear that yes you can do this

You can specify multiple tables in a DELETE statement to delete rows from one or more tables depending on the particular condition in the WHERE clause. However, you cannot use ORDER BY or LIMIT in a multiple-table DELETE. The table_references clause lists the tables involved in the join. Its syntax is described in Section 12.2.8.1, “JOIN Syntax”.

For the first multiple-table syntax, only matching rows from the tables listed before the FROM clause are deleted. For the second multiple-table syntax, only matching rows from the tables listed in the FROM clause (before the USING clause) are deleted. The effect is that you can delete rows from many tables at the same time and have additional tables that are used only for searching:

DELETE t1, t2 FROM t1 INNER JOIN t2 INNER JOIN t3
WHERE t1.id=t2.id AND t2.id=t3.id;

Or:

DELETE FROM t1, t2 USING t1 INNER JOIN t2 INNER JOIN t3
WHERE t1.id=t2.id AND t2.id=t3.id;

These statements use all three tables when searching for rows to delete, but delete matching rows only from tables t1 and t2.

The preceding examples use INNER JOIN, but multiple-table DELETE statements can use other types of join permitted in SELECT statements, such as LEFT JOIN. For example, to delete rows that exist in t1 that have no match in t2, use a LEFT JOIN:

DELETE t1 FROM t1 LEFT JOIN t2 ON t1.id=t2.id WHERE t2.id IS NULL;
The syntax permits .* after each tbl_name for compatibility with Access.
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From Delete Manual, the table you want to delete goes between DELETE and FROM. Unless you want to delete from all tables involved in the join

DELETE `db_A`.`table_A` FROM `db_A`.`table_A`
JOIN `db_B`.`table_B`
ON `table_A`.`id` = `table_B`.`id`
WHERE `table_B`.`name`  = 'Remove Me'
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As a general answer, yes. You can join to the second table with the condition, as you have stated, or pull the ids in a subcommand, like:

DELETE FROM T1 WHERE id in (SELECT id FROM T1 JOIN T2 ON X = Y WHERE T2.Val = "X")

This is a bit heavy weight, but if T2 is the child, you can reduce this to:

(SELECT Y from T2 WHERE Val = "X")

Make sense?

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