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I am having some difficulty with doing an automated login for users in my desktop Active Directory application. I may be trying to do an SSO, but I am under the impression that is only for web applications.

The code I have, is this:

PrincipalContext theContext = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain);
if (theContext.ValidateCredentials(null, null))
    Console.WriteLine("Credentials have been validated. Tell your friends.");
else
    Console.WriteLine("Invalid credentials");
UserPrincipal user = new UserPrincipal(theContext, "uatu", "Passw0rd", true);
user.Save();

The PrincipalContext is being created without error, and I am validating the credentials. I assumed this would validate me as the user that logged in to the computer, which is under the Active Directory domain. And I can find users and groups. But as soon as I call user.Save() I get the error "Access is denied." Am I actually getting into Active Directory as a guest user?

If I set the user name and password in ValidateCredentials, it doesn't help.

PrincipalContext theContext = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain);
if (theContext.ValidateCredentials("<username>", "<password", ContextOptions.Negotiate | ContextOptions.Signing | ContextOptions.Sealing))
    Console.WriteLine("Credentials have been validated. Tell your friends.");
else
    Console.WriteLine("Invalid credentials");
UserPrincipal user = new UserPrincipal(theContext, "uatu", "Passw0rd", true);
user.Save();

That code still fails on user.Save(). If I explicitly set the username and password to match myself as the logged in user in the PrincipalContext constructor, then I get success.

PrinicipalContext  theContext = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain,"<address>", "<domain context>", "<username>", "<password>");
UserPrincipal user = new UserPrincipal(theContext, "uatu", "Passw0rd", true);
user.Save();

That code succeeds. But I would rather not have the user log in to my application after they have logged into their computer with the exact same credentials.

I have been hearing a bit about "Affiliate Application", so I'm wondering if I have to let Active Directory know that it can trust my application. I am still hazy on the details through, and don't know if that is the wrong direction.

Does anyone have an idea as to what I should be doing?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are trying to modify UserPrincipals, you have a couple options:

  1. User is already authenticated to windows as a user with permission to edit active directory:
    • Use the Constructor for PrincipalContext which doesn't take username/password
      • This will run the context as the currently logged in user
    • Run query, var usr = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(ctx, "bob@domain.local");
    • Perform manipulations on usr object
    • Call usr.Save(); on the returned user from the query.
  2. User is authenticated to windows, but you must "impersonate" a user with AD permission
    • Use the Constructor for PrincipalContext which takes username/password
      • This will run the context as the credentials you passed in
    • Run query, var usr = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity(ctx, "bob@domain.local");
    • Perform manipulations on usr object
    • Call usr.Save(); on the returned user from the query.

Based on your explanation above, I'm presuming you need option #1. ValidateCredentials(); is only used to validate credentials, it returns a true/false if the credentials you've given it are valid. Calling it has no lasting affect, it only validates. If you need to impersonate a user, you need to use the PrincipalContext constructor which takes credentials.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I am looking for option #1. But the current logged in user is the same one I use in the third example, so in theory they should have the same access privileges. I ran the query var usr = UserPrincipal.FindByIdentity() with a user that I knew was present. I manipulated the Surname and then called usr.Save() and got the usual error, "Access is Denied." I am now suspecting that I have something set up incorrectly on the Active Directory server if everything you have told me is true. –  Erik Allen Feb 1 '11 at 18:48
    
You may need to "Delegate Control" of a the Organizational Unit that contains the users. When you delegate, you can pick a single user or a security group. Right click on the OU and choose "Delegate Control." –  Nate Feb 1 '11 at 21:04
    
Okay, it does seem like it was a configuration problem. When I started logging in as a different user, everything seemed to work. (That box had two users with the same name so I'm guessing it got confused.) So in summary, my code was correct, and your answer was also correct. But you have to have a good Active Directory setup. I didn't even need the Delegate Control to get it working. Thank you for your help. –  Erik Allen Feb 1 '11 at 22:17
    
You may need to delegate if the users doing modifications are not domain admins. –  Nate Feb 2 '11 at 0:33

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