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You should be in the ~home/pub/test directory. Create a file log.info in your home directory containing two columns, where the first column is the number of times the person has been logged and the second column is the person’s name (use cut to remove the .log from the output). The file should be sorted in ascending order of the number of log entries (least on top). The last line of the file will be 42 total. The output looks like this:

   1 jane
   1 jill
   1 matilda
   1 mati
   1 sally
   1 sam
   1 wilma
   3 fred
   3 george
   4 alex
   7 gerry
   7 jack
   11 mary
   42 total

This is what I have so far. Any idea where I am going wrong?

grep -r -i .0 ~home/pub/test/*.log | cut -f9 -d "/" | cut -f1 -d "." | uniq -c | sort -n
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what's the structure of ~home/pub/test? How many *.log files are in there and what's their format? –  peoro Feb 1 '11 at 18:16
    
You might also want to tell us what the output of your attempt is –  thkala Feb 1 '11 at 18:23
    
There are 8 log files; and this was my output: –  Justice Feb 1 '11 at 18:30
    
1 jane 1 jill 1 matilda 1 mati 1 sally 1 sam 1 wilma 3 fred 3 george 4 alex 7 gerry 7 jack 11 mary –  Justice Feb 1 '11 at 18:31
    
What does the content of the log files look like? –  thkala Feb 1 '11 at 18:32

2 Answers 2

Pipe your pipeline into:

awk '{sum += $1; print} END {print sum, "total"}'
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Here's my (untested) shot in the dark:

$ cd ~home/pub/test/
$ wc -l *.log | cut -d . -f 1 | sort -n

I am assuming that the log files contain one login per line, unless you specify otherwise.

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