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I've just recently found the need for multithreading. So what I've done, is I've created a very simple project which it's only purpose is to demonstrate multithreading.

What my program will do, is have two threads, thread A will generate information, one piece at a time, and pass it to thread B, which will process this information as fast as it can and then move on to the next posted piece of information.

So I made a Queue object.

Here are my bare bones classes, I made. I would much appreciate if anyone could point out things that I do manually that have well established conventions. Or if I am doing anything wrong.

The Main class that calls and instantiates everything:

import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

public class Main {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Queue queue = new Queue( true ) ;

    PutStuff put = new PutStuff( queue ) ; 
    GetStuff get = new GetStuff( queue ) ; 

    ExecutorService e = Executors.newFixedThreadPool( 2 ) ;

    e.execute( put ) ;
    e.execute( get ) ;

    e.shutdown() ;

    System.out.println( "Threads Processing, main() ended." ) ;

}

}

The PutStuff class

import java.util.Random;

public class PutStuff implements Runnable {

private Queue queue ;

public PutStuff( Queue queue ) {

    this.queue = queue ; 

}

public void run() {

    for( int i = 0 ; i < 5 ; i++ ) {

        try {
            Thread.sleep( new Random().nextInt( 400 ) ) ;
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        queue.put( "Msg " + i ) ;

    }

    System.out.println( "End A" ) ;
    queue.die() ; 

}

}

The GetStuff class:

import java.util.Random;

public class GetStuff implements Runnable {

Queue queue ;

public GetStuff( Queue queue ) {

    this.queue = queue ;

}

// This is the entry point for the second thread.
public void run() {

    while( queue.isAlive() ) {

        try {
            Thread.sleep( new Random().nextInt( 500 ) ) ;
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        queue.get() ; 

    }

    System.out.println( "End B" ) ;

}

}

And finally, the Queue class:

import java.util.ArrayList;

class Queue {

private ArrayList<Object> arlQueue = new ArrayList<Object>() ;

private boolean alive = true ; 
private boolean dying = false ; 

private boolean printMessages = false ; 

public Queue() { 

    this( false ) ;

}

public Queue( boolean printMessages ) { 

    this.printMessages = printMessages ; 

}

public synchronized Object get() {

    Object value = null ; 

    if( arlQueue.size() == 0 ) {

        try {
            printStatus( "Waiting for queue..." ) ;
            wait();
        } catch(InterruptedException e) {
            System.out.println("InterruptedException caught");
        }

    }

    if( arlQueue.size() > 0 ) {

        value = arlQueue.get( 0 ) ; 
        arlQueue.remove( 0 ) ;

    }

    printStatus( "Got: " + value ) ;

    if( dying && arlQueue.size() == 0 ) {

        alive = false ; 

    }

    notify();
    return value ;

}

public synchronized void put( Object value ) {

    this.arlQueue.add( value ) ; 

    printStatus( "Put: " + value ) ;
    notify();

}

private void printStatus( String msg ) {

    if( printMessages ) {
        System.out.println( "[" + System.currentTimeMillis() + "] " + msg ) ;
    }

}

public synchronized void die() { 

    dying = true ; 
    notify() ;

}

public synchronized boolean isAlive() { 

    return alive ; 

}

}

Please be gentle :)

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
There's actually a codereview.stackexchange.com site for code reviews! You'll probably get more eyes here, but it could get closed and (hopefully) moved over there. – CanSpice Feb 1 '11 at 18:25
    
See the java.util.concurrent package, just in case the existence was unknown. – user166390 Feb 1 '11 at 18:26
    
Oh, I didn't know that, my apologies for it being in the wrong place. – MYou Feb 1 '11 at 18:28

You need to should really use a blocking queue. This will do the synchronization stuff for you. It will greatly simplify your code.

See Java's BlockingQueue interface for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't need, even if highly recommended to use an existing library/class/interface. – user166390 Feb 1 '11 at 18:28
1  
@pst, true. There isn't necessarily a need. It is Highly recommended though. – jjnguy Feb 1 '11 at 18:32
    
Using a BlockingQueue instead of my own hand rolled queue, what would be a proper way of terminating the GetStuff thread when both PutStuff is terminated AND the BlockingQueue is empty? – MYou Feb 1 '11 at 21:10
1  
@Matthew, You can make those threads 'deamon' threads. That way when all non deamon threads have died, all deamon threads will die with them. – jjnguy Feb 1 '11 at 21:12
    
@Justin 'jjnguy' Nelson Thanks for the edit, you get the +1 :) – user166390 Feb 2 '11 at 4:17

Like everyone else mentioned, if this is production code then I suggest the use of the java.util.concurrent package. There's still a few things worth noting in there so I'll point those out.

First off, you might want to take another look at the wait() method because the doc mentions that it can return spuriously. That means that it can return at any time without you having called notify(). To avoid problems related to this, you should always check your condition when wait() returns. The doc has an example on how to do this:

 synchronized (obj) {
     while (<condition does not hold>)
         obj.wait();
     ... // Perform action appropriate to condition
 }

Also, you're using a coarse synchronisation mechanism (blocks for everyone when manipulating the queue). While this is fine when working with two threads, it might not scale too well to many threads. On the other hand, this also eliminates a couple of potential problems (volatile variables and thread-safe containers) so it's not all bad.

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