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I have an embedded system running a web server that will usually be connected to an Ethernet network so users can simply enter the IP address of the device to access it.

However, I also need to make some of the same website functionality avaiable to users of the serial port on the device. It would be nice if I could reuse some of the logic I've developed for the web forms for this.

I am currently using .NET for development on my desktop and my embedded device is Linux based. Is it possible to host website content via a serial port or is there some other means by which I can pull this off?

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What level of support are you expecting i.e. what user interaction and with what sort of client? –  Tim Lloyd Feb 1 '11 at 18:49
    
@kittyhawk Do you mean you want to send and receive HTTP messages over a serial-port connection? –  Dan J Feb 1 '11 at 18:49
    
I'd like something that emulates a web browser or a form of some kind if possible. Right now, my serial port users can fire up a terminal program such as Putty and make changes via the Linux command line. However, they are not at all command line savvy. My goal is to develop a UI for them to be able to change things. –  kittyhawk Feb 1 '11 at 18:54
    
@kittyhawk And you'd like the UI to be a website hosted by the embedded device, and served over the serial connection? It sounds like you're asking how to do TCP/IP over serial. I can't find any references for that... It might be far simpler to just write a client-side GUI to communicate over serial with your embedded device... –  Dan J Feb 1 '11 at 19:09
    
I've never tried it, but surely there is a way to set up a serial port as a network adapter in the OS? Or maybe some cheap serial-to-ethernet adapter you could buy? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 1 '11 at 20:43
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4 Answers

Just a wild guess: back in the days when you connected by modem to the internet, there was a SLIP protocol: IP over Serial Line. Could you use that to establish an "internet connection" to your device?

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The first thing that comes to mind is some sort of LYNX like browser (I don't even know if it exists anymore). Maybe easier would be to just do a simple command line interface? It's linux, so you should just be able to spin up a telnet session pretty easily, right?

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Sure I can use telnet or a terminal program to access the Linux command line. However, I want some kind of UI for my users. Nothing fancy, just a simple data entry form that modifies a file on the device. –  kittyhawk Feb 1 '11 at 18:57
    
I think this was a suggestion to use a terminal session to a terminal-mode (text only) web browser running on the embedded system and accessing its on board web server. This would work, but would probably not be acceptable to today's point-and-click users. Even techies may find it aggravating unless the page it is accessing is extremely well designed for use with such a 'browser' –  Chris Stratton Feb 3 '11 at 17:50
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I believe you should be able to configure your Linux distribution to point your serial port at a terminal, and have that terminal log in with lynx as the shell.

You might want to follow directions for a Linux serial console (tutorial here) and potentially create a user account with the shell set directly to run lynx. Instruct the login prompt (/etc/issue in the tutorial) with the username and password.

Edit: If you're just looking for some sort of data entry from the console, you could just write a shell script or other program and point that user's shell to that application instead.

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You could build a TCP client application on your linux device that will talk to your linux web server and redirect data to serial port, and build a TCP server application for your users that will talk to their serial port and redirect data to some TCP port (like 12345). Then all your users need to do is to set their browser to http://localhost:12345 and connect their PC to linux device via serial port cross over cable.

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