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Like many programs flash their window on the taskbar / dock to alert the user to switch to the program,

Is it possible to flash the Browser window using Javascript? (FireFox-only scripts are also welcome)

This is useful for web-based Chat / Forum / Community-based software where there is lots of real-time activity.

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1  
Man... I must be blind... I re-read the question 4 times and I still read it as "without" using Javascript and was really confused by the javascript answers. –  Davy8 Aug 5 '09 at 21:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

@Hexagon Theory: Why would you ever rewrite the whole head element just to change the value of one element in the head? Your solution is horribly inefficient on multiple levels.

<html>
<head>
<link rel="icon" href="on.png" type="image/png" id="changeMe" />
<script type="text/javascript" src="flash.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>

flash.js:

function Flasher(speed) {
  var elem = document.getElementById('changeMe');

  this.timer = setTimeout(function() {
    elem.href = elem.href ==  'on.png' ? 'off.png' : 'on.png';
  }, speed);

  this.stop = function() { clearTimeout(this.timer); }
}

/* sample usage
 *
 * var flasher = new Flasher(1000);
 * flasher.stop();
 */

It didn't really have to be a class but it helped keep the global namespace clean. That's untested but if simply changing the href doesn't work for some reason, clone the link node, change the href and replace the old link with the cloned one.

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Looks good although I haven't got the time to test it yet. –  Jarvis Apr 25 '09 at 4:41

At this point, it seems only causing an alert dialog to pop up does the trick... this seems a bit too intrusive, I feel, particularly given the use you're trying to put it to. Instead of causing it to flash, though, you could modify document.title to grab the user's attention, either by prepending some signal (perhaps the string "NEW!") to the site's name, and then using an interval to constantly change it to "", which would then give a nice little "flashing" illusion.

Bare-bones example:

<html>
<head>
<title>Chat System</title>
<script>
var timer, old_t = document.title, blink_amount = 5, cur_b = 0;
function notify()
 {
cur_b = 0;
timer = setInterval(function()
 {
if (cur_b < blink_amount * 2)
 {
cur_b++;
document.title = (document.title.indexOf('NEW! ') != -1) ? old_t : 'NEW! ' + old_t;
 }
else
 {
clearInterval(timer);
 }
 }, 600);
 }

notify();

// From here, it's just a matter of calling the
// notify() function whenever you detect a new message.
</script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>
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The problem with that is that on systems where there is no text labels on the "task bar" (e.g. OS X, Win7 and a lot of Linux GUIs) you won't see anything happening. –  Steven Robbins Jan 28 '09 at 7:11
    
Changing dcument.title is the best i have seen, all others are too much intrusive. (The chat built into Gmail does this, so you have a very live example to decide). –  Nivas Jan 28 '09 at 7:12
    
@Steve: For those cases, you cannot flash the icon, anyway. On OSX, the accepted behavior is to bounce the dock icon (or put a badge over it), but i don't see any javascript way to do this. (The Fluid SSB does this somehow - i see the unread gmails count on the dock icon) –  Nivas Jan 28 '09 at 7:15

Hey, another interesting solution to this question hit me just now. Why not really grab the user's attention by making the icon flash in their browser? You could, for example, make two icons (on.png and off.png in my example below) and repeatedly swap them out to really catch a user's eye. The following is a bare-bones implementation; do keep in mind that you will need to reference this script remotely or put it in the body of the page because it uses a method that repeatedly replaces the content of the <head> tag. Give it a try, though; I rather like the simplicity of it.

page.html:

<html>
<head>
<link rel="icon" href="on.png" type="image/png" />
<script type="text/javascript" src="flash.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>

flash.js:

var timer, speed = 175;
function flash()
 {
head_html = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].innerHTML;
if (head_html.indexOf('href="on.png"') != -1)
document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].innerHTML = head_html.replace('on.png', 'off.png');
else
document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].innerHTML = head_html.replace('off.png', 'on.png');
timer = setTimeout('flash()', speed);
 }

function kill_flash() {clearTimeout(timer);}

flash();
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Quite interesting, but I was talking about flashing the browser's taskbar button, not just the tab. And most browsers show their App icon on the taskbar, not the page's. –  Jarvis Apr 25 '09 at 4:43

I just discovered window.getAttention() for Firefox, but it only works when an addon calls it.

  • Windows, the taskbar button for the window flashes
  • Linux, some window managers flash the taskbar button, others focus the window immediately
  • Macintosh, the icon in the upper right corner of the desktop flashes
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Window.Focus() should do it on Windows, not sure on other platforms though. You might find it brings the Window to the foreground if it's minimised though, which would be very annoying :)

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Window.Focus is not a function, and window.focus() doesn't do anything (windows xp/FF3). –  I.devries Jan 28 '09 at 9:34
    
window.focus() focuses the browser window and brings it to front. But it doesn't work if we have multiple tabs opened in the window. –  Shashwat Sep 21 '12 at 7:14

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