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The following example has no inherent meaning... it's just meant to demonstrate particular placement of labels, rugs, etc. and is representative of [edited] (a) a significantly larger project I'm working on that I can't discuss in detail, (b) which requires the use of ggplot, and (c) needs visual features of graphics similar to those reflected in the plot given, below.

Is it possible to recreate the following using ggplot2 either directly or with some fiddling with grid?

x <- rnorm(20)
y <- rnorm(20)

plot(x, y, axes=F, xlab="", ylab="")

axis(side = 1, at = round(mean(x), 2))
axis(side = 2, at = round(mean(y), 2))

axis(side = 3, at = round( range(x), 2 ))
axis(side = 4, at = round( range(y), 2 ))

rug(x, side=3)
rug(y, side=4)

Please see the solutions (Chase's, modified, and one based on Hadley's Geom code) posted below

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1  
What is the reason for wanting a ggplot2 solution? Is this just one of a series of panels you want to draw? If not, I don't see what is gained by ggplot2 or lattice over base graphics for something as simple as this and the lattice/ggplot equivalent will involve some amount of fiddling to achieve the same result. (IMHO) –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 21:14
4  
@William the only indication of that is "larger project" and that can cover a multitude of sins ;-) What isn't "that simple"? The plot or the example of single data set? Unless you need ggplot2/lattice capability of drawing conditioned plots they are overkill for this. Now, if you want a plot to fit in with other existing plots you've already done in ggplot2 as part of this project, I can understand the Q. –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 21:46
1  
So what's wrong with saying "...of a larger project I'm working on that uses ggplot2 for the graphics/plotting."? That I understand. I wasn't the only one wondering why ggplot2 was required, so it wasn't obvious. I agree that providing endless detail/context in Q's is not useful, but getting uppity when someone asks for a bit more context isn't helpful. –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 22:09
1  
@Gavin: and... if you read this thread, I don't think there's "uppity" in here... that interpretation is entirely due to the loss of audio/visual cues in computer mediated communication. Re-read my comments, assuming I'm not trying to be difficult, and I hope you'll see that they're just meant to be feedback on how to give feedback, constrained by ASCII and 500 character limits. –  William Doane Feb 1 '11 at 22:46
1  
@William Thanks for updating the Q (+1). Some of the comments/edits have been passing in the ether. I certainly asked my original comment in the spirit of @Joshua's comment above. There is a tendency to use it as it is the cool new kid on the block when it isn't always the most useful tool in many cases. Don't get me wrong, I really like ggplot2 and I use it all the time, it is just my experience that the high-level nature of ggplot often makes a custom plot like the one you want more difficult to produce. –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 22:46

2 Answers 2

I'll echo @Gavin's question, but for the sake of fiddling, this should get you pretty close:

qplot(x,y) + 
    geom_segment(data = data.frame(x), aes(x = x, y = max(x) - .05, xend = x, yend = max(x))) +         #x-rug
    geom_segment(data = data.frame(x), aes(x = min(x), y = max(x), xend = max(x), yend = max(x))) +     #x-rug
    geom_segment(data = data.frame(y), aes(x = max(x) + .05, y = y, xend = max(x), yend = y)) +         #y-rug
    geom_segment(data = data.frame(y), aes(x = max(x) + .05, y = min(y), xend = max(x) + .05, yend = max(y) )) + #y-rug
    scale_x_continuous(breaks = NA) +   
    scale_y_continuous(breaks = NA) +
    xlab(NULL) +
    ylab(NULL) +
    geom_text(aes(label = round(mean(x),2), x = mean(x), y = min(y) - .2), size = 4) +
    geom_text(aes(label = round(mean(y),2), x = min(x) - .2, y = mean(y)), size = 4) + 
    geom_text(aes(label = round(max(x),2), x = max(x) + .2, y = max(y) + .2), size = 4)
    #...add other text labels to your heart's desire.

If you don't need to put the rugs on the top and on the right, you can take advantage of geom_rug(). I don't know of an easy way to "move" the x or y axis away from their predefined locations. Something like this may be easier to digest / work with:

df <- data.frame(x,y)
qplot(x,y, data = df, geom = c("point", "rug")) # + ...any additional geom's here
share|improve this answer
    
@Chase, close indeed... but I know which plot I'd prefer to fiddle with. –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 21:32
    
@Gavin - completely agreed, though some of that ugliness could be wrapped up into an R function. I'm hoping someone will stop by and show off some grid editing skills and put Appendix C of Hadley's book to good use...I've read it a few times and still can't really wrap my head around it. On a related note, where are "rugs" commonly seen/ I haven't run across them in any of my work, but I could see them being helpful for certain applications. –  Chase Feb 1 '11 at 21:36
    
An interesting solution... I'm pretty sure I could make that work. Thank you! –  William Doane Feb 1 '11 at 21:47
1  
Rugs are handy to show simple distributions, particularly with ggplot's support of alpha... I figured there would be a solution that could use SegmentGrobs or some such, but that seemed needlessly low level... particularly since choosing a side for the rug to plot on is so (high level) simple in base graphics. I'd love to see other solutions, if anyone has one. –  William Doane Feb 1 '11 at 21:52
    
In addition to @William's comment on rugs, they (rugs) tend to be useful when you aren't showing the data directly (smooth functions fitted to them) or when it isn't easy to identify the univariate distribution of observations when displaying bivariate data (as in William's data/example). –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 22:14
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Accepted Solutions


Chase's Answer (Modified)

Chase's answer had a few Xs and Ys out of place, causing the top/right axes to float unexpectedly... Here's an updated version of it:

xxx <- function(x, y) {

 p <- qplot(x,y) + 
    geom_segment(data     = data.frame(x), 
                 aes(x    = x, 
                     y    = max(y) + .05, 
                     xend = x, 
                     yend = max(y) + .1  )) +     #top-ticks

    geom_segment(data     = data.frame(x), 
                 aes(x    = min(x), 
                     y    = max(y) + .1, 
                     xend = max(x), 
                     yend = max(y) + .1  )) +     #top-axis

    geom_segment(data     = data.frame(y), 
                 aes(x    = max(x) + .1, 
                     y    = y, 
                     xend = max(x) + .05, 
                     yend = y)) +                #right-ticks

    geom_segment(data     = data.frame(y), 
                 aes(x    = max(x) + .1, 
                     y    = min(y), 
                     xend = max(x) + .1, 
                     yend = max(y)     )) +      #right-axis

    scale_x_continuous(breaks = NA) +   
    scale_y_continuous(breaks = NA) +
    xlab(NULL) +
    ylab(NULL) +
    geom_text(aes(label = round(mean(x), 2), 
                  x     = mean(x), 
                  y     = min(y) - .2), 
              size = 4) +

    geom_text(aes(label = round(mean(y), 2), 
                  x     = min(x) - .2, 
                  y     = mean(y)), 
              size = 4) + 

    geom_text(aes(label = round(max(y), 2), 
                  x     = max(x) + .5, 
                  y     = max(y) + .0),        
              size = 4) +                   #right-max

    geom_text(aes(label = round(min(y), 2), 
                  x     = max(x) + .5, 
                  y     = min(y) - .0),         
              size = 4) +                    #right-min

    geom_text(aes(label = round(max(x), 2), 
                  x     = max(x) + .0, 
                  y     = max(y) + .2),        
              size = 4) +                   #top-max

    geom_text(aes(label = round(min(x), 2), 
                  x     = min(x) + .0, 
                  y     = max(y) + .2),         
              size = 4)                     #top-min

}

x <- rnorm(20)
y <- rnorm(20)

(xxx(x, y))

Solution Based on Hadley's Code

See: https://github.com/hadley/ggplot2/wiki/Creating-a-new-geom

Beginning with Hadley's geom-rug.r, essentially, I've changed only the location of the rugs by tweaking these two (partial) lines:

From

         y0 = unit(0, "npc"), y1 = unit(0.03, "npc"),

to

         y0 = unit(1.02, "npc"), y1 = unit(1.05, "npc"),

and from

         x0 = unit(0, "npc"), x1 = unit(0.03, "npc"),

to

         x0 = unit(1.02, "npc"), x1 = unit(1.05, "npc"),

 library(ggplot2)

 GeomRugAlt <- proto(Geom, {
   draw <- function(., data, scales, coordinates, ...) {  
     rugs <- list()
     data <- coordinates$transform(data, scales)    
     if (!is.null(data$x)) {
       rugs$x <- with(data, segmentsGrob(
         x0 = unit(x, "native"), x1 = unit(x, "native"), 
         y0 = unit(1.02, "npc"), y1 = unit(1.05, "npc"),
         gp = gpar(col = alpha(colour, alpha), lty = linetype, lwd = size * .pt)
       ))
     }  

     if (!is.null(data$y)) {
       rugs$y <- with(data, segmentsGrob(
         y0 = unit(y, "native"), y1 = unit(y, "native"), 
         x0 = unit(1.02, "npc"), x1 = unit(1.05), "npc"),
         gp = gpar(col = alpha(colour, alpha), lty = linetype, lwd = size * .pt)
       ))
     }  

     gTree(children = do.call("gList", rugs))
   }

   objname <- "rug_alt"

   desc <- "Marginal rug plots"

   default_stat <- function(.) StatIdentity
   default_aes <- function(.) aes(colour="black", size=0.5, linetype=1, alpha = 1)
   guide_geom <- function(.) "path"

   examples <- function(.) {
     p <- ggplot(mtcars, aes(x=wt, y=mpg))
     p + geom_point()
     p + geom_point() + geom_rug_alt()
     p + geom_point() + geom_rug_alt(position='jitter')
   }


 })

 geom_rug_alt <- GeomRugAlt$build_accessor()

 x <- rnorm(20)
 y <- rnorm(20)

 p <- qplot(x,y)
 p
 p + geom_rug() + geom_rug_alt()
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