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How do I check for nulls in an ‘==’ operator overload without infinite recursion?

Say I have a type like this:

public class Effect
{
    public static bool operator == ( Effect a, Effect b )
    {
        return a.Equals ( b );
    }

    public static bool operator != ( Effect a, Effect b )
    {
        return !a.Equals ( b );
    }

    public bool Equals ( Effect effect )
    {
        return this.TypeID.Equals ( effect.TypeID );
    }

    public override bool Equals ( object obj )
    {
        return this.TypeID.Equals ( ( ( Effect ) obj ).TypeID );
    }
}

What's the most robust and cleanest way to handle null values?

I am not sure if I have to check for null for both the current instance (this) and the passed instance (effect/obj)? If I have null for the current instance (this), would the compiler still call effect.Equals or Object.Equals?

Also either way where should the null checks be done? I am assuming only inside the Equals methods, and not the equality operators (==, !=).

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Andrew Whitaker, Mario, Brooks Moses, Graviton Dec 18 '12 at 4:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
is it really a good idea to substitute equality of two objects with equality of of their properties? I can see that working with structs, but overriding == for classes seems like a breeder for obscure bugs. –  Ilia G Feb 1 '11 at 21:11
    
@djacobson, thanks looks like a good answer over there. –  Joan Venge Feb 1 '11 at 21:20
1  
@liho1eye, @Joan: There is a guideline from MS that overloading == and Equals for mutable types is not a good idea. –  Henk Holterman Feb 1 '11 at 22:27
1  
@liho1eye : string is a reference type (and a collection). The value-based Equality works OK for it. –  Henk Holterman Feb 2 '11 at 8:13
1  
@Henk Holterman, string is also immutable :) –  Cor_Blimey Sep 23 '12 at 22:59

6 Answers 6

Firstly, this can never be null, at least not in code produced by the C# compiler.

Second, use the ReferenceEquals method to check for a null reference without possibly calling an overloaded version of == (or do ((object) sometypeinstance) == null).

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Thanks but if I have Effect e = null, wouldn't its "this" value be null in this case? –  Joan Venge Feb 1 '11 at 21:17
1  
+1, the only correct answer here, seriously! –  nawfal Dec 16 '12 at 9:10

Visual Studio has a snippet that provides a basic Equals() implementation for you. I'd follow that, unless you have a strong reason not to.

// override object.Equals
public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    //       
    // See the full list of guidelines at
    //   http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=85237  
    // and also the guidance for operator== at
    //   http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=85238
    //

    if (obj == null || GetType() != obj.GetType())
    {
        return false;
    }

    // TODO: write your implementation of Equals() here
    throw new NotImplementedException();
    return base.Equals(obj);
}

// override object.GetHashCode
public override int GetHashCode()
{
    // TODO: write your implementation of GetHashCode() here
    throw new NotImplementedException();
    return base.GetHashCode();
}
share|improve this answer
    
this doesn't answer the question. Please correct it or delete it.. –  nawfal Dec 17 '12 at 14:10
    
I believe it does answer the question. In answer to the question "how do you handle null values", the snippet answers "return false". –  David Yaw Dec 17 '12 at 15:02
    
Sorry for being harsh, my mistake, but seriously, the catch here is when handling null values inside operator overloading and that is the question too. Even if OP does what you do, it can still give null reference exception inside overloaded == or !=. –  nawfal Dec 17 '12 at 15:10

How about

public static bool operator == ( Effect a, Effect b )     
{  
    return object.Equals(a, b);
}

The default implementation of Object.Equals() does the null checking for you.

In case you're curious, here's how Object.Equals() does it (courtesy of .NET Reflector):

public static bool Equals(object objA, object objB)
{
    return ((objA == objB) || (((objA != null) && (objB != null)) && objA.Equals(objB)));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, when I used a null value my type threw a null ref exception. –  Joan Venge Feb 1 '11 at 21:16
    
See the comments to your question - overriding == and != is not something to be done lightly :) –  Doug Feb 1 '11 at 21:24
    
Thanks, I didn't pay attention to the first part of your message. –  Joan Venge Feb 1 '11 at 21:32

It is necessary to check for nulls with every method that takes parameters making your class.

public class Effect
{
    public static bool operator == ( Effect a, Effect b )
    {
        if (a == null) && (b == null) return true;
            if (a == null) return false;
            return a.Equals ( b );
    }

    public static bool operator != ( Effect a, Effect b )
    {
        return !(a == b);
    }

    public bool Equals ( Effect effect )
    {
            if (b == null) return false;
        return this.TypeID.Equals ( effect.TypeID );
    }

    public override bool Equals ( object obj )
    {
            if (obj == null) return false;
        return this.TypeID.Equals ( ( ( Effect ) obj ).TypeID );
    }
}

Other things to look out for are GetHashCode which should be implemented if equality is being implemented and the fact that GetHashCode should only be implemented on immutable properties, if this object is going to be used in a dictionary or similar object that compares items using the hash code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, also this wouldn't compile, right? (return !a == b;)? –  Joan Venge Feb 1 '11 at 21:21
    
My mistake I missed a pair of brackets, I must be too used to the crutch of an IDE. I've changed it to !(a == b); –  Spencer Booth Feb 1 '11 at 21:27
    
Np man, I am used to the IDE too much too :O –  Joan Venge Feb 1 '11 at 21:31
    
-1, this creates infinite recursion and never really works at all. See stackoverflow.com/questions/73713/… –  nawfal Dec 16 '12 at 9:07

Yes, you should chech against null. Why are you afraid of that?

Remember that when you play around with equals, you probably also want to take a look at the hashcode method! Those two methods are intertwined.

share|improve this answer

Add this:

 public static bool operator == ( Effect a, Effect b )     
 {  
     return a is Effect && b is Effect && a.TypeID.Equals (b.TypeID);    
 }  
 public static bool operator != ( Effect a, Effect b )
 {         
     return !(a == b );     
 }      
 public bool Equals ( Effect effect )     
 {         
    return this == effect );     
 }      
 public override bool Equals ( object obj )     
 {   
    return obj is Effect && this == obj); 
 } 

or instead of last put:

 public override bool Equals ( object obj )     
 {   
    if (obj == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(
         "obj", "obj is null");
    if (!(obj is effect)) throw new ArgumentException(
         "obj", "obj is not an effect");
    return obj is Effect && this == obj); 
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
Better be careful, though. == requires you to also define !=. This could potentially result in mutual recursion. –  Dan Tao Feb 1 '11 at 21:12
1  
If you do use that code it will be necessary to add the equivalent to the != method. –  Spencer Booth Feb 1 '11 at 21:13
    
sorry, wasn't done... –  Charles Bretana Feb 1 '11 at 21:14
2  
This will introduce a stack overflow, no? == calls !=, != calls ==, etc... –  Chris Shain Feb 1 '11 at 21:14
1  
@Charles: Chris is right; this is going to overflow. –  Dan Tao Feb 1 '11 at 21:15

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