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I have a fixed size circular buffer (implemented as an array): upon initialization, the buffer gets filled with the specified maximum number of elements which allows the use of a single position index in order to keep track of our current position in the circle.

What is an efficient way to access an element in the circular buffer? Here is my current solution:

int GetElement(int index)
{
    if (index >= buffer_size || index < 0)
    {
        // some code to handle the case
    }
    else
    {
        // wrap the index
        index = end_index + index >= buffer_size ? (index + end_index) - buffer_size : end_index + index;
    }

    return buffer[index];
}

Some definitions:
end_index is the index of the element immediately after the last element in the circle (it would also be considered the same as the start_index, or the first element of the circle).
buffer_size is the maximum size of the buffer.

share|improve this question
    
When isn't end_index equal to buffer_size? – Fred Nurk Feb 2 '11 at 9:42
    
@Fred, when you add an element to the circular buffer... the index wraps every time you go past the buffer_size. – Lirik Feb 2 '11 at 18:14
    
@Lirik: I must be missing something. – Fred Nurk Feb 2 '11 at 18:20
    
@Fred, the gist of a Circular Buffer is that your new data overwrites your old data and you need to keep track of where you are in the circle. It uses an array to mimic a circle, so end_index tells us the position of the last element (or the element after the last element). The buffer_size might be 100, but we only have 13 elements, therefore end_index is 14. If I already have 100 elements, the end_index is 99 and if I add one more element, the end_index will wrap around to 0. Mine works like a queue, except I have O(1) access to every element. – Lirik Feb 2 '11 at 18:49
    
@Lirik: Ah, so the buffer isn't always filled? I thought it was from "the buffer gets filled with the specified maximum number of elements". – Fred Nurk Feb 2 '11 at 18:53
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Ensure that the buffer is always a power of two long and mask out the top bits.

share|improve this answer
1  
So... modulus/modulo? :P – Jonathan Grynspan Feb 1 '11 at 21:26
4  
@Johnatan: A prematurely optimized modulo operation, yes. – delnan Feb 1 '11 at 21:35
    
@delnan I don't know about prematurely. While personally I'd use modulo, it's actually very common practice to have arrays be powers of two for this reason. – corsiKa Feb 1 '11 at 22:14
    
@Jonathan, what he's doing at the moment is already prematurely optimised modulo. I'm just suggesting the logical extreme. :P – Peter Taylor Feb 1 '11 at 22:19
1  
I tested the modulus version vs the top-bit-mask and they're both equal. It seems that the modulus is more robust since it doesn't require the buffer_size to be a power of 2. – Lirik Feb 5 '11 at 7:10

Best I've come up with is:

public static int Wrap(int a, int n)
{
    return ((a % n) + n) % n;
}

(Assuming you need to work with negative numbers)

share|improve this answer

It'll depend somewhat on the processor, but it's probably at least worth trying something like return (end_index + index) % buffer_size;

share|improve this answer
    
(1) Is end_index not equal to buffer_size (assuming a 0-indexed array)? (2) With that in mind, let's simplify this to return (a + n) % n; -- then if a = -5, and n = 4, then (a+n) yields -1, which is still out of bounds. (i.e., it fails for a < -n). – mpen Apr 17 '12 at 3:24
1  
@Mark: although the original code implies the possibility of negative numbers, that's normally just not allowed at all (though it's probably better to use an unsigned type to ensure against it). – Jerry Coffin Apr 17 '12 at 3:57
    
Oh... I guess my situation is different. I often use -1 to mean the last element. – mpen Apr 17 '12 at 3:59
    
@Mark: in that case, you'd just about have to clamp the value a bit differently, something like: ` int clamp(int val, int max) { while (val < 0) val += max; while (val >= max) val -= max; return val; }` – Jerry Coffin Apr 17 '12 at 4:02
1  
@Mark: if your value might be drastically out of bounds, then a remainder is likely to be faster. If you just want to handle something like -max..max*2 (or so), then the while loops are probably faster (taking a remainder isn't particularly fast on most processors). – Jerry Coffin Apr 17 '12 at 4:05
int GetElement(int index)
{
    return buffer[(end_index + index) % buffer_size];
}

See modulo operation for the more information on the modulus operator (%).

share|improve this answer

I tested all 3 versions:

// plain wrap
public static int WrapIndex(int index, int endIndex, int maxSize)
{
    return (endIndex + index) > maxSize ? (endIndex + index) - maxSize : endIndex + index;
}

// wrap using mod
public static int WrapIndexMod(int index, int endIndex, int maxSize)
{
    return (endIndex + index) % maxSize;
}

// wrap by masking out the top bits
public static int WrapIndexMask(int index, int endIndex, int maxSize)
{
    return (endIndex + index) & (maxSize - 1);
}

The performance results (ticks):

Plain: 25 Mod: 16 Mask: 16 (maxSize = 512)
Plain: 25 Mod: 17 Mask: 17 (maxSize = 1024)
Plain: 25 Mod: 17 Mask: 17 (maxSize = 4096)

So it seems that the modulus is the better choice, because it does not require any restriction on the size of the buffer.

share|improve this answer

FWIW, you could always do a parallel array: i = next[i];

But, really, I've always just done this: i++; if (i >= n) i = 0; OR i = (i+1) % n;

Regardless, I'd be really surprised if this is ever a significant performance issue.

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