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I'm working with single-tier, single-user applications, with FluentNHibernate. With multiple threads, triggered by time triggers and incoming socket message triggers.

What requirements will determine if I can create/dispose the ISession inside each method of the repositories, or if I need to maintain the ISession lifecycle over multiple calls, maybe from program start to end?

For example, does lazy-load require session to be maintained? And if I don't use lazyload, for what other reason should I maintain the ISession?

Currently my repository methods look like below, but I wonder if I'm doing it wrong..

public class ProductRepository
{
    public void Delete(Product product)
    {
        using (ISession session = FNH_Manager.OpenSession())
        {
            using (ITransaction transaction = session.BeginTransaction())
            {
                session.Delete(product);
                transaction.Commit();
            }
        }
    }

class FNH_Manager
{
    private static Configuration cfg;
    private static ISessionFactory sessionFactory;

    public static void ConfigureSessionFactory()
    {
        sessionFactory = CreateSessionFactory();
    }

    public static ISession OpenSession()
    {
        return sessionFactory.OpenSession();
    }

EDIT1: Attempt to handle "session per call":

   public class EmployeeRepository
   {  
        public static void Delete(Employee employee)
        {
            using (ISession session = FNH_Manager.OpenSession())
            {
                using (ITransaction transaction = session.BeginTransaction())
                {
                    if (Employee.Id != 0)
                    {
                      var emp =  session.Get(typeof(Employee), employee.Id);
                      if (emp != null)
                      {
                        session.Delete(emp);
                        transaction.Commit();
                      }
                    }
                }
            }
        } 
share|improve this question
    
Save yourself the pain and just implement a unit of work to mange the session. It will likely end up actually being LESS code, and it will scale up if the application ever gets more complex to where you need to facilitate complex interactions between multiple entities retrieved from different repositories. –  Brook Feb 1 '11 at 21:54
    
@Brook - The session is ALREADY a unit of work. –  Phill Feb 1 '11 at 23:47
    
@Phil - It is, but it isn't going to automatically wrap a group of changes for you. For that I would typically wrap it in a class which scoped it to a specific web or wcf request, and call that a unit of work. The other thing is that I typically don't want those parts of the application having a dependency on NH, so a wrapper allows you to decouple that too. –  Brook Feb 2 '11 at 1:38
    
Ok I get what you're saying, makes more sense now. –  Phill Feb 2 '11 at 2:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The session must be open when you reference a lazy-loaded field, so if you're relying on lazy-loading outside of your repository you'll need to manage the session lifespan somewhere higher up.

If you don't use lazy-loading, there's also the matter of whether you need to support multiple actions in one transaction. For example, if you delete a product AND some other data in one go, you'd want that to happen in one transaction in the same session (otherwise you might delete the product, have some code throw some exception, and never delete the other data, which may end up with orphan records or a corrupt state in your database).

share|improve this answer

I think you should use UnitOfWork pattern per thread. On thread start create ISession and initialize UnitOfWork with it. Repositories use UnitOfWork with that signle ISession. At the end of thread execution commit the changes or rollback if there was conflict with other threads.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not really sure how to implement that, each thread can initiate a series of events all over my business logic, which at various places may trigger a save to the database. I'm not sure how to keep "hold on to" a session in that perspective. - So it looks easier for me to start out with "session per call", unless this has some inherent problems with multiple threads..? –  bretddog Feb 2 '11 at 1:27
    
@bretdog A common way to manage session scope is to allow a dependency injection container such as StructureMap or Ninject to handle that for you. Any modern container will have facilities to manage "per thread", "per request", "singleton" for you, so you don't have to worry about it. –  Brook Feb 2 '11 at 1:42
    
@Brook: You see these words "dependency injection" and even "container" are not yet things I know what means. Maybe vaguely when you consider a single class, that it could hold a session field(?) which we could inject a session, but I'm not sure like what class that should be, since a large number of classes are involved in a thread operation, and many classes can hit the database. So I don't really know how to approach that. Hence my motivation for "session per call", as a start. –  bretddog Feb 2 '11 at 2:11
    
@bretdog: I think you're going to find problems pretty quickly with session per call. You're basically giving up the ability to use transactions to keep your database in a consistent state. Lazy loading is likely going to continue to be an issue as the sessions won't be scoped properly. To me it seems like it would be worth it to learn a better way up front. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa973811.aspx –  Brook Feb 2 '11 at 2:31
    
I want to if it's justified, but I have a mountain of things to accomplish, so need to prioritize. Though I DO want to hear it if there are compelling reasons; but lazy-loading I will not use.. So I can't really see then what is the point for me? I mean many DALs work with DTOs, so can it be that hard to handle detached entities? In my eyes it still seems like the less complex solution. –  bretddog Feb 2 '11 at 2:43

The Product is not associated with any session when beeing deleted. It is a so called detached object. To use it within the session for example deleting it you need to first associate it with the currently opened session. There are several ways to achive this:

  1. Keep the session open. If the same session is opened when the Product is loaded as when it is deleted, it will work fine.
  2. Reload the object, but using ISession.Get() or ISession.Load().
  3. Re-attach the object to the newly opened session session with ISession.Lock()

Otherwise you'll probably get StaleStateExceptions and the like.

Remeber to read up on the NHibernate documentation

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! These 3 points were really helpful! I also read the documentation, so understand more now. Does my edit above look ok for this purpose? And with ISession.Lock; did you mean this is what I shall use for detached instance in repository's Update method? As it seems not to be related to "delete", if I understand the documentation correct? –  bretddog Feb 2 '11 at 2:00
    
Glad to help! The edit look Ok, although it is considered best practice to increase the scope of the session so that the first load and the delete are in the same session. This first load occurs before the code example begins when the Product is first fetched from the database. The name of the ISession.Lock method is not very good. It will reattach the entity so that operations can yet again be performed on it. Such as delete. –  vidstige Feb 2 '11 at 15:42
    
Yes. I'm trying to understand and learn the tricks of session-per-call now as a first step. I think that's valuable learning experience. About the LOCK: I think it only accepts "unmodified" object, and if I'm not mistaken, otherwise throws Isdirty exception. Hence it seemed more robust to use Get. Though that hits the database, but probably one can not avoid that with such local session scope. –  bretddog Feb 2 '11 at 22:06
    
sounds good! Yup, the Lock method will throw if the objects differ. This usually indicates a logic error elsewhere. It's less robust in the sense that a error message may appear in case of a conflict, but more robust in another sense since using the Get-method will always overwrite data in the database. If the narrow session-scope cannot be avoided and detached objects may change by design (I've seen this in rare circumstances) the ISession.Merge might help you as a last resort. Remeber that the passed detached entity is not re-attached but a persisted entity is returned. –  vidstige Feb 3 '11 at 7:36

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