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Alright. I am using boost::shared_ptr to store a couple of objects in a map. Integer values maps to shared_ptrs to objects that I am using.

void HandlerMsgHandler::addHandler(uint8_t key, boost::shared_ptr<NetworkHandler> handler) 
{
    handlers[key] = handler; 
}

This code blows up in valgrind, look below for the error message. If you look at the beginning of the method chain, you can see that in the UdpServer class I forward the addHandler request from my testclass into an inner class called HandlerMsgHandler.

This is how that method looks like:

void UdpServer::addHandler(uint8_t key, boost::shared_ptr<NetworkHandler> handler)
{
    dynamic_cast<HandlerMsgHandler*>(sysMsgHandlers[network::handler])->addHandler(key, handler);
}

And the callsite:

server.addHandler(1, boost::shared_ptr<net::NetworkHandler>(new _NetworkHandler(networkHandlerFailed)));
server.addHandler(2, boost::shared_ptr<net::NetworkHandler>(new SimpleIntMessageHandler(simpleIntFailed)));

I need to cast because I have client message handlers, and network/system message handlers which handle certain other cases such as errors. The HandlerMsgHandler is invoked when a valid message has been sent to a client NetworkHandler.

I'm not sure how much you need to know about the design, perhaps the mistake is obvious to you?

UPDATE:

sysMsgHandlers is declared as std::map<SysMessage, NetworkHandler*> sysMsgHandlers;, while the sysMsgHandlers are initiated internally as such:

sysMsgHandlers[handler] = new HandlerMsgHandler();
sysMsgHandlers[error] = new ErrorMsgHandler();

I don't use any fancy pointer types here since it's all internal. I iterate over the sysMsgHandlers map and delete the pointers (I have verified that this happens).

UPDATE 2:

More info. I am deleting the object containing the map.

I have this code in my UdpServer destructor:

for(auto iter = sysMsgHandlers.begin(); iter != sysMsgHandlers.end(); iter++)
{
LOG("MsgHandlers deleted");
delete iter->second;
}

This gives the following output to std::cout: (among a few other debug messages)

 : Listening started
 : Connecting to socket : 1
 : Sending message
 : Received in buffer
 : Received : 24 bytes.
 : Sys msg = 1
 : Handling request to: 1
 : Stopping manager
 : MsgHandlers deleted
 : MsgHandlers deleted

And this is still the valgrind output:

==26633== 192 (56 direct, 136 indirect) bytes in 1 blocks are definitely lost in loss record 21 of 35
==26633==    at 0x4C28973: operator new(unsigned long) (vg_replace_malloc.c:261)
==26633==    by 0x4258AF: __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<std::_Rb_tree_node<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > > >::allocate(unsigned long, void const*) (new_allocator.h:89)
==26633==    by 0x4257A7: std::_Rb_tree<unsigned char, std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > >, std::less<unsigned char>, std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > > >::_M_get_node() (stl_tree.h:359)
==26633==    by 0x425622: std::_Rb_tree_node<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > >* std::_Rb_tree<unsigned char, std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > >, std::less<unsigned char>, std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > > >::_M_create_node<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > const&>(std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > const&&&) (stl_tree.h:391)
==26633==    by 0x42526E: std::_Rb_tree<unsigned char, std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > >, std::less<unsigned char>, std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > > >::_M_insert_(std::_Rb_tree_node_base const*, std::_Rb_tree_node_base const*, std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > const&) (stl_tree.h:881)
==26633==    by 0x4253ED: std::_Rb_tree<unsigned char, std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > >, std::less<unsigned char>, std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > > >::_M_insert_unique(std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > const&) (stl_tree.h:1177)
==26633==    by 0x424CA9: std::_Rb_tree<unsigned char, std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > >, std::less<unsigned char>, std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > > >::_M_insert_unique_(std::_Rb_tree_const_iterator<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > >, std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > const&) (stl_tree.h:1217)
==26633==    by 0x424931: std::map<unsigned char, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler>, std::less<unsigned char>, std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > > >::insert(std::_Rb_tree_iterator<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > >, std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > const&) (stl_map.h:540)
==26633==    by 0x42463E: std::map<unsigned char, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler>, std::less<unsigned char>, std::allocator<std::pair<unsigned char const, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler> > > >::operator[](unsigned char const&) (stl_map.h:450)
==26633==    by 0x424163: chat::server::network::HandlerMsgHandler::addHandler(unsigned char, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler>) (sysnetworkhandler.cpp:19)
==26633==    by 0x4120F1: chat::server::network::UdpServer::addHandler(unsigned char, boost::shared_ptr<chat::server::network::NetworkHandler>) (udpserver.cpp:38)
==26633==    by 0x404938: chat::test::server::testCanSendToSelf(bool&) (main.cpp:95)
share|improve this question
    
are you sure this map is cleared when your program terminates? –  Sam Miller Feb 1 '11 at 22:26
    
@Sam I think so. Is that the same as the containing object being deleted? I have verified that I delete the HandlerMsgHandler, and it contains the map as a normal member. –  Max Feb 1 '11 at 22:30
    
Check my comments on my answer. The most probable cause is that sysMsgHandlers[handler] returns an ErrorMsgHandler instance. –  vz0 Feb 1 '11 at 22:32
    
Updated answer. –  vz0 Feb 2 '11 at 11:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An std::map is a Red-Black Tree, and valgrind complains about the allocation of an std::_Rb_tree_node<std::pair<..., ...> >. The node of the map's tree is the one leaking.

I guess this cast must be related to the leak:

dynamic_cast<HandlerMsgHandler*>(sysMsgHandlers[network::handler])->addHandler(key, handler);

Are you sure that the expression sysMsgHandlers[network::handler] returns a pointer (and not a boost::shared_ptr) to HandlerMsgHandler?

EDIT: The next most probable cause is that sysMsgHandlers[handler] returns an ErrorMsgHandler instance.

EDIT, 2 Feb: Is your NetworkHandler destructor virtual? If not, the destructor of map<uint8_t boost::shared_ptr<NetworkHandler> > handlers won't get called and you'd have a leak of the map's node there.

Check out the C++ FAQ.

Q: When should my destructor be virtual?

A: When someone will delete a derived-class object via a base-class pointer. When you say delete p, and the class of p has a virtual destructor, the destructor that gets invoked is the one associated with the type of the object *p, not necessarily the one associated with the type of the pointer. This is A Good Thing.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. sysMsgHandlers is of type std::map<SysMessage, NetworkHandler*>. I'll update the question in a second to add some information about that. One second. Thanks! –  Max Feb 1 '11 at 22:21
    
Is network::handler an enum? Is network::handler != network::error ? I put my bet on it. –  vz0 Feb 1 '11 at 22:31
    
Hey thanks for more input! But the thing is, if that were the case I would get errors reported through valgrind. Right? This is actually a unit test which succeeds with all the proper handlers being called, which definately wouldn't happen if I returned ErrorMsgHandler? –  Max Feb 1 '11 at 22:37
    
You are welcome, this sounds quite interesting! Valgrind works by hooking the new and delete operators, and (sort-of) creating a bitmap of all the allocated memory blocks. But if you make a wrong cast, valgrind won't notice it: *((double*)(new int)) = 2.0d; –  vz0 Feb 1 '11 at 22:40
1  
This was absolutely correct. Blargh. I actually thought (and I think it was a little reasonable) that delete figured out the type of the memory from when it was initialized, and so any instance variables was destructed (of course the destructor of my object would not be called, but since it nothing explicit...). Thanks! –  Max Feb 2 '11 at 17:15

More often than not, when I've seen a memory leak that points to memory allocated inside a container it is either that the rule of the three is not been followed and memory is leaked by the contained element, or else that the whole container is leaked.

In your particular case, it looks more like the container it self is being leaked. Something like:

int main() {
   std::map<int,std::string> *p = new std::map<int,std::string>(); // [*]
   p->insert( std::make_pair( 1, "one" ) );
}
// leaked memory allocated internally in std::map<int,std::string>

Note that the code marked with [*] need not be so obvious. The map can be a member of a class that is being dynamically allocated and never deleted.

share|improve this answer
    
I also thought it might be something like this, but check my update! Maybe I missed something and I am abusing the iterators! sysMsgHandlers contains two objects, and as my output says they are both deleted! One of them is the HandlerMsgHandler, which contains the guilty map. –  Max Feb 1 '11 at 22:53
    
With just so few lines of actual code, there is not much that can be done from our side. The common advices, ensure that no other object that contains the map is created and that you do not miss deleting some of those containers. You can add a simple utility class with CRTP like: template <typename T> struct counter { counter() { s_counter++; }; ~counter() { --s_counter; } static int s_counter; } template <typename T> int counter<T>::s_counter = 0; to track the number of objects that are being created (if you want to check how many test objects are alive: struct test : counter<test> {... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 2 '11 at 9:09
    
And then at any given time print the value: std::cout << counter<test>::s_counter << " test objects alive" << std::endl; (or you might write debug traces on creation/destruction. Other than that, inspect the code is probably not the best advice --it is good, but I just assume that you have read it so many times that you are not actually reading anymore, that happens. Also consider that some standard containers will keep memory in allocators instead of returning it back to the system... but my guess is that those should be marked as possibly lost instead of definitely lost by valgrind. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 2 '11 at 9:12
    
(You can also write a simple test for this, create a test.cpp file where you just create a std::map<std::string, std::string> (or similar) in main. Add a few elements, and return from main. Check with valgrind whether it thinks that you are leaking memory. In a simple limited example it is easy to manually check whether valgrind believes that you leak (it is easy to check for correctness if you just have a few lines of code. Alternatively, try to blindly patch the code by converting all raw pointers into smart pointers, and ensuring that all resources are managed by RAII at all times. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 2 '11 at 9:14
    
Thanks man! You were spot on, even if the reason was that my baseclass destructor wasn't virtual. Gave you an upvote, even though I accepted the other guys since he fingered the virtual problem. –  Max Feb 2 '11 at 18:18

Like vz0 said, it is the map's node that is leaking, not the handler.

Is this the only error valgrind is reporting? Valgrind report some direct leaking, so you are probably deleting/clearing the map when the program finish, but are you sure your program is not accessing out side the bound of any array or writing on uninitialized data (special care with pointers here)?

I have had a similar problem before, it happened to be a buffer overflow which was messing with the map.

Note: Dynamic cast checks at runtime if the value can be cast to that type, if it cannot, it return NULL. If you will not check if the return of dynamic_cast is NULL, then use static_cast, which is faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I'll have to look into this... I'll try to use ordinary pointers which I delete manually, if there is any overflows they should still be showing themselves then, right? –  Max Feb 1 '11 at 22:55
    
If the overflow access only memory used by your program (even if it was not for that specific buffer), but if it overwrite the map memory and access non alloc memory, then valgrind should show it. Before quitting the application (or deleting the object that hold the map), check if the map has all the elements it should have, it may help to find the problem. –  fbafelipe Feb 2 '11 at 15:57

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