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R determines panel order in xyplot() by alphabetic order (for strings), or level order (for factors). I have dates as text which I would like to display in chronological order, rather than alphabetical order.

x <- sample(1:10, 10, replace = TRUE)
y <- sample(1:10, 10, replace = TRUE)
# overlapping 2010 and 2011
date <- rep(as.Date("2010-01-01") + sort(sample(200:400, 5)), each = 2)
striptext <- format(date, "%d-%b ...")
df <- data.frame(x, y, date, striptext)

This works fine:

xyplot(y ~ x | date, data = df)

But this puts the dates out of order:

xyplot(y ~ x | striptext, data = df)

I don't want the full date in the strips, but I do want them in correct order. Is there any solution besides making striptext an ordered factor?

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1  
The main point I think you are missing is that striptext is being coerced to a factor inside xyplot and if levels aren't supplied, the levels of the resulting factor are in alpha order. Consider levels(factor(striptext)) and levels(factor(striptext, levels = unique(striptext))). Real answer to your Q is get your conditioning variable set-up first as a factor with the levels ordered the way you want them. –  Gavin Simpson Feb 1 '11 at 22:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Set the levels of striptext explicitly and store it as a factor so that lattice doesn't have to do the coercion for you (which is where the levels end up in alpha order):

set.seed(1)
x <- sample(1:10, 10, replace = TRUE)
y <- sample(1:10, 10, replace = TRUE)
# overlapping 2010 and 2011
date <- rep(as.Date("2010-01-01") + sort(sample(200:400, 5)), each = 2)
striptext <- format(date, "%d-%b ...")
## set the levels explicitly
df <- data.frame(x, y, date, 
                 striptext = factor(striptext, levels = unique(striptext)))
xyplot(y ~ x | striptext, data = df)
share|improve this answer
    
That's it. By default factor will sort the levels, but unique leaves them in the order they are found. –  J. Won. Feb 2 '11 at 0:35

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