Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Building an XML tree from an Array of "strings/that/are/paths" (in Ruby)

Refering to the question given in the above link, i am looking for a similar implementation in C#.

Can anyone help me get the code to do that.

share|improve this question
2  
Why don't you try it out yourself and come back if you have a specific problem? – Ed S. Feb 1 '11 at 23:41

Here's how I would do it. I'd certainly appreciate any feedback from others.

var paths = new[]
                        {
                            "nodeA1",
                            "nodeA1/nodeB1/nodeC1",
                            "nodeA1/nodeB1/nodeC1/nodeD1/nodeE1",
                            "nodeA1/nodeB1/nodeC2",
                            "nodeA1/nodeB2/nodeC2"
                        };

var xml = new XElement("xml");

foreach (var path in paths)
{
    var parts = path.Split('/');
    var current = xml;
    foreach (var part in parts)
    {
        if (current.Element(part) == null)
        {
            current.Add(new XElement(part));
        }
        current = current.Element(part);
    }
}

var result = xml.ToString();

This prints the following:

<xml>
  <nodeA1>
    <nodeB1>
      <nodeC1>
        <nodeD1>
          <nodeE1 />
        </nodeD1>
      </nodeC1>
      <nodeC2 />
    </nodeB1>
    <nodeB2>
      <nodeC2 />
    </nodeB2>
  </nodeA1>
</xml>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This is giving me an error while running the code in visual studio. Also what changes should be made to include the duplicates paths also. like if i have two paths like "nodeA1/nodeB1/nodeC2", "nodeA1/nodeB1/nodeC2". I would appreciate if you can help me with this. – user599198 Feb 6 '11 at 20:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.