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In a web application that makes use of AJAX calls, I need to submit a request but add a parameter to the end of the URL, for example:

Original URL:

http://server/myapp.php?id=10

Resulting URL:

http://server/myapp.php?id=10&enabled=true

Looking for a JavaScript function which parses the URL looking at each parameter, then adds the new parameter or updates the value if one already exists.

share|improve this question
    
Have you searched for javascript url parsers ? You could make your own, splitting on every &-character, but it's probably easier just to use existing code. –  csl Jan 28 '09 at 8:38
    
I had a similar scenario once and I found this article by Peter Bromberg very helpful : –  Cerebrus Jan 28 '09 at 9:01
1  
possible duplicate of Change URL parameters –  Sindre Sorhus Nov 15 '13 at 17:26

14 Answers 14

up vote 77 down vote accepted

A basic implementation which you'll need to adapt would look something like this:

function insertParam(key, value)
{
    key = encodeURI(key); value = encodeURI(value);

    var kvp = document.location.search.substr(1).split('&');

    var i=kvp.length; var x; while(i--) 
    {
        x = kvp[i].split('=');

        if (x[0]==key)
        {
            x[1] = value;
            kvp[i] = x.join('=');
            break;
        }
    }

    if(i<0) {kvp[kvp.length] = [key,value].join('=');}

    //this will reload the page, it's likely better to store this until finished
    document.location.search = kvp.join('&'); 
}

This is approximately twice as fast as a regex or search based solution, but that depends completely on the length of the querystring and the index of any match


the slow regex method I benchmarked against for completions sake (approx +150% slower)

function insertParam2(key,value)
{
    key = encodeURI(key); value = encodeURI(value);

    var s = document.location.search;
    var kvp = key+"="+value;

    var r = new RegExp("(&|\\?)"+key+"=[^\&]*");

    s = s.replace(r,"$1"+kvp);

    if(!RegExp.$1) {s += (s.length>0 ? '&' : '?') + kvp;};

    //again, do what you will here
    document.location.search = s;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
thanks again. see lessanvaezi.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/test.html for a basic comparison of the methods –  Lessan Vaezi Jan 28 '09 at 20:13
4  
Using escape() to escape URL parameters is wrong. It breaks for values with "+" in them. You should be using encodeURIComponent instead. Full discussion: xkr.us/articles/javascript/encode-compare –  Darwin Jun 9 '11 at 17:52
3  
I am calling this function and the page is reloading in infinite loop. Please help! –  iSumitG Jul 24 '11 at 16:34
1  
What about hashtags? –  skerit Aug 5 '11 at 8:55
1  
when no parameters are already in the url you get a ?&param=value –  Roy Toledo Aug 23 '12 at 12:44

Thank you all for your contribution. I used annakata code and modified to also include the case where there is no query string in the url at all. Hope this would help.

function insertParam(key, value) {
        key = escape(key); value = escape(value);

        var kvp = document.location.search.substr(1).split('&');
        if (kvp == '') {
            document.location.search = '?' + key + '=' + value;
        }
        else {

            var i = kvp.length; var x; while (i--) {
                x = kvp[i].split('=');

                if (x[0] == key) {
                    x[1] = value;
                    kvp[i] = x.join('=');
                    break;
                }
            }

            if (i < 0) { kvp[kvp.length] = [key, value].join('='); }

            //this will reload the page, it's likely better to store this until finished
            document.location.search = kvp.join('&');
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Needs a question mark before the key. Also you used double-quotes which is inconsistent with annakata's code. –  Muhd Dec 1 '11 at 2:47
    
Edited to address my concerns. –  Muhd Dec 1 '11 at 2:48
    
Nice! seems to work just fine! –  Roy Toledo Aug 23 '12 at 12:49

I have a 'class' that does this and here it is:

function QS(){
    this.qs = {};
    var s = location.search.replace( /^\?|#.*$/g, '' );
    if( s ) {
        var qsParts = s.split('&');
        var i, nv;
        for (i = 0; i < qsParts.length; i++) {
            nv = qsParts[i].split('=');
            this.qs[nv[0]] = nv[1];
        }
    }
}

QS.prototype.add = function( name, value ) {
    if( arguments.length == 1 && arguments[0].constructor == Object ) {
        this.addMany( arguments[0] );
        return;
    }
    this.qs[name] = value;
}

QS.prototype.addMany = function( newValues ) {
    for( nv in newValues ) {
        this.qs[nv] = newValues[nv];
    }
}

QS.prototype.remove = function( name ) {
    if( arguments.length == 1 && arguments[0].constructor == Array ) {
        this.removeMany( arguments[0] );
        return;
    }
    delete this.qs[name];
}

QS.prototype.removeMany = function( deleteNames ) {
    var i;
    for( i = 0; i < deleteNames.length; i++ ) {
        delete this.qs[deleteNames[i]];
    }
}

QS.prototype.getQueryString = function() {
    var nv, q = [];
    for( nv in this.qs ) {
        q[q.length] = nv+'='+this.qs[nv];
    }
    return q.join( '&' );
}

QS.prototype.toString = QS.prototype.getQueryString;

//examples
//instantiation
var qs = new QS;
alert( qs );

//add a sinle name/value
qs.add( 'new', 'true' );
alert( qs );

//add multiple key/values
qs.add( { x: 'X', y: 'Y' } );
alert( qs );

//remove single key
qs.remove( 'new' )
alert( qs );

//remove multiple keys
qs.remove( ['x', 'bogus'] )
alert( qs );

I have overridden the toString method so there is no need to call QS::getQueryString, you can use QS::toString or, as I have done in the examples just rely on the object being coerced into a string.

share|improve this answer
    
I was not asking that much, thx meouw! –  Louis XIV Aug 27 at 14:54

This is very simple solution. Its doesn't control parameter existence, and it doesn't change existing value. It adds your parameter to end, so you can get latest value in your back-end code.

function addParameterToURL(param){
    _url = location.href;
    _url += (_url.split('?')[1] ? '&':'?') + param;
    return _url;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1: answer the title of the question (but not the question). still... it is what I need. –  Loda Aug 31 '11 at 10:07
2  
you should also account for "#" in the url.. here's some code slop: url = (url.indexOf("?") != -1 ? url.split("?")[0]+"?"+part+"&"+url.split("?")[1] : (url.indexOf("#") != -1 ? url.split("#")[0]+"?"+part+"#"+ url.split("#")[1] : url+'?'+part)); –  kanzure Feb 27 '12 at 22:51
1  
@kanzure this thing looks evil as hell, but it's exactly what I wanted. Thanks. –  Chad von Nau Sep 2 '12 at 2:44
    
why split the url to check for the existence of a single character? also don't forget to encode...something more like function appendQs(url, key, value) { return url + (url.indexOf('?') >= 0 ? "&" : '?') + encodeURIComponent(key) + "=" + encodeURIComponent(value); }; –  drzaus May 30 at 18:39

Here's a vastly simplified version, making tradeoffs for legibility and fewer lines of code instead of micro-optimized performance (and we're talking about a few miliseconds difference, realistically... due to the nature of this (operating on the current document's location), this will most likely be ran once on a page).

/**
* Add a URL parameter (or changing it if it already exists)
* @param {search} string  this is typically document.location.search
* @param {key}    string  the key to set
* @param {val}    string  value 
*/
var addUrlParam = function(search, key, val){
  var newParam = key + '=' + val,
      params = '?' + newParam;

  // If the "search" string exists, then build params from it
  if (search) {
    // Try to replace an existance instance
    params = search.replace(new RegExp('[\?&]' + key + '[^&]*'), '$1' + newParam);

    // If nothing was replaced, then add the new param to the end
    if (params === search) {
      params += '&' + newParam;
    }
  }

  return params;
};

You would then use this like so:

document.location.pathname + addUrlParam(document.location.search, 'foo', 'bar');
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for this –  Roch Aug 4 '10 at 14:37
1  
+1 I like how you can specify something other than document.location.search –  Muhd Nov 29 '11 at 1:06
2  
Except that '$1' doesn't work. –  Muhd Dec 1 '11 at 1:08
    
+1 Awesome, I agree that legibility is more important than micro-optimization in this case and I'm glad to see someone took that approach. @Muhd Maybe that was a bug in the JS engine when you wrote that comment, but I just tested '$1' in this context and it works fine. –  JMTyler Feb 2 at 6:36

May be this can be another good solution, this new version replace the parameter if already exists.

function addParam(url, param, value) {
   var a = document.createElement('a'), regex = /[?&]([^=]+)=([^&]*)/g;
   var match, str = []; a.href = url; value=value||"";
   while (match = regex.exec(a.search))
       if (encodeURIComponent(param) != match[1]) str.push(match[1] + "=" + match[2]);
   str.push(encodeURIComponent(param) + "=" + encodeURIComponent(value));
   a.search = (a.search.substring(0,1) == "?" ? "" : "?") + str.join("&");
   return a.href;
}

url = "http://www.example.com#hashme";
newurl = addParam(url, "ciao", "1");
alert(newurl);

And please note that parameters should be encoded before being appended in query string.

http://jsfiddle.net/bknE4/60/

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Simple stupid solution –  cept0 Jul 12 '13 at 16:06
    
Small memory leak - you'll want to remove the anchor element that was added to the document before returning. –  hemp Oct 23 '13 at 22:21
    
@hemp Are you sure? The anchor isn't appended nor inserted to anything... –  freedev Oct 24 '13 at 1:09
    
@freedev, Nope, I'm not sure. ;) I'm having a hard time finding an authoritative source but the evidence suggests that you are correct. Since the created element is never attached to the DOM, it should be cleaned up once the variable goes out of scope. The DOM API isn't particularly well designed when it comes to side effects, so I'm overly cautious. –  hemp Oct 24 '13 at 3:52
    
Downvotes should be commented. –  freedev Nov 19 '13 at 7:52

This was my own attempt, but I'll use the answer by annakata as it seems much cleaner:

function AddUrlParameter(sourceUrl, parameterName, parameterValue, replaceDuplicates)
{
    if ((sourceUrl == null) || (sourceUrl.length == 0)) sourceUrl = document.location.href;
    var urlParts = sourceUrl.split("?");
    var newQueryString = "";
    if (urlParts.length > 1)
    {
    	var parameters = urlParts[1].split("&");
    	for (var i=0; (i < parameters.length); i++)
    	{
    		var parameterParts = parameters[i].split("=");
    		if (!(replaceDuplicates && parameterParts[0] == parameterName))
    		{
    			if (newQueryString == "")
    				newQueryString = "?";
    			else
    				newQueryString += "&";
    			newQueryString += parameterParts[0] + "=" + parameterParts[1];
    		}
    	}
    }
    if (newQueryString == "")
    	newQueryString = "?";
    else
    	newQueryString += "&";
    newQueryString += parameterName + "=" + parameterValue;

    return urlParts[0] + newQueryString;
}

Also, I found this jQuery plugin from another post on stackoverflow, and if you need more flexibility you could use that: http://plugins.jquery.com/project/query-object

I would think the code would be (haven't tested):

return $.query.parse(sourceUrl).set(parameterName, parameterValue).toString();
share|improve this answer

Check out https://code.google.com/p/jsuri/

Uri and query string manipulation in javascript.

This project incorporates the excellent parseUri regular expression library by Steven Levithan. You can safely parse URLs of all shapes and sizes, however invalid or hideous.

share|improve this answer

Ok here I compare Two functions, one made by myself (regExp) and another one made by (annakata).

Split array:

function insertParam(key, value)
{
    key = escape(key); value = escape(value);

    var kvp = document.location.search.substr(1).split('&');

    var i=kvp.length; var x; while(i--) 
    {
        x = kvp[i].split('=');

        if (x[0]==key)
        {
                x[1] = value;
                kvp[i] = x.join('=');
                break;
        }
    }

    if(i<0) {kvp[kvp.length] = [key,value].join('=');}

    //this will reload the page, it's likely better to store this until finished
    return "&"+kvp.join('&'); 
}

Regexp method:

function addParameter(param, value)
{
    var regexp = new RegExp("(\\?|\\&)" + param + "\\=([^\\&]*)(\\&|$)");
    if (regexp.test(document.location.search)) 
        return (document.location.search.toString().replace(regexp, function(a, b, c, d)
        {
                return (b + param + "=" + value + d);
        }));
    else 
        return document.location.search+ param + "=" + value;
}

Testing case:

time1=(new Date).getTime();
for (var i=0;i<10000;i++)
{
addParameter("test","test");
}
time2=(new Date).getTime();
for (var i=0;i<10000;i++)
{
insertParam("test","test");
}

time3=(new Date).getTime();

console.log((time2-time1)+" "+(time3-time2));

It seems that even with simplest solution (when regexp use only test and do not enter .replace function) it is still slower than spliting... Well. Regexp is kinda slow but... uhh...

share|improve this answer
    
as I mentioned, this is actually comparatively slow - and fwiw, document.location.search is clearer –  annakata Jan 28 '09 at 12:18

I like the answer of Mehmet Fatih Yıldız even he did not answer the whole question.

In the same line as his answer, I use this code:

"Its doesn't control parameter existence, and it doesn't change existing value. It adds your parameter to the end"

  /** add a parameter at the end of the URL. Manage '?'/'&', but not the existing parameters.
   *  does escape the value (but not the key)
   */
  function addParameterToURL(_url,_key,_value){
      var param = _key+'='+escape(_value);

      var sep = '&';
      if (_url.indexOf('?') < 0) {
        sep = '?';
      } else {
        var lastChar=_url.slice(-1);
        if (lastChar == '&') sep='';
        if (lastChar == '?') sep='';
      }
      _url += sep + param;

      return _url;
  }

and the tester:

  /*
  function addParameterToURL_TESTER_sub(_url,key,value){
    //log(_url);
    log(addParameterToURL(_url,key,value));
  }

  function addParameterToURL_TESTER(){
    log('-------------------');
    var _url ='www.google.com';
    addParameterToURL_TESTER_sub(_url,'key','value');
    addParameterToURL_TESTER_sub(_url,'key','Text Value');
    _url ='www.google.com?';
    addParameterToURL_TESTER_sub(_url,'key','value');
    _url ='www.google.com?A=B';
    addParameterToURL_TESTER_sub(_url,'key','value');
    _url ='www.google.com?A=B&';
    addParameterToURL_TESTER_sub(_url,'key','value');
    _url ='www.google.com?A=1&B=2';
    addParameterToURL_TESTER_sub(_url,'key','value');

  }//*/
share|improve this answer

I would go with this small but complete library to handle urls in js:

https://github.com/Mikhus/jsurl

share|improve this answer

Here is what I do. Using my editParams() function, you can add, remove, or change any parameter, then use the built in replaceState() function to update the URL:

window.history.replaceState('object or string', 'Title', 'page.html' + editParams('enable', 'true'));


// background functions below:

// add/change/remove URL parameter
// use a value of false to remove parameter
// returns a url-style string
function editParams (key, value) {
  key = encodeURI(key);

  var params = getSearchParameters();

  if (Object.keys(params).length === 0) {
    if (value !== false)
      return '?' + key + '=' + encodeURI(value);
    else
      return '';
  }

  if (value !== false)
    params[key] = encodeURI(value);
  else
    delete params[key];

  if (Object.keys(params).length === 0)
    return '';

  return '?' + $.map(params, function (value, key) {
    return key + '=' + value;
  }).join('&');
}

// Get object/associative array of URL parameters
function getSearchParameters () {
  var prmstr = window.location.search.substr(1);
  return prmstr !== null && prmstr !== "" ? transformToAssocArray(prmstr) : {};
}

// convert parameters from url-style string to associative array
function transformToAssocArray (prmstr) {
  var params = {},
      prmarr = prmstr.split("&");

  for (var i = 0; i < prmarr.length; i++) {
    var tmparr = prmarr[i].split("=");
    params[tmparr[0]] = tmparr[1];
  }
  return params;
}
share|improve this answer
var MyApp = new Class();

MyApp.extend({
    utility: {
        queryStringHelper: function (url) {
            var originalUrl = url;
            var newUrl = url;
            var finalUrl;
            var insertParam = function (key, value) {
                key = escape(key);
                value = escape(value);

                //The previous post had the substr strat from 1 in stead of 0!!!
                var kvp = newUrl.substr(0).split('&');

                var i = kvp.length;
                var x;
                while (i--) {
                    x = kvp[i].split('=');

                    if (x[0] == key) {
                        x[1] = value;
                        kvp[i] = x.join('=');
                        break;
                    }
                }

                if (i < 0) {
                    kvp[kvp.length] = [key, value].join('=');
                }

                finalUrl = kvp.join('&');

                return finalUrl;
            };

            this.insertParameterToQueryString = insertParam;

            this.insertParams = function (keyValues) {
                for (var keyValue in keyValues[0]) {
                    var key = keyValue;
                    var value = keyValues[0][keyValue];
                    newUrl = insertParam(key, value);
                }
                return newUrl;
            };

            return this;
        }
    }
});
share|improve this answer

If you're messing around with urls in links or somewhere else, you may have to take the hash into account as well. Here's a fairly simple to understand solution. Probably not the FASTEST since it uses a regex... but in 99.999% of cases, the difference really doesn't matter!

function addQueryParam( url, key, val ){
    var parts = url.match(/([^?#]+)(\?[^#]*)?(\#.*)?/);
    var url = parts[1];
    var qs = parts[2] || '';
    var hash = parts[3] || '';

    if ( !qs ) {
        return url + '?' + key + '=' + encodeURIComponent( val ) + hash;
    } else {
        var qs_parts = qs.substr(1).split("&");
        var i;
        for (i=0;i<qs_parts.length;i++) {
            var qs_pair = qs_parts[i].split("=");
            if ( qs_pair[0] == key ){
                qs_parts[ i ] = key + '=' + encodeURIComponent( val );
                break;
            }
        }
        if ( i == qs_parts.length ){
            qs_parts.push( key + '=' + encodeURIComponent( val ) );
        }
        return url + '?' + qs_parts.join('&') + hash;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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