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I'm having 2 issues when trying to print a pdf silently in C# using adobe acrobat. I'm printing the pdfs using Process.Start().

The first issue is that I cannot launch Adobe Acrobat without specifying the full path to the executable. I assume it doesn't add it to your path when you install it. Is there an easy way to launch the newest version of acrobat on a machine without specifying full path names? I'm worried that the client is going to do an update and break my code that launches this. I'm also concerned with them installing this on machines with different versions of windows (install paths are different in 64 bit environment vs. 32 bit).

My second problem is the fact that whenever I launch acrobat and print it still leaves the acrobat window open. I thought that the command line parameters I was using would suppress all of this but apparently not.

I'm trying to launch adobe acrobat from the command line with the following syntax:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Adobe\Reader 10.0\Reader>AcroRd32.exe /t "Label.pdf" "HP4000" "HP LaserJet 4100 Series PCL6" "out.pdf"

It prints out fine but it still leaves the acrobat window up. Is there any other solution besides going out and killing the process programmatically?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I ended up bailing on Adobe Acrobat here and going with FoxIt Reader (Free pdf reader) to do my pdf printing. This is the code I'm using to print via FoxIt in C#:

Process pdfProcess = new Process();
pdfProcess.StartInfo.FileName = @"C:\Program Files (x86)\Foxit Software\Foxit Reader\Foxit Reader.exe";
pdfProcess.StartInfo.Arguments = string.Format(@"-p {0}", fileNameToSave);
pdfProcess.Start();

The above code prints to the default printer but there are command line parameters you can use to specify file and printer. You can use the following syntax:

Foxit Reader.exe -t "pdf filename" "printer name"

Edit:

Apparently earlier versions of acrobat do not have the problem outlined above either. If you use a much older version (4.x or something similar) it does not exhibit this problem.

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This saves my life! I've tried so many things to print PDFs silenty ... the Adobe Reader via command line, a windows service invoking the Adobe Reader, some WinAPI trickery. With any approach either the Adobe Reader window came up or it simply didnt print. Thanks a lot for this hint! –  Wolfgang Steiner Feb 21 at 16:08

The following is tested in both Acrobat Reader 8.1.3 and Acrobat Pro 11.0.06, and the following functionality is confirmed:

  1. Locates the default Acrobat executable on the system
  2. Sends the file to the local printer
  3. Closes Acrobat, regardless of version

// Get the path of the Acrobat executable:
var printApplicationRegistryPath = "SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\App Paths\\Acrobat.exe;SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\App Paths\\AcroRD32.exe";
var tokens = printApplicationRegistryPath.Split(new[] { ';' });
var applicationPath = string.Empty;
foreach (var s in tokens)
{
    applicationPath = GetRegistryValue(s);
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(applicationPath))
    {
        break;
    }
}

// Print to Acrobat
const string flagNoSplashScreen = "/s";
const string flagOpenMinimized = "/h";

var flagPrintFileToPrinter = string.Format("/t \"{0}\" \"{1}\"", printFileName, printerName); 

var args = string.Format("{0} {1} {2}", flagNoSplashScreen, flagOpenMinimized, flagPrintFileToPrinter);

var startInfo = new ProcessStartInfo
{
    FileName = printApplicationPath, 
    Arguments = args, 
    CreateNoWindow = true, 
    ErrorDialog = false, 
    UseShellExecute = false, 
    WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden
};

var process = Process.Start(startInfo);

// Close Acrobat regardless of version
if (process != null)
{
    process.WaitForInputIdle();
    process.CloseMainWindow();
}
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This will not close the adobe reader window after printing, it always leaves one behind. Not sure about Acrobat, it may work differently. –  jmc Oct 24 at 5:08

Problem 1

You may be able to work your way around the registry. In HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.pdf\PersistentHandler\(Default) you should find a CLSID that points to a value found in one of two places. Either the CLSID folder of the same key, or (for 64 bit systems) one step down in Wow6432Node\CLSID then in that CLSID's key.

Within that key you can look for LocalServer32 and find the default string value pointing to the current exe path.

I'm not 100% on any of this, but seems plausible (though you're going to have to verify on multiple environments to confirm that in-fact locates the process you're looking for).

(Here are the docs on registry keys involved regarding PersistentHandlers)

Problem 2

Probably using the CreateNoWindow of the Process StartInfo.

Process p = new Process();
p.StartInfo.FileName = @"C:\Program Files (x86)\Adobe\Reader 10.0\Reader\AcroRd32.exe";
p.StartInfo.Arguments = "/t \"Label.pdf\" \"HP4000\" \"HP LaserJet 4100 Series PCL6\" \"out.pdf\"";
p.CreateNoWindow = true;
p.Start();
p.WaitForExit();

(only a guess however, but I'm sure a little testing will prove it to work/not work)

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But, won't the process still be running (e.g. you can see it in TaskManager) even if that does manage to keep it from being shown? –  Chad Feb 1 '11 at 23:14
    
@Chad: I've never had good luck printing PDFs and have googled extensivly for solutions all-over. I wanted to automate an internal task using what you're basically trying to do, but ended up bailing due to lack of documentation, problems with closing the application, or too many variations to look for. You may just be able to get a PDF library that can "internally render" the file and send it to print directly through the application, but most of the libraries that are good for this sort of thing cost money. –  Brad Christie Feb 1 '11 at 23:20
1  
For problem 2 I tried this out and it doesn't work the way I want it to. It basically hangs on the WaitForExit() until I manually close the acrobat window. I tried using the WaitForInputIdle() and then doing a Kill() on the process object but it kills it before the print occurs. The CreateNoWindow seems to have no affect on whether it displays the window or not either. –  Cole W Feb 2 '11 at 13:21
2  
@Cole W, yeah the WaitForInputIdle() trick worked for versions before X, but they "fixed" that. I think they are serious about wanting their window open and staying open until the user closes it. –  ongle Jul 28 '11 at 18:20

If you use Acrobat reader 4.0 you can do things like this: "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 4.0\Reader\Acrord32.exe" /t /s "U:\PDF_MS\SM003067K08.pdf" Planning_H2 BUT if the PDF file has been created in a newer version of Acrobat an invisible window opens

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got another solution .. its combination of other snippets from stackOverflow. When I call CloseMainWindow, and then call Kill .. adobe closes down

    Dim info As New ProcessStartInfo()
    info.Verb = "print"
    info.FileName = Microsoft.Win32.Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey("Software").OpenSubKey("Microsoft").OpenSubKey("Windows").OpenSubKey("CurrentVersion").OpenSubKey("App Paths").OpenSubKey("AcroRd32.exe").GetValue(String.Empty).ToString()
    info.Arguments = String.Format("/p /h {0}", "c:\log\test.pdf")
    info.CreateNoWindow = True
    info.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden
    info.UseShellExecute = False

    Dim p As Process = Process.Start(info)
    p.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden

    Dim counter As Integer = 0
    Do Until p.HasExited
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000)
        counter += 1
        If counter = 5 Then
            Exit Do
        End If
    Loop
    If p.HasExited = False Then
        p.CloseMainWindow()
        p.Kill()
    End If
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