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My OSX app needs to display a list of the user's known wifi networks. I've already figured out how to do this using the CoreWLAN framework. The code I'm using is:

CWInterface *interface = [[CWInterface alloc] init];
NSArray *knownNetworks = interface.configuration.preferredNetworks;

This works fine, except that when I do this, OSX prompts the user saying my app needs keychain access for each network that has a passphrase stored. The "preferredNetworks" property returns an array of CWWirelessProfile objects. One of the properties of this class is "passphrase". I believe this property is why my app needs keychain access.

I don't need, or even want, the passphrases for the user's known networks. All I care about is the SSID. Is there a way to query a list of known SSIDs without also pulling the passphrase? I would prefer it if my app didn't prompt the user that it needs keychain access. Also, the prompt is useless in my case because regardless if the user hits "Allow" or "Deny", I am still able to access the network's SSID.

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1  
I’ve just filed an enhancement request asking for CWWirelessProfile to require keychain access only if actually necessary; I suggest you do the same. I think you’ll have to make do with the System Configuration framework. –  Bavarious Feb 2 '11 at 2:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It turns out that Bavarious was correct; I can utilize the System Configuration framework to retrieve a list of know wifi networks without prompting the user for admin access. Here is the class I ended up creating that handles this:

static NSString *configPath = @"/Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/preferences.plist";

@implementation KnownWifiNetworks

/**
 This method reads the SystemConfiguration file located at configPath. Its schema is described in Apple's
 Documentation at this url:
 http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Networking/Conceptual/SystemConfigFrameworks/SC_Components/SC_Components.html

 TODO: Cache the results so we don't have the read the file every time?
 */
+ (NSArray *)allKnownNetworks {
    NSMutableArray *result = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:50];
    @try {
        NSDictionary *config = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithContentsOfFile:configPath];
        NSDictionary *sets = [config objectForKey:@"Sets"];
        for (NSString *setKey in sets) {
            NSDictionary *set = [sets objectForKey:setKey];
            NSDictionary *network = [set objectForKey:@"Network"];
            NSDictionary *interface = [network objectForKey:@"Interface"];
            for(NSString *interfaceKey in interface) {
                NSDictionary *bsdInterface = [interface objectForKey:interfaceKey];
                for(NSString *namedInterfaceKey in bsdInterface) {
                    NSDictionary *namedInterface = [bsdInterface objectForKey:namedInterfaceKey];
                    NSArray *networks = [namedInterface objectForKey:@"PreferredNetworks"];
                    for (NSDictionary *network in networks) {
                        NSString *ssid = [network objectForKey:@"SSID_STR"];
                        [result addObject:ssid];
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    } @catch (NSException * e) {
        NSLog(@"Failed to read known networks: %@", e);
    }
    return result;
}

@end
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I've been able to use the CoreWLAN framework classes to get a list of known network SSIDs without requiring keychain access like so:

NSMutableArray *result = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:50];
CWInterface *interface = [CWInterface interface];
NSEnumerator *profiles = [interface.configuration.networkProfiles objectEnumerator];
CWNetworkProfile *profile;
while (profile = [profiles nextObject]) {
    [result addObject:profile.ssid];
}
return result;

It seems that CWInterface.configuration.preferredNetworks is deprecated but this solution works quite well.

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