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I just saw this thread, describing how to add conditional macros: Conditional value for a #define

but in my case I am defining a function within the condition.

#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR

#define doSomething(){\
    \\ does something
}\

#else

#define doSomething(){\
    \\ does something else
}\

#endif

This does work, except I is causing gcc compiler to throw this warning:

"doSomething" redefined
This is the location of the previous arguments

Is there any workaround to help getting rid of the warnings?

UPDATE:

So I tried including the condition inside my definition:

#define doSomething(){\

#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
    \\ do something
#else 
    \\ do something else
#endif

}\

but that throws an error:

error: '#' is not followed by a macro parameter.
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I found the answer to my question here.

Conclusion: you cannot include #ifdef etc... inside #define, because there should only be one pre-processing directive per line.

So although we can break the line with a backslash '\' this helps writing readable multiline macros, but the preprocessor will see it as one line:

#define doSomething(){ #if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR ... #endif }

Which throws this error:

error: '#' is not followed by a macro parameter.

That makes sense, so I will have to rethink my implementation.

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One option to consider is creating a condition in a macro that will resolve at compile time. Consider the following:

If I would like to call a different function based on the value of 'c' as a pre-processor action, I can define a macro that checks the value of 'c' statically.

#define AorB(c) ((c>0) ? (Do_A(c)) : (Do_B(c)))

Then if you configure a level of optimization that removes branches that are never reachable, it should strip out which ever case wasn't performed. This may not exactly be what you were looking for.

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Did you try using #ifdef instead of #if

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Yes I have tried #ifdef, same result. Seekna, please post questions as comments under my post instead of answers thx for your help. –  Bach Feb 2 '11 at 6:51
    
With the code below I didnot get any compiler warnings. with or w/o TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR defined <pre><code> #include "string.h" #include "stdio.h" #define TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR 1 int x =1; int y =2; #if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR #define doSomething() {\ printf ("%d \n ",x); \ } #else #define doSomething(){\ printf ("%d \n ",y); \ } #endif main() { doSomething(); } </code></pre> –  seekna Feb 2 '11 at 20:10
    
thanks Seekna, that still didn't work for me. I still get this warning. –  Bach Feb 11 '11 at 5:53
    
I agree that the version of code in the update creates "#" error.But the code in my previous comment using your original version does not encounter any compiler warning. –  seekna Feb 23 '11 at 0:01

There is a quirk in your thinking which is by analogy/ extension. doSomething() has to be viewed as a function-like macro. As such its definition is ambivalent. Zoom out and see below:

doSomething() {
#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
   // conditionally compiled code
#else
   // platform-specific code
#endif
}
share|improve this answer
    
you're forgetting that doSomething is a defined macro. If i have #define doSomething() #if ... this will break the macro and you'll get the error: '#' is not followed by a macro parameter. –  Bach Feb 15 '11 at 23:57

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