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I wrote a method that does some stuff and catches bad filenames. what should happen is if the path doesn't exist, it throws an IOError. however, it thinks my exception handling is bad syntax... why??

def whatever():
    try:
        # do stuff
        # and more stuff
    except IOError:
        # do this
        pass
whatever()

but before it even gets to calling whatever(), it prints the following:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "", line 1, in 
  File "getquizzed.py", line 55
    except IOError:
         ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

when imported...help?!

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I don't see what's WRONG!! –  tekknolagi Feb 2 '11 at 0:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Check your indenting. This unhelpful SyntaxError error has fooled me before. :)

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ohmygosh that was it!! –  tekknolagi Feb 2 '11 at 0:20
    
great now i have another issue...mind helping? it won't catch the IOError... –  tekknolagi Feb 2 '11 at 0:26
    
@tekknalogi: How do you know it won't? What error message are you getting? –  Falmarri Feb 2 '11 at 0:35
    
never mind...fixed it :) –  tekknolagi Feb 2 '11 at 0:43
    
@brian I will always try that in the future - and forgot accepting answers existed for a sec. –  tekknolagi Feb 2 '11 at 5:34

Just missing something in your try block, i.e. pass or anything, otherwise it gives an indentation error.

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got it but a tad late :( –  tekknolagi Feb 2 '11 at 0:22

You will get a syntax error if you don't put something in side the try block. You can put pass just to hold the space:

try:
    # do stuff
    # and more stuff
    pass
except IOError:
    # do this
    pass
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1  
oh there was stuff...see the comment. and why is your syntax highlighted not mine? –  tekknolagi Feb 2 '11 at 0:20

there's 1 more possible if you're privileged to have an older installation

and

you're using the 'as' syntax:

     except IOError as ioe:

and

the parser's getting tripped up on 'as'.

Using as is the preferred syntax in Python 2.6 and better.

It's a syntax error in Python 2.5 and older. For pre-2.6, use this:

     except IOError, ioe:

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Well, I came here searching for this. Thanks. –  Sanju Aug 5 '14 at 10:26

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