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I'm using this script in my current website. I'm able to make it work in Ruby on Rails 3, but I was wondering could it be rewritten in Ruby. If so, where can I find information on it?

function init ( )
{
  timeDisplay = document.createTextNode ( "" );
  document.getElementById("clock").appendChild ( timeDisplay );
}

function updateClock ( )
{
  var currentTime = new Date ( );

  var currentDay = currentTime.getDay ( );

  //Convert the day component to day abbreviation
  currentDay = ( currentDay == 0 ) ? "Sun" : currentDay;
  currentDay = ( currentDay == 1 ) ? "Mon" : currentDay;
  currentDay = ( currentDay == 2 ) ? "Tue" : currentDay;
  currentDay = ( currentDay == 3 ) ? "Wed" : currentDay;
  currentDay = ( currentDay == 4 ) ? "Thu" : currentDay;
  currentDay = ( currentDay == 5 ) ? "Fri" : currentDay;
  currentDay = ( currentDay == 6 ) ? "Sat" : currentDay;

  var currentMonth = currentTime.getMonth( ); 

  //Convert the month component to text month
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 0 ) ? "January" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 1 ) ? "February" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 2 ) ? "March" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 3 ) ? "April" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 4 ) ? "May" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 5 ) ? "June" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 6 ) ? "July" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 7 ) ? "August" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 8 ) ? "September" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 9 ) ? "October" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 10) ? "November" : currentMonth;
  currentMonth = ( currentMonth == 11) ? "December" : currentMonth;

  var currentDate = currentTime.getDate( );

  // Add suffix to the date
  currentDate = ( currentDate == 1 || currentDate == 21 || currentDate == 31 ) ? currentDate + "st" : currentDate;
  currentDate = ( currentDate == 2 || currentDate == 22 ) ? currentDate + "nd" : currentDate;
  currentDate = ( currentDate == 3 ) || currentDate == 23 ? currentDate + "rd" : currentDate;
  currentDate = ( currentDate > 3 || currentDate < 21 || currentDate > 23 || currentDate < 31 ) ? currentDate + "th" : currentDate;


  var currentHours = currentTime.getHours ( );
  var currentMinutes = currentTime.getMinutes ( );

  // Pad the minutes and seconds with leading zeros, if required
  currentMinutes = ( currentMinutes < 10 ? "0" : "" ) + currentMinutes;

  // Choose either "AM" or "PM" as appropriate
  var timeOfDay = ( currentHours < 12 ) ? "AM" : "PM";

  // Convert the hours component to 12-hour format if needed
  currentHours = ( currentHours > 12 ) ? currentHours - 12 : currentHours;

  // Convert an hours component of "0" to "12"
  currentHours = ( currentHours == 0 ) ? 12 : currentHours;

  // Compose the string for display
  var currentTimeString = "Today is : " + currentDay + " " + currentMonth +  " " + currentDate + " " + currentHours + ":" + currentMinutes + " " + timeOfDay;

  // Update the time display
  document.getElementById("clock").firstChild.nodeValue = currentTimeString;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd suggest looking at Ruby's Time class. Specifically, the Time.now() function.

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Time.html

And then look at time.strftime() to determine how to format it the same as in your above code.

Example:

t = Time.now  
puts t.strftime("%d/%m/%Y %H:%M:%S")  
share|improve this answer
1  
Beware Time.now uses the servers local time. You will need to read up on utc_offset if you plan on displaying pages to users in different time zones. – Steve Wilhelm Feb 2 '11 at 0:52
    
that would probably work my question is now will that clock auto update or not? – Rod Nelson Feb 2 '11 at 1:26
    
@Rod Nelson - Please update your original question if you are adding to it or changing it. – the Tin Man Feb 2 '11 at 1:47
    
You can continue to use JavaScript to update the time, but you'd need to change the implementation of it. It won't work as-is. – calvinf Feb 2 '11 at 18:22

Sure you could do it but it's important to note that, as Steve Wilhelm pointed out, you would then be using the server time but most importantly you would be making the server do work that the client can, and should, be doing. It's important to offload as much trivial processing onto the client as possible to have the most efficient server. It may seem like a minor thing but if you have several minor things on every page they can up to a major thing especially when your server starts getting used a lot.

It's like how people that hike the Appalachian trail cut off the handle of their toothbrush. It's only an ounce or two but if you add that ounce to all the other ounces they shed from chopping up their other stuff it can add up to pounds.

share|improve this answer
    
i see where your coming from not sure if what ya mean buy the user doing it mainly what i want to use it for is a running clock and a count down timer till my next gig! I'll figure out how to set the clock to CST myself that's no biggie looks like Time.now() will save me a ton of code witch is good! – Rod Nelson Feb 2 '11 at 1:31
    
Ah, well then what you want to do is have a server side setting of the gig date and time (in a model for gig dates maybe) and pass that along with the gig local time to the client side javascript. Now the client side javascript can count down based on your gig start time relative to where it is in the world, not based on where the browser is, without having to talk to the server every second. – Mike Bethany Feb 2 '11 at 1:35

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