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I'm writing an Android application. As far as I know, most SD cards in devices have ~4Mb/s write speed. In the worst case, my application needs to create and write ~0.5Mb to a new file about 5 times a second. Generally, IO is very fast when doing this but, after creating and writing to several files in a short period of time, I experience a sudden long wait time of ~2 seconds.

Here are some stats from my application (note that only one IO operation is ever running at a time):

E  = Time IO operation began
S  = Number of Mbs written
WT = Time taken to write to file

E      S        WT     
14.546 ~0.41 MB 0.02s
15.061 ~0.40 MB 0.019s
15.600 ~0.42 MB 0.073s
16.054 ~0.41 MB 0.02s
16.538 ~0.36 MB 0.019s
17.007 ~0.33 MB 0.018s
17.475 ~0.32 MB 0.017s
18.030 ~0.38 MB 0.07s
19.991 ~0.38 MB 1.542s <--
20.124 ~0.34 MB 0.018s
20.233 ~0.25 MB 0.015s
20.390 ~0.38 MB 0.021s
20.624 ~0.36 MB 0.08s
20.858 ~0.37 MB 0.018s
21.304 ~0.32 MB 0.018s
21.796 ~0.33 MB 0.017s
22.257 ~0.35 MB 0.02s
22.780 ~0.37 MB 0.07s
24.366 ~0.27 MB 1.178s <--
24.522 ~0.40 MB 0.021s
24.648 ~0.34 MB 0.019s
24.866 ~0.38 MB 0.018s
25.319 ~0.29 MB 0.07s
25.850 ~0.45 MB 0.021s
26.288 ~0.39 MB 0.018s
26.796 ~0.43 MB 0.035s
27.249 ~0.33 MB 0.069s
27.671 ~0.41 MB 0.018s
30.054 ~0.44 MB 1.874s <--

Notice that most of the IO operations finish in <0.05s but, after about 8 write operations where ~4Mb of data has been written in total, the next IO operation takes ~1.5s. Why is this happening? This pattern happens fairly consistently.

My files are being written with the following code (I'm not flushing or syncing):

  RandomAccessFile fos = new RandomAccessFile(filename, "rw");
  FileChannel outChannel = fos.getChannel();
  byteBuffer.rewind();
  outChannel.write(byteBuffer);
  fos.close();

I'm no expert in file IO but I know the fast IO operation times indicate the data hasn't actually been written to disk yet and the big pauses are probably buffers being flushed. How do I avoid the pauses? It seems as if my IO operations are small and infrequent enough that I should be able to avoid this pausing.

For some context: I'm using the command pattern with mementos to implement undo/redo in a context where there are many destructive operations the user can perform. I cannot store the mementos in memory because I don't have enough memory so I write the mementos to disk instead. This works fantastic except for the above pausing problem as it means the UI is forced to wait for the IO to finish and 1.5s of lag is too much to hide from the user. I know there are other was to implement undo/redo but every approach has flaws.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why is this happening?

Welcome to flash.

I'm no expert in file IO but I know the fast IO operation times indicate the data hasn't actually been written to disk yet and the big pauses are probably buffers being flushed.

Probably not. Most Android devices use the YAFFS2 file system, which does not buffer data too much, as I understand it. However, they do have a per-partition write lock, so your pauses are probably when something else is writing to flash.

As more Android devices (e.g., Nexus S) run the ext4 file system, then flushing/syncing becomes important.

Also, bear in mind that flash write speeds will vary by a variety of other factors, such as how full the file system is, the state of wear-leveling on the particular cells being tried, etc.

You may wish to watch Brad Fitzpatrick's 2010 Google I|O presentation on "Writing Zippy Android Apps", as he goes into more details on this.

How do I avoid the pauses?

You don't. You move the flash I/O to a background thread, perhaps via an AsyncTask. The new StrictMode in Android 2.3 will help you identify where you have such "janky" code.

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Argh, that's disappointing. I'd like my undo/redo stack to persist between app sessions so I need to get these stacks saved to disk at some point. Command objects can grow to quite a size as well so I'll need to have a background process writing them to disk as they are created. With unpredictable IO write times though, it's not obvious how I can make sure I get everything written to disk by the time onPause is called if my application is interrupted. The situation is even worse if I need to call .sync() as well on each file. Any advice? –  rbcc Feb 2 '11 at 1:13
    
@rebeccamaher: "Command objects can grow to quite a size as well so I'll need to have a background process writing them to disk as they are created." -- a background thread please. Consider using a LinkedBlockingQueue with a thread receiving mementos on the queue and writing them to flash as they arrive. "it's not obvious how I can make sure I get everything written to disk by the time onPause is called if my application is interrupted." -- your background thread will not be impacted by calls to onPause(). –  CommonsWare Feb 2 '11 at 1:19
    
Oops, I meant thread. Thanks for the references! Aren't there any problems running a thread when another activity comes to the front? Isn't the thread likely to get killed? Thanks for the tips, I can give this idea a try. My only issue is minimising the data to be saved so that, if I cannot save the data to disk fast enough, I won't have to toss too many commands away. –  rbcc Feb 2 '11 at 1:51
    
@rebeccamaher: "Aren't there any problems running a thread when another activity comes to the front? Isn't the thread likely to get killed?" -- the thread won't be, but the process that hosts the thread might get shut down. If you determine that your queue gets backlogged too much, replace the LinkedBlockingQueue and custom Thread with an IntentService, and the odds improve greatly that all commands will get written to flash eventually. –  CommonsWare Feb 2 '11 at 1:55

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