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jQuery 1.5 brings the new Deferred object and the attached methods .when, .Deferred and ._Deferred.

For those who havn't used .Deferred before I've annotated the source for it

What are the possible usages of these new methods, how do we go about fitting them into patterns?

I have already read the API and the source, so I know what it does. My question is how can we use these new features in everyday code?

I have a simple example of a buffer class that calls AJAX request in order. (Next one start after previous one finishes).

/* Class: Buffer
 *  methods: append
 *
 *  Constructor: takes a function which will be the task handler to be called
 *
 *  .append appends a task to the buffer. Buffer will only call a task when the 
 *  previous task has finished
 */
var Buffer = function(handler) {
    var tasks = [];
    // empty resolved deferred object
    var deferred = $.when();

    // handle the next object
    function handleNextTask() {
        // if the current deferred task has resolved and there are more tasks
        if (deferred.isResolved() && tasks.length > 0) {
            // grab a task
            var task = tasks.shift();
            // set the deferred to be deferred returned from the handler
            deferred = handler(task);
            // if its not a deferred object then set it to be an empty deferred object
            if (!(deferred && deferred.promise)) {
                deferred = $.when();
            }
            // if we have tasks left then handle the next one when the current one 
            // is done.
            if (tasks.length > 0) {
                deferred.done(handleNextTask);
            }
        }
    }

    // appends a task.
    this.append = function(task) {
        // add to the array
        tasks.push(task);
        // handle the next task
        handleNextTask();
    };
};

I'm looking for demonstrations and possible uses of .Deferred and .when.

It would also be lovely to see examples of ._Deferred.

Linking to the new jQuery.ajax source for examples is cheating.

Bounty: Show us what techniques are available when we abstract away whether an operation is synchronously or asynchronously done.

share|improve this question
16  
From the FAQ: avoid asking subjective questions where...every answer is equally valid: “What’s your favorite ______?” (their emphasis) –  T.J. Crowder Feb 2 '11 at 0:53
1  
@T.J.Crowser I'll look at rewording it. –  Raynos Feb 2 '11 at 0:57
2  
It's a good question but there can't be that many people who can answer :-) –  Pointy Feb 2 '11 at 1:05
1  
@Pointy I mainly looking at those who used it when it was a 3rd party plugin. And encouraging people to sit down and use it! –  Raynos Feb 2 '11 at 1:07
1  
._Deferred is simply the true "Deferred object" which .Deferred uses. It's an internal object which you'll most likely never need. –  Box9 Feb 2 '11 at 10:05

10 Answers 10

up vote 164 down vote accepted

The best use case I can think of is in caching AJAX responses. Here's a modified example from Rebecca Murphey's intro post on the topic:

var cache = {};

function getData( val ){

    // return either the cached value or an
    // jqXHR object (which contains a promise)
    return cache[ val ] || $.ajax('/foo/', {
        data: { value: val },
        dataType: 'json',
        success: function( resp ){
            cache[ val ] = resp;
        }
    });
}

getData('foo').then(function(resp){
    // do something with the response, which may
    // or may not have been retreived using an
    // XHR request.
});

Basically, if the value has already been requested once before it's returned immediately from the cache. Otherwise, an AJAX request fetches the data and adds it to the cache. The $.when/.then doesn't care about any of this; all you need to be concerned about is using the response, which is passed to the .then() handler in both cases.

Deferreds are perfect for when the task may or may not operate asynchronously, and you want to abstract that condition out of the code.

Another real world example using the $.when helper:

$.when($.getJSON('/some/data/'), $.get('template.tpl')).then(function (data, tmpl) {

    $(tmpl) // create a jQuery object out of the template
    .tmpl(data) // compile it
    .appendTo("#target"); // insert it into the DOM

});
share|improve this answer
    
It's defiantly good to to use $.when().then to abstract away whether the data is asynchronously or synchronolously handled. The buffer does a similar thing except it abstracts away whether a task is handled sychronously or asynchronously. –  Raynos Feb 2 '11 at 14:30
3  
Two brilliants examples. I implemented something similar to the 2nd one, but with 4 ajax requests, and it performs well, in addition to be far more legible, compact, logic, maintainable, etc. jQuery.Deferred is a real good thing. –  PJP Apr 1 '11 at 9:55
4  
Here is a useful video on this topic bigbinary.com/videos/3-using-deferred-in-jquery –  Nick Vanderbilt Jul 24 '11 at 6:08
4  
Caching will not work if the result is falsy value. Also I don't like the fact getData returns 2 different types depending on the branch taken. –  Marko Dumic Mar 27 '12 at 15:41
2  
See Julian D.'s answer below for a better implementation of ajax caching. –  event_jr Apr 17 '12 at 23:45

Here is a slightly different implementation of an AJAX cache as in ehynd's answer.

As noted in fortuneRice's follow-up question, ehynd's implementation didn't actually prevent multiple identical requests if the requests were performed before one of them had returned. That is,

for (var i=0; i<3; i++) {
    getData("xxx");
}

will most likely result in 3 AJAX requests if the result for "xxx" has not already been cached before.

This can be solved by caching the request's Deferreds instead of the result:

var cache = {};

function getData( val ){

    // Return a promise from the cache (if available)
    // or create a new one (a jqXHR object) and store it in the cache.
    var promise = cache[val];
    if (!promise) {
        promise = $.ajax('/foo/', {
            data: { value: val },
            dataType: 'json'
        });
        cache[val] = promise;
    }
    return promise;
}

$.when(getData('foo')).then(function(resp){
    // do something with the response, which may
    // or may not have been retreived using an
    // XHR request.
});
share|improve this answer
2  
This is one sweet, sweet answer and exactly the insight I was looking for. Nicely done. –  Remi Despres-Smyth Mar 19 '13 at 19:20
    
I think this is still not perfect, since you never clear / update the cache once the first time fetched. This will make AJAX call not working for any update. –  zyzyis Apr 11 at 7:47
    
But Ajax requests are already cached by default in the browser... –  vsync Jun 17 at 10:49

A deferred can be used in place of a mutex. This is essentially the same as the multiple ajax usage scenarios.

MUTEX

var mutex = 2;

setTimeout(function() {
 callback();
}, 800);

setTimeout(function() {
 callback();
}, 500);

function callback() {
 if (--mutex === 0) {
  //run code
 }
}

DEFERRED

function timeout(x) {
 var dfd = jQuery.Deferred();
 setTimeout(function() {
  dfd.resolve();
 }, x);
 return dfd.promise();
}

jQuery.when(
timeout(800), timeout(500)).done(function() {
 // run code
});

When using a Deferred as a mutex only, watch out for performance impacts (http://jsperf.com/deferred-vs-mutex/2). Though the convenience, as well as additional benefits supplied by a Deferred is well worth it, and in actual (user driven event based) usage the performance impact should not be noticeable.

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Another use that I've been putting to good purpose is fetching data from multiple sources. In the example below, I'm fetching multiple, independent JSON schema objects used in an existing application for validation between a client and a REST server. In this case, I don't want the browser-side application to start loading data before it has all the schemas loaded. $.when.apply().then() is perfect for this. Thank to Raynos for pointers on using then(fn1, fn2) to monitor for error conditions.

fetch_sources = function (schema_urls) {
    var fetch_one = function (url) {
            return $.ajax({
                url: url,
                data: {},
                contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                dataType: "json",
            });
        }
    return $.map(schema_urls, fetch_one);
}

var promises = fetch_sources(data['schemas']);
$.when.apply(null, promises).then(

function () {
    var schemas = $.map(arguments, function (a) {
        return a[0]
    });
    start_application(schemas);
}, function () {
    console.log("FAIL", this, arguments);
});     
share|improve this answer

This is a self-promotional answer, but I spent a few months researching this and presented the results at jQuery Conference San Francisco 2012.

Here is a free video of the talk:

http://www.confreaks.com/videos/993-jqcon2012-i-promise-to-show-you-when-to-use-deferreds

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4  
Nice presentation. Very helpful, thanks. –  dhochee Dec 22 '12 at 5:13

Another example using Deferreds to implement a cache for any kind of computation (typically some performance-intensive or long-running tasks):

var ResultsCache = function(computationFunction, cacheKeyGenerator) {
    this._cache = {};
    this._computationFunction = computationFunction;
    if (cacheKeyGenerator)
        this._cacheKeyGenerator = cacheKeyGenerator;
};

ResultsCache.prototype.compute = function() {
    // try to retrieve computation from cache
    var cacheKey = this._cacheKeyGenerator.apply(this, arguments);
    var promise = this._cache[cacheKey];

    // if not yet cached: start computation and store promise in cache 
    if (!promise) {
        var deferred = $.Deferred();
        promise = deferred.promise();
        this._cache[cacheKey] = promise;

        // perform the computation
        var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
        args.push(deferred.resolve);
        this._computationFunction.apply(null, args);
    }

    return promise;
};

// Default cache key generator (works with Booleans, Strings, Numbers and Dates)
// You will need to create your own key generator if you work with Arrays etc.
ResultsCache.prototype._cacheKeyGenerator = function(args) {
    return Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments).join("|");
};

Here is an example of using this class to perform some (simulated heavy) calculation:

// The addingMachine will add two numbers
var addingMachine = new ResultsCache(function(a, b, resultHandler) {
    console.log("Performing computation: adding " + a + " and " + b);
    // simulate rather long calculation time by using a 1s timeout
    setTimeout(function() {
        var result = a + b;
        resultHandler(result);
    }, 1000);
});

addingMachine.compute(2, 4).then(function(result) {
    console.log("result: " + result);
});

addingMachine.compute(1, 1).then(function(result) {
    console.log("result: " + result);
});

// cached result will be used
addingMachine.compute(2, 4).then(function(result) {
    console.log("result: " + result);
});

The same underlying cache could be used to cache Ajax requests:

var ajaxCache = new ResultsCache(function(id, resultHandler) {
    console.log("Performing Ajax request for id '" + id + "'");
    $.getJSON('http://jsfiddle.net/echo/jsonp/?callback=?', {value: id}, function(data) {
        resultHandler(data.value);
    });
});

ajaxCache.compute("anID").then(function(result) {
    console.log("result: " + result);
});

ajaxCache.compute("anotherID").then(function(result) {
    console.log("result: " + result);
});

// cached result will be used
ajaxCache.compute("anID").then(function(result) {
    console.log("result: " + result);
});

You can play with the above code in this jsFiddle.

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1) Use it to ensure an ordered execution of callbacks:

var step1 = new Deferred();
var step2 = new Deferred().done(function() { return step1 });
var step3 = new Deferred().done(function() { return step2 });

step1.done(function() { alert("Step 1") });
step2.done(function() { alert("Step 2") });
step3.done(function() { alert("All done") });
//now the 3 alerts will also be fired in order of 1,2,3
//no matter which Deferred gets resolved first.

step2.resolve();
step3.resolve();
step1.resolve();

2) Use it to verify the status of the app:

var loggedIn = logUserInNow(); //deferred
var databaseReady = openDatabaseNow(); //deferred

jQuery.when(loggedIn, databaseReady).then(function() {
  //do something
});
share|improve this answer

You can also integrate it with any 3rd-party libraries which makes use of JQuery.

One such library is Backbone, which is actually going to support Deferred in their next version. I have talked about it also on my blog

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2  
Use read more here in place of on my blog. Its a better practice and can save you answer from (accidently) being spammed. :) –  Lokesh Mehra Nov 22 '12 at 5:34

You can use a deferred object to make a fluid design that works well in webkit browsers. Webkit browsers will fire resize event for each pixel the window is resized, unlike FF and IE which fire the event only once for each resize. As a result, you have no control over the order in which the functions bound to your window resize event will execute. Something like this solves the problem:

var resizeQueue = new $.Deferred(); //new is optional but it sure is descriptive
resizeQueue.resolve();

function resizeAlgorithm() {
//some resize code here
}

$(window).resize(function() {
    resizeQueue.done(resizeAlgorithm);
});

This will serialize the execution of your code so that it executes as you intended it to. Beware of pitfalls when passing object methods as callbacks to a deferred. Once such method is executed as a callback to deferred, the 'this' reference will be overwritten with reference to the deferred object and will no longer refer to the object the method belongs to.

share|improve this answer
    
How does this do any serialization? You've already resolved the queue so resizeQueue.done(resizeAlgorithm) is the exact same as resizeAlgorithm. It's a complete sham! –  Raynos Mar 1 '11 at 13:24
    
When the code of your resizeAlgorithm is complex, JavaScript implementation in webkit will loose synchronization when the function is called for each pixel you resize the window. Deferred keeps your callbacks in a queue and executes them in a FIFO order. So, if you add a 'done' callback and it executes immediately because the deferred is already resolved, another 'done' callback that is added to the deferred while the first callback is still executing will be added to the queue and will have to wait for the first callback to return. I hope this answers your question. –  Miloš Rašić Mar 2 '11 at 12:12
    
the JS interpreter in the browser is single threaded. Unless your resizeAlgorithm has some async code inside it the entire function should have finished operating before the next call to .done is made. –  Raynos Mar 3 '11 at 23:15
    
@Raynos: I'm aware of that, but I tried to simply call the resizeAlgorithm on resize and it gives a blank white page in webkit browsers while working perfectly in others. The deferred solves this problem. I haven't had enough time to do some deeper research into this. Might be a webkit bug. I don't think the deferred as used in my example would help if resizeAlgorithm had some asynchronous code. –  Miloš Rašić Mar 4 '11 at 15:58
2  
Shouldn't you be using something like the throttle/debounce plugin benalman.com/projects/jquery-throttle-debounce-plugin to prevent your functions firing more tahn once per resize. –  wheresrhys Apr 13 '11 at 8:34

I've just used Deferred in real code. In project jQuery Terminal I have function exec that call commands defined by user (like he was entering it and pressing enter), I've added Deferreds to the API and call exec with arrays. like this:

terminal.exec('command').then(function() {
   terminal.echo('command finished');
});

or

terminal.exec(['command 1', 'command 2', 'command 3']).then(function() {
   terminal.echo('all commands finished');
});

the commands can run async code, and exec need to call user code in order. My first api use pair of pause/resume calls and in new API I call those automatic when user return promise. So user code can just use

return $.get('/some/url');

or

var d = new $.Deferred();
setTimeout(function() {
    d.resolve("Hello Deferred"); // resolve value will be echoed
}, 500);
return d.promise();

I use code like this:

exec: function(command, silent, deferred) {
    var d;
    if ($.isArray(command)) {
        return $.when.apply($, $.map(command, function(command) {
            return self.exec(command, silent);
        }));
    }
    // both commands executed here (resume will call Term::exec)
    if (paused) {
        // delay command multiple time
        d = deferred || new $.Deferred();
        dalyed_commands.push([command, silent, d]);
        return d.promise();
    } else {
        // commands may return promise from user code
        // it will resolve exec promise when user promise
        // is resolved
        var ret = commands(command, silent, true, deferred);
        if (!ret) {
            if (deferred) {
                deferred.resolve(self);
                return deferred.promise();
            } else {
                d = new $.Deferred();
                ret = d.promise();
                ret.resolve();
            }
        }
        return ret;
    }
},

dalyed_commands is used in resume function that call exec again with all dalyed_commands.

and part of the commands function (I've stripped not related parts)

function commands(command, silent, exec, deferred) {

    var position = lines.length-1;
    // Call user interpreter function
    var result = interpreter.interpreter(command, self);
    // user code can return a promise
    if (result != undefined) {
        // new API - auto pause/resume when using promises
        self.pause();
        return $.when(result).then(function(result) {
            // don't echo result if user echo something
            if (result && position === lines.length-1) {
                display_object(result);
            }
            // resolve promise from exec. This will fire
            // code if used terminal::exec('command').then
            if (deferred) {
                deferred.resolve();
            }
            self.resume();
        });
    }
    // this is old API
    // if command call pause - wait until resume
    if (paused) {
        self.bind('resume.command', function() {
            // exec with resume/pause in user code
            if (deferred) {
                deferred.resolve();
            }
            self.unbind('resume.command');
        });
    } else {
        // this should not happen
        if (deferred) {
            deferred.resolve();
        }
    }
}
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