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I am getting started with the following simple messagebox application. The problem is that when I run this application the text is Chinese. I clearly have an encoding issue. Can someone point me to somewhere I can learn about windows.h specific string typedefs?

//test.c

#include <windows.h>

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, 
    LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
    MessageBox(NULL, "Hello World", "Note", MB_OK);
    return 0;
}
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If you've got UNICODE defined, as your comment to Laserallan's answer suggests, this shouldn't ever have compiled. You should have gotten an error related to conversion of const char* to const wchar_t*. –  Ben Voigt Feb 2 '11 at 3:13
    
My guess is that it may be a .c file rather than a .cpp file and the c compiler is somewhat more liberal when it comes to type error. –  Laserallan Feb 2 '11 at 3:15
    
Sorry I should have mentioned that. This is a .c file –  Nick Feb 2 '11 at 3:27
    
Write a L in front of your constant strings e.g. L"Hello World" –  CyberSpock Feb 2 '11 at 3:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's most likely a wide char vs ordinary char issue. Try changing the code to:

#include <windows.h>

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, 
    LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
    MessageBox(NULL, L"Hello World", L"Note", MB_OK);
    return 0;
}

If this solves your problem it means your project is configured for wide characters rather than ordinary chars. Adding an L in front of a string constant will make it a wide char constant. This is generally a good thing since it's way easier to manage internationalization for a wide char application.

These web pages covers the Windows API and unicode in more detail:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff381407(v=vs.85).aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd374089(v=vs.85).aspx

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Thanks that does fix the problem. –  Nick Feb 2 '11 at 3:04
2  
This still isn't exactly right, an application built for UNICODE=1 should use wWinMain. –  Ben Voigt Feb 2 '11 at 3:11

When using the windows API (almost) every declaration with null-terminated strings uses TCHAR ,LPTSTR and LPCTSTR which are define as char ,char* and const char* when you're not building with UNICODE as character-set and are defined as wchar_t ,wchar_t* and const wchar_t* when you are building with the UNICODE character-set.

Also the UNICODE and/or _UNICODE definition(s) controll which function is being compiled when you call an windows-API function. Almost every function has two versions ,one for UNICODE and one for non-UNICODE.

for instance MessageBox is either translated to MessageBoxA (non-UNOCODE version) or MessageBoxW (UNOCDE-version).

Further more :

int WINAPI WinMain ( HINSTANCE hInstance ,HINSTANCE hPrevInstance ,LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow ) 
{
// ...
}

is often defined as :

int WINAPI _tWinMain ( HINSTANCE hInstance ,HINSTANCE hPrevInstance ,LPTSTR lpCmdLine ,int nCmdShow ) 
{
// ...
}

for the last version you need to include <tchar.h> which has the right translation for _tWinMain (or _tmain when building consle-app).

Hope this clarefies things for you.

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Looks like VS sets this project to build with character types set to Unicode by default. Should I leave this and just prefix my string literals with L? –  Nick Feb 2 '11 at 3:32
    
You can use the _T( ... ) macro that puts the L there for you when building for UNICODE. Whether one should use UNICODE is another question ,which i can't answer for sure (I use it but don't really know why. –  Edwin Feb 2 '11 at 3:36
    
@Nick, if you know for certain that you'll never need to compile for multibyte characters, then using L and the W versions of the API functions is perfectly acceptable. –  Mark Ransom Feb 2 '11 at 3:41
    
As long as you are certain on that side it's fine with me. People certain not to use multibyte characters tend to be –  Laserallan Feb 2 '11 at 17:05
#include <windows.h>

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, 
    LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
{
    MessageBox(NULL, _T("Hello World"), _T("Note"), MB_OK);
    return 0;
}

The issue is most likely that you are building a UNICODE application and are passing pointers to char strings when the API wants pointers to wchar_t strings

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1  
This still isn't quite right, source code meant to compile for either MBCS or Unicode should use _tWinMain. –  Ben Voigt Feb 2 '11 at 3:12
    
True. I used the _T() macro instead of L"" because he'd be far more likely to encounter _T than L in Microsoft generated code. –  Jeff Paquette Feb 2 '11 at 3:52

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