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(This is not a CS class homework, even if it looks like one)

I'm using bitfields to represent ranges between 0 and 22. As an input, I have several different ranges, for example (order doesn't matter). I used . for 0 and X for 1 for better readability.

.....XXXXX..............
..XXXX..................
.....XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX....
........XXXXXXX.........
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

The number of bitfield ranges is typically below 10, but can potentially become as high as 100. From that input, I want to calculate the mutually exclusive, contiguous ranges, like this:

XX......................
..XXX...................
.....X..................
......XX................
........XX..............
..........XXXXX.........
...............XXXXX....
....................XXXX

(again, the output order doesn't matter, they just need to be mutually exclusive and contiguous, i.e. they can't have holes in them. .....XXX.......XXXXX.... must be split up in two individual ranges).

I tried a couple of algorithms, but all of them ended up being rather complex and unelegant. What would help me immensely is a way to detect that .....XXX.......XXXXX.... has a hole and a way to determine the index of one of the bits in the hole.

Edit: The bitfield range represent zoomlevels on a map. They are intended to be used for outputting XML stylesheets for Mapnik (the tile rendering system that is, among others, used by OpenStreetMap).

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Can you be a bit more specific about how you're trying to partition the bits into ranges? I'd love to help, but I don't quite follow how you came up with the ranges in your example. –  templatetypedef Feb 2 '11 at 5:04
    
I'll up vote the question because you sparked my curiosity. Are you inclined to share what this is use for? –  xelco52 Feb 2 '11 at 5:06
    
The way I came to the desired solution is approximately as follows: Take a vertical column and compare it with the next one, if it's the same in all rows, it's still within the previous columns range. If at least one item differs, a new range begins. The problem is that the input could potentially have 100 or so rows. –  kkaefer Feb 2 '11 at 5:12
    
Agree with xelco52, the problem sounds interesting to me, but I could not get it fully. I see the first block with 5 bitfields (the 5th has all 1's) each of width 22. How does the 'mutually exclusive, contiguous ranges" transformation happen to arrive at the second block of 8 bitfields each of width 22? –  Arun Feb 2 '11 at 14:47
    
CAM application? –  Jamie Sep 20 '12 at 16:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm assuming the solution you're mentioning in the comment is something like this:

Start at the left or right (so index = 0), and scan which bits are set (upto 100 operations). Name that set x. Also set a variable block=0.

At index=1, repeat and store to set y. If x XOR y = 0, both are identical sets, so move on to index=2. If it x XOR y = z != 0, then range [block, index) is contiguous. Now set x = y, block = index, and continue.

If you have 100 bit-arrays of length 22 each, this takes something on the order of 2200 operations.

This is an optimum solution because the operation cannot be reduced further -- at each stage, your range is broken if another set doesn't match your set, so to check if the range is broken you must check all 100 bits.

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I'll take a shot at your sub-problem, at least..

What would help me immensely is a way to detect that .....XXX.......XXXXX.... has a hole and a way to determine the index of one of the bits in the hole.

Finding the lowest and highest set ("1") bits in a bitmask is a pretty solved problem; See, for example, ffs(3) in glibc, or see e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit_array#Find_first_one

Given the first and last indexes of a bitmap, call them i, and j, you can compute the bitmap that has all bits betweem i and j set using M = ((1 << i) - 1) & (~((1 << j) - 1)) (apologies for any off-by-one-errors).

You can then test if the original bitmap has a hole by comparing it to M. If it doesn't match, you can take the input xor M to find the holes and repeat.

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