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I am trying to implement a simple algorithm in java for finding all prime number factors of an integer passed by parameter:

private static ArrayList<Integer> lstPrime= new ArrayList<Integer>();

    public static ArrayList primeFactors(int n) {

        if (isPrime(n)) 
        {
            lstPrime.add(n);
        }

        for (int i=2; i<=(Math.sqrt(n)); i++)
        {
            if (n % i == 0)
            {
                lstPrime.addAll(primeFactors(n/i));
                return lstPrime;
            }
        }
        return lstPrime;
    }

Funny thing is that if I pass 81 as n, the result will be : 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3 while it SHOULD be : 3, 3, 3, 3 (3^4=81)

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1  
FWIW, from a design perspective, it would be better to write this as a purely functional algorithm - that is, don't modify some (basically a global) array. Instead, the base case would return a new 1-element array... recursive step is an exercise for the reader, as the textbooks say ;-) –  Matt Ball Feb 2 '11 at 5:40
    
if a value n can have more than one combination of prime factors (theoretically possible), how is your (current) algorithm supposed to return this? Or do you simply want the first "best" prime factors combination? –  Yanick Rochon Feb 2 '11 at 5:47
    
@Matt, would you mean something like this: public static int[] primeFactors(int n) {...} –  JFB Feb 2 '11 at 5:48
    
@Yanick, yes I wish to have combination of different prime factors ... my current algorithm does not support this... –  JFB Feb 2 '11 at 5:52
2  
@Yanick: It's very easy to prove that it's not possible to have more than one prime factorization :) Suppose if N= p1 * p2 and N = p3*p4 where Pk are prime numbers. It is, easy to realize that if p1<p2 and p3>p1, then its the case that p4<p2. We would need to multiply p1 by a factor X and divide p2 by the same factor to get p3 and p4. Since we are multiplying p1 by a number, it will no longer be a prime number. This concept can be readily extended to more than two prime factors. –  Shamim Hafiz Feb 2 '11 at 6:21
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7 Answers

Perhaps a little more complex, but it works so far, and it uses probably the fastest (and smallest) prime number generator I could find in Java.

First, we got the prime number generator, needed to test if a value is prime. We use a generator (this one is 10x faster than the naïve method) so we use a cached list :

/**
 * Sieve of Sundaram prime number generator
 * Implementation following the Sieve of Sundaram to generate prime numbers 
 * 
 * @see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Sundaram
 */
static public class SundaramSievePrimeGenerator {
   public String getName() { return "Sieve of Sundaram generator"; }
   public int[] findPrimes(int max) {
      int n = max/2;
      boolean[] isPrime = new boolean[max];

      Arrays.fill(isPrime, true);

      for (int i=1; i<n; i++) {
         for (int j=i; j<=(n-i)/(2*i+1); j++) {
            isPrime[i+j+2*i*j] = false;
         }
      }

      int[] primes = new int[max];
      int found = 0;
      if (max > 2) {
         primes[found++] = 2;
      }
      for (int i=1; i<n; i++) {
         if (isPrime[i]) {
            primes[found++] = i*2+1;
         }
      }

      return Arrays.copyOf(primes, found);
   }
}

Then we have the two methods needed to actually get the list of prime factor for n :

/**
 * Reuse an instance of the SundaramSievePrimeGenerator
 */
static public List<Integer> findPrimeFactors(int n, SundaramSievePrimeGenerator g) {
   ArrayList<Integer> primeFactors = new ArrayList<Integer>();

   int[] primes = g.findPrimes(n+1);
   int v;

   // debug
   //System.out.print("** primes found : ");
   //for (int a : primes) {
   //   System.out.print(" " + a);
   //}
   //System.out.println();

   if (primes[primes.length-1] == n) {
      primeFactors.add(n);
   } else {

      int max = primes.length - 1;

      for (int i=max; i>=0; i--) {
         primeFactors.add(primes[i]);
         if (testPrimeFactor(n, primes[i], primes, i, primeFactors)) {
            break;  // we found our solution
         }
         primeFactors.clear();
      }
   }

   return primeFactors;
}

/**
 * Recursive method initially called by findPrimeFactors(n, g)
 */
static private boolean testPrimeFactor(int n, int v, int[] primes, int index, List<Integer> factors) {
   int v2 = v * primes[index];

   if (v2 == n) {
      factors.add(primes[index]);
      return true;
   } else if (v2 > n) {
      if (index > 0) {
         return testPrimeFactor(n, v, primes, index-1, factors);
      } else {
         return false;
      }
   } else {
      while (index > 0) {
         factors.add(primes[index]);

         if (testPrimeFactor(n, v2, primes, index, factors)) {
            return true;
         }

         factors.remove(factors.size()-1);   // no good, remove added prime
         v2 = v * primes[--index];
      }
      return false;   // at this point, we are still below n... so no good
   }
}

And finally, our test case :

int n = 1025;
SundaramSievePrimeGenerator generator = new SundaramSievePrimeGenerator();

List<Integer> factors = findPrimeFactors(n, generator);

if (factors.isEmpty()) {
   System.out.println("No prime factors found for " + n);
} else {
   System.out.println(n + " is composed of " + factors.size() + " prime factors");
   int v = 1;
   for (int i : factors) {
      v *= i;
      System.out.print(" " + i);
   }
   System.out.println(" = " + v);
}

For example, this code above will produce :

1025 is composed of 3 prime factors
 41 5 5 = 1025

And changing n = 81 will produce the desired output of

81 is composed of 4 prime factors
 3 3 3 3 = 81
share|improve this answer
    
This is very cool, but it seems like a bit of a lengthy implementation. I already have the isPrime() done so we don't have to worry about that. Well, at least it works... –  JFB Feb 2 '11 at 15:19
    
meh. I won't budge on this one, I believe this implementation is better in the long run :) –  Yanick Rochon Feb 2 '11 at 19:46
add comment

the problem is your recursive implementation. use this:

public static ArrayList primeFactors(int n){
    if (isPrime(n))
    {
        list.add(n);
        return list;
    }
    int i = 1;
    while(true){
        if (n % (i+=2) == 0){
            if (isPrime(i))
            {
                n = n / i;
                list.add(i);
                i = 1;
            }
        }
        if (i> Math.sqrt(n))
            break;
    }
    list.add(n);
    return list;
}
share|improve this answer
    
you can elminate even number while doing n%++i to n%i+=2 –  Dead Programmer Feb 2 '11 at 7:40
    
yes you are right. I'm sure I can improve this further, it's been a while since I toyed with primes. –  jakev Feb 2 '11 at 7:47
    
I like this answer except that is is not recursive... You didn't declare your list in the method? –  JFB Feb 2 '11 at 15:15
    
right, the list is declared in the class. sorry, didn't realize it was required to be recursive. –  jakev Feb 2 '11 at 17:34
add comment
public static void primeFactorsOf( int n ) 
{
    int i;

    if( isPrime( n ) )
        System.out.println( n +". " );
    else
    {
        for( i = 2; i < n; i ++ )
        {
            if( isPrime( i ) && n % i == 0 )
            {
                System.out.print( i +", " );
                n = n/i;
                primeFactorsOf( n );
            }
        }
    }
}

public static boolean isPrime( int n )
{
    int i;

    if( n < 2 )
        return false;
    else
    {
        for( i = 2; i < n; i += 1 )
        {
            if( n % i == 0 ) 
                return false;
        }
    }    

    return true;
}
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK! I think I have solved my problem, except for the fact that the ArrayList is declared outside the recursive function. I cannot imagine any other way of treating the list because since this is a recursive function, if the list would be declared inside the function, it would be instantiated again and again each time recursion occurs. Here is what I have so far, feel free to criticize:

public static ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();

public static void primeFactors(int n) {
    if (isPrime(n)) 
    {
        list.add(n);
        return;
    }

    int i = 2;
    while (i < n/2)
    {
        if (n % i == 0)
        {
             if (isPrime(i))
             {
                 primeFactors(n/i);
                 list.add(i);
                 return;
             } 
        }
        i++;
    }
    return;
}

For example, this code will produce: 3,3,3,3 for primeFactors(81) and 5,3,2,2 for primeFactors(60) and so on...

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add comment
public static void primeFactorsOf( int n )
    {
        int i = 2;
        boolean isFactor = false;

        if( isPrime( n ) )
            System.out.println( n+"." );
        else 
        {
            while( !isFactor )
            {
                if( ( n % i == 0 ) && ( isPrime( i ) ) )
                {
                    System.out.print( i +", " );
                    primeFactorsOf( n / i );
                    isFactor = true;
                }
                else
                    i ++;
            }
        }
    }
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My Java is rusty so you'll have to add arrays/lists/vectors yourself, but this seems simpler than all the other solutions so far.

public static void primeFactors(int n) 
{
  for (int i = 2; i < n; i++)
    if (n % i == 0)
    {
      primeFactors(n / i);
      primeFactors(i);
    }

  System.out.println(n);
}
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Edit: There is a design flaw. Why do you have to return the list. It's defined outside the function body and would get updated for each factor found. Therefore, no need to return it.

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you need to return an Arraylist, and if n is prime, the loop won't do anything, so it will return anyway –  jakev Feb 2 '11 at 5:55
    
it's a recursive implementation, so by its own definition it needs to return a list. you are correct that the list is kept outside the body, which is a problem. the design is flawed. see my answer. also - you should respond to my comment in the comments section, not by editing your answer. –  jakev Feb 2 '11 at 6:04
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