Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Two arrays are to be interchanged with their values, I am seeking methods to do it without using third array. How could it be solved? I saw some arithmetic methods (as shown below) to do it for integers, but couldn't sort out my problem with string arrays.

int a[350]={350 values};
int b[350]={350 values};
for(int i=0;i<350;i++)
{
    a[i]=a[i]+b[i];
    b[i]=a[i]-b[i];    
    a[i]=a[i]-b[i];
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you give an example of one of your "problem strings"? –  Justin Morgan Feb 2 '11 at 5:39
1  
I already fixed your question here, but for future reference, note that you can format code on Stack Overflow by simply indenting it with 4 spaces. –  Cody Gray Feb 2 '11 at 5:39
    
What's wrong with the above code? It uses O(1) memory, which is about as good as you're going to get. –  templatetypedef Feb 2 '11 at 5:39
    
are you assuming all entries in the array are integer values? –  Yasky Feb 2 '11 at 5:39
    
Are you asking for a better way to do it than you've shown, or do you want to know how to do the same thing but with string variables instead of integers? –  Cody Gray Feb 2 '11 at 5:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you're going to iterate over the array, you don't need a new array; just one temporary variable will suffice, and you can reuse it each iteration.

If any new memory allocation is forbidden, then you could use the arithmetic or XOR solution, as long as the data type is integral.

for(int i = 0; i < 350; ++i)
{
    a[i] = a[i] + b[i];
    b[i] = a[i] - b[i];    
    a[i] = a[i] - b[i];
}
// or
for(int i = 0; i < 350; ++i)
{
    a[i] ^= b[i];
    b[i] ^= a[i];
    a[i] ^= b[i];
}

Finally, you can always just swap the array pointers!

object[] a;
object[] b;
object[] temp;

temp = a;
a = b;
b = temp;
share|improve this answer
    
i got that.thanks for your precise answer. –  asteriskbimal Feb 2 '11 at 6:26

Why use any ridiculous tricks? Can't you spare a single int temporary?

for(int i=0;i<350;i++)
{
    std::swap(a[i], b[i]);
}

or

std::swap_ranges(a, a+350, b);

Note: on my machine, the XOR trick typically takes twice as long as just using a single temporary variable for the swap.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for a note of sanity! –  Matthieu M. Feb 2 '11 at 16:29

IF the arrays are integral, you can uses the xor trick:

for(int i = 0; i < 350; ++i) {
    a[i] = a[i] ^ b[i];
    b[i] = a[i] ^ b[i];
    a[i] = a[i] ^ b[i];
}

no temporaries needed

share|improve this answer
    
To show the two-variable case: A1 = A xor B, B1 = A1 xor B = (A xor B xor B) = A, A2 = A1 xor B1 = A xor B xor A = B. –  Foo Bah Feb 2 '11 at 5:40
    
Won't using ++i cause a[0] to be skipped, then overflow at a[350]? –  Justin Morgan Feb 2 '11 at 5:44
1  
no, the end clause is only run at the end of each loop, so i++ and ++i yield the same results. ++i is just habitually preferred (i++ will create a temporary variable to hold a result, whereas ++i does not need the temporary) –  Foo Bah Feb 2 '11 at 5:47
    
compilers are very good at optimizing out temporaries, so any recent C or C++ compiler will just treat both ++i and i++ as a simple increment... as long as i is a built-in of course. –  Matthieu M. Feb 2 '11 at 16:30
    
@Matthiew M. It's easier to be consistent :) Also i find it really strange that K&R decided to write i++ instead of ++i everywhere –  Foo Bah Feb 2 '11 at 16:38

In C++ you can use bit xor for with pointers (I assume that strings are char* or wchar_t*). But really I don't think that one variable is bad for you and it will be better just to use std::swap.

share|improve this answer

Even better:

for(int i = 0; i < 350; ++i)
{
    a[i] ^= b[i];
    b[i] ^= a[i];
    a[i] ^= b[i];
}
share|improve this answer

I guess the author's question is swap the array not using a third array. So I think just use one variable is enough.

int tmp = 0;
for( int i = 0; i < 350; ++i )
{
    tmp = a[i];
    a[i] = b[i];
    b[i] = a[i];
}

why bother use some xor operations?

share|improve this answer
2  
I think your last line should be b[i] = tmp; –  Blastfurnace Feb 2 '11 at 5:47
    
because the question is "How can I interchange the values of two arrays while preserving memory as much as possible?" :) –  Foo Bah Feb 2 '11 at 5:48

Your solution does not work: it illustrates a simple problem actually, that many have stumbled upon.

Algorithms' descriptions do not, in general, take into account the finite memory representation that computers have.

In particular here, int can only hold so many bits, and thus the addition may result in an overflow, which is undefined behavior (on x86, it wraps around, but on other processors it might trigger a hardware exception).

There are two correct (and simple) solutions to exchange two int:

  • int tmp = lhs; lhs = rhs; rhs = tmp;, also known as swap
  • lhs ^= rhs; rhs ^= lhs; lhs ^= rhs;, also known as the XOR trick

Both are obviously applicable in case of arrays.

Another solution, more efficient, would be to swap the arrays themselves.

std::swap(a,b);

Note: if the arrays are statically allocated, it's not possible to swap them directly, but you can perfectly only use pointers to the statically allocated arrays and thus swap the pointers

Caveat: objects that already have a reference to the arrays will not be notified of the swap, in this case you have no other choice than swapping their content.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.