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I'm looking for a solution to add persistence to my native-code application. It should be simple (no SQL), fast, and most-importantly reliable.

The best approach I can think of is using memory-mapped files. It's as simple and fast as it can get - you simply store the values in plain-data arrays in "memory". However, I don't think it's very reliable - a power failure could leave the database in an inconsistent or corrupted state. Being able to transactionally sync a group of memory-mapped files to disk would solve this, but I don't think it's possible. Also, unless the filesystem supports snapshots or COW cloning (e.g. Brtfs), backups would mean having to stop the application completely while the files are being copied.

Does anyone have better ideas?

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Memory ≠ Persistent. –  coreyward Feb 2 '11 at 6:16
1  
No SQL, how about SQLite? is it just the database you are trying to avoid? SQLite is just a flat file.. –  caesay Feb 2 '11 at 6:18
    
@coreyward: umm, you know what a memory-mapped file is, right? Editing the "memory" a file is mapped to also edits the file on disk, just not immediately. @Tommy: I just want to avoid the pointless conversion to/from strings, string escaping etc. –  CyberShadow Feb 2 '11 at 6:20
    
@CyberShadow: In most of anything you are going to have to some sort of value conversion... –  caesay Feb 2 '11 at 6:23
    
@Tommy: In practice, maybe, but it doesn't have to be. –  CyberShadow Feb 2 '11 at 6:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Tokyo Cabinet
http://fallabs.com/tokyocabinet/

Berkeley DB
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/berkeleydb/overview/index.html

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+1 for Berkeley –  Xepoch Feb 2 '11 at 7:05
    
Berkeley DB looks really sweet, thanks. –  CyberShadow Feb 2 '11 at 8:26

Your list of requirements sounds like Redis. See http://redis.io/ for more.

Another possibility is Cassandra. See http://cassandra.apache.org/ for more on that.

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I think he is looking for a simpler solution. –  arthurprs Feb 2 '11 at 6:22
    
Thanks. I looked at Cassandra but it looked like overkill. Anything that concentrates on scalability will probably be too much for my needs. –  CyberShadow Feb 2 '11 at 6:23

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