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I've been wondering this ever since I started using MS's control templates examples as basis to build custom controls.

take the Label example for instance: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms752327.aspx

why on earth is it defined like this:

<Style x:Key="{x:Type Label}" TargetType="Label">
  <Setter Property="HorizontalContentAlignment" Value="Left" />
  <Setter Property="VerticalContentAlignment" Value="Top" />
  <Setter Property="Template">
    <Setter.Value>
      <ControlTemplate TargetType="Label">
        <Border>
          <ContentPresenter HorizontalAlignment="{TemplateBinding HorizontalContentAlignment}"
                            VerticalAlignment="{TemplateBinding VerticalContentAlignment}"
                            RecognizesAccessKey="True" />
        </Border>
        <ControlTemplate.Triggers>
          <Trigger Property="IsEnabled" Value="false">
            <Setter Property="Foreground">
              <Setter.Value>
                <SolidColorBrush Color="{DynamicResource DisabledForegroundColor}" />
              </Setter.Value>
            </Setter>
          </Trigger>
        </ControlTemplate.Triggers>
      </ControlTemplate>
    </Setter.Value>
  </Setter>
</Style>

and not like this directly:

<ControlTemplate x:Key="{x:Type Label}" TargetType="Label">
    <Border>
      <ContentPresenter HorizontalAlignment="{TemplateBinding HorizontalContentAlignment}"
                        VerticalAlignment="{TemplateBinding VerticalContentAlignment}"
                        RecognizesAccessKey="True" />
    </Border>
    <ControlTemplate.Triggers>
      <Trigger Property="IsEnabled" Value="false">
        <Setter Property="Foreground">
          <Setter.Value>
            <SolidColorBrush Color="{DynamicResource DisabledForegroundColor}" />
          </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
      </Trigger>
    </ControlTemplate.Triggers>
</ControlTemplate>

and then called as a template directly and not through the style property?

is there a hidden reason I do not see for doing things like this? or is it just one way of doing things and that's it?

(NB: don't tell me this is because of the horizontal and vertical alignment setters! we all know those are the default values for a label and this is basically useless if you keep those values)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Without using a Style it's not possible to automatically assign the template to all instances of a specific control type. Setting x:Key="{x:Type Label}" for the control template does not automatically apply this template to all controls of type Label.

You can make a style apply to all buttons below the declaration in the visual tree by setting the TargetType to Button, but you can't do the same with a template, if you do not wrap it inside a Style that have a Setter for the template.

Also, note that in your example you can exchange

<Style x:Key="{x:Type Label}" TargetType="Label">

With

<Style TargetType="Label">

As the x:Key is set to the TargetType if the x:Key definition is omitted.

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oy, I though it worked the same for templates and styles. I'll try that just to see it with my own eyes (I can't believe those 2 act differently...) as for the second part of your answer, I have to disagree (you saw my other question on the subject). Still haven't found a valid explanation for the behaviour I'm getting, but removing the x:key does not always work as it it supposed to (at least for me...) –  David Feb 2 '11 at 9:22
1  
It's made specifically for styles, that if no style for a control is defined, it will traverse up the visual tree until it finds a style definition with x:Key equal to it's own type, and then it will apply that style to itself. The same logic is not implemented for Templates (or any other kind of resources for that matter), so it's not really that strange ;) –  Øyvind Bråthen Feb 2 '11 at 9:26
    
ok, I saw it with my own eyes. Should have tried that before asking actually. It's even worse than that in fact: you get an error after compiling saying that it is impossible to cast a Style into a ControlTemplate. So this makes sense with what you wrote. I would have thought this would work for Templates as well as Styles... (why not?) –  David Feb 2 '11 at 10:32
    
Why not I'm not sure. But all functionality takes time and money to implement, so maybe this functionality was not deemed important enough compared to other more important features. Technically I see no reason it cannot be implemented this way. But then again, it's not that much more code wrapping it inside a style either. –  Øyvind Bråthen Feb 2 '11 at 11:04

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