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Well my question is pretty self-explanatory. I have a class and I want to ensure that there is just 1 public constructor to this class. Moreover, I also want to ensure that the constuctor should have just 1 parameter. My class will be modified by many different developers, and I am looking for a way to ensure that they do not write any more constructors than are currently specified. Is it possible? If yes, then how?

Note, my class inherits from another class which currently does not have any constructor but it might have in the future. I don't know if this information will affect the answer or not but just thought of adding it.

Please help! Thanks in advance!

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4  
Why do you want to restrict the class to one constructor? Describing the actual problem you want to solve might get you better answers. –  Georg Fritzsche Feb 2 '11 at 9:53
    
Could you clarify what you mean by "ensure"? –  Ani Feb 2 '11 at 9:54
2  
my class inherits from another class which currently does not have any constructor - This is not true. Every class has a constructor, whether you write one explicitly or not (if you don't write one it gets a default constructor). –  Mark Byers Feb 2 '11 at 9:58
2  
I'd personally go with source control and code review as the best method of making sure other developers don't do the wrong thing to the code. If they check in things against the reccomendation you pick it up in a review and roll back their changes. If they have compelling reasons you look embarrassed and change your rules. :) –  Chris Feb 2 '11 at 10:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This could be achieved using reflection. The only thing you need to take care is, the base class code shouldn't be accessible to or editable by developers.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Inherited obj = new Inherited("Alpha");
        obj.test();

        Inherited1 obj1 = new Inherited1(); //This will fail as there is no ctor with single param.
        obj1.test();
    }
}

public class MyBase
{
    private static IList<string> ValidatedClasses = new List<string>();

   public MyBase()
   {
      if(!ValidatedClasses.Contains(this.GetType().FullName) && 
          !ValidateConstructorLogic())
      {
          throw new ApplicationException("Expected consturctor with single argument");
      }
   }

    public bool ValidateConstructorLogic()
    {
        bool ValidConstFound = false;

        foreach (var info in this.GetType().GetConstructors())
        {
            if(info.GetParameters().Length ==1)
            {
                lock (ValidatedClasses)
                {
                    ValidatedClasses.Add(this.GetType().FullName);    
                } 

                ValidConstFound = true;
            }

        }

        return ValidConstFound;
    }
}

public class Inherited:MyBase
{
    public Inherited(string test)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Ctor");
    }

    public void test()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("TEST called");
    }
}

public class Inherited1 : MyBase
{

    public void test()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("TEST called");
    }
}

You could use FxCop to validate your code against a set of predefined rules. I beleive this might be the apt solution to your problem. If you need help on creating custom FxCop rules, please refer this article.

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Fantastic Abraham..!!! This is what i wanted..!!! Thanks a million..!!! –  samar Feb 2 '11 at 11:22
2  
This solution adds a heavy runtime performance penalty to a situation which will never change at runtime. Surely you are better enforcing these constraints outside of the runtime environment. Also, the solution requires that developers not change a different class. Is this not just shifting the problem from one class to another? –  Tim Lloyd Feb 2 '11 at 11:46
    
@chibacity: "Is this not just shifting the problem from one class to another?" Maybe but it would be better to maintain 1 class than hundreds of classes. –  samar Feb 2 '11 at 11:49
1  
@samar You want to constrain hundreds of classes to have one constructor, and increase the ctor time by a factor of 1000? And only find out about violations at runtime - perhaps after you have released the software? –  Tim Lloyd Feb 2 '11 at 11:51
4  
If this solution were used in the real world, it would be a good candidate for "The Daily WTF". And of course, your developers will simply change their classes to derive from a less broken base class, which will defeat your purpose. –  Joe Feb 2 '11 at 12:18

You could consider writing a unit test to encode this design constraint. As long as the test isn't fiddled with, this will warn when the contraint is broken.

This would be a good case for a nice comment in your class detailing this constraint.

The following testing approach can be expanded to provide a test which could test derived types, rather than a single type. This approach is a type of static analysis, and removes the overhead that would be incurred by expensive runtime checking through reflection for instance. A test ensures that the design constraint is validated at build time, rather than at runtime which could be after code is released.

[Test]
public void myClass_must_have_one_single_paramter_ctor()
{
    Type type = typeof(MyClass);

    const BindingFlags Flags = (BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);

    ConstructorInfo[] ctors = type.GetConstructors(Flags);

    Assert.AreEqual(1, ctors.Length, "Ctor count.");

    ParameterInfo[] args = ctors[0].GetParameters();

    Assert.AreEqual(1, args.Length, "Ctor parameter count.");

    Assert.AreEqual(typeof(string), args[0].ParameterType, "Ctor parameter type.");
}

public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass(string woo) {}
}
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1  
+1 - the only sensible way to do this is at build time - either a unit test, or perhaps a code analysis rule. –  Joe Feb 2 '11 at 12:22
    
Where should i add this method? I have never added such methods. Please guide me. –  samar Feb 2 '11 at 12:25
    
@samar Do you have a build system for your project? –  Tim Lloyd Feb 2 '11 at 12:27
    
Build System??? What is that? Never heard of it. –  samar Feb 2 '11 at 12:32
    
@samar You have many developers, and no build system - and by the looks of it no unit tests either - ok. A build system is responsible for performing automated builds of your software. As well as compiling your software, it is typically responsible for running other tasks such as test suites. In this way changes made by members of the development team are automatically and continuously integrated into the product and built and usually at a minimum automatically tested (the code above is an example of a test). These days it's pretty standard practice (I hope) and a basic quality hallmark. –  Tim Lloyd Feb 2 '11 at 12:39

All classes have one constructor. If you don't specify one in the source code, the compiler will add an empty public constructor - the equivalent of:

public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass()
    {
    }
}

However if you specify at least one constructor in the source, only the constructors that you explicitly specify will be created, e.g. the following class has one public constructor that takes a single string parameter:

public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass(string myParameter)
    {
        ...
    }
}

In short, there's nothing special you need to do. If you only want one public constructor then ... just write one public constructor.

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Yes that is true. But in my case my class gets modified by many developers and i want to ensure that they do not write any more constructors of the class than that currently specified. Is it possible? –  samar Feb 2 '11 at 10:28
    
Samar, I think it is not possible to restrict other developers who are working on same code to add constructors to the class. –  Manoj Feb 2 '11 at 10:42

Only the person who codes the class can restrict the number and type of constructors. So if that is you, then you can just code it the way you want.

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In my case my class gets modified by many developers and i want to ensure that they do not write any more constructors of the class than that currently specified. Is it possible? –  samar Feb 2 '11 at 10:28
    
I think his answer is probably still true. If you are not the person then that other person can code it the way they want. –  Chris Feb 2 '11 at 10:36
    
@samar Well, for one thing: you can't define restrictions on constructors in the interface. –  Peladao Feb 2 '11 at 10:50

Constructors are not inherited from base classes.

Your class will have only the constructors that you write, except for (as others have pointed out) a default public constructor that is generated by the compiler when you do not explicitly provide one of your own.

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Yes that is true. But in my case my class gets modified by many developers and i want to ensure that they do not write any more constructors of the class than that currently specified. Is it possible? –  samar Feb 2 '11 at 10:27
    
@samar: I see. It's not clear from your question that your class is subject to being modified by other developers. And no, as far as I know, there's no built-in way to do that, aside from commenting. If you can't trust your team members any more than that... –  Cody Gray Feb 2 '11 at 10:29

You could try using a nested builder, as described by Jon Skeet. Basically: You force the user to go through the builder which then calls the private class constructor. Since the class constructor is private, only the nested builder has access to it.

Alternative: Use static factory methods, make the constructor private & document your intentions.

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Based on your comments, I don't think this is a "coding" problem. This is a policy & enforcement problem. You don't want other developers in your team creating more constructors.

In that case, go tell them that. Whoever is in charge of your source code repository can enforce it by rejecting changes that break the policy. Adding code to deal with this is just going to add runtime penalties to users for no reason.

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