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What I want to do is really simple. I have a class which handles my database executions called clsSQLInterface. This class contains a static function called bool isSQLSafe which will return false if the SQL being sent for execution is considered dangerous. This is so I have one point where I can filter out any malicious goings on.

Now, another part of my program actually needs to be able to do things like UPDATE, DELETE etc. So I thought I would inherit the clsSQLInterface class and override the isSQLSafe function with something that always returns true.

This isn't a question about database secutrity btw!

Ok so I did this like this...

public class clsSQLInterface //Code not shown, just definitions
{
  private static string connectionString(string sKey){...}

  public static bool isSQLSafe(string sSQL){...}

  public static DataTable executeSQLText(string sSQL, string sConnectionKey){...}

  public static DataTable executeGenericQuery(clsGenericSQL query,string sDBKey){...}
}

And the overriding class..

public class clsSQLInterface_unsafe : clsSQLInterface
{
    public clsSQLInterface_unsafe()
    {   
    }

    public new static bool isSQLSafe(string sSQL) //overriding the base method
    { return true; }
}

Ok. The problem with this approach is that isSQLSafe is called from within the methods executeSQLText and executeGenericQuery. What I want these methods to do is call the overridden isSQLSafe which always returns true. However, they don't. They call the base implementation.

Do I also have to override every method which calls isSQLSafe? This seems like a waste of code.

Surely when I inherit the class I am effectively 'copying' all the base methods and they should behave as though they are now part of clsSQLInterface_unsafe?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure what you are doing here, everything is static. There's not much inheritance going on really. You are just declaring a new static method hiding the old ones. –  Skurmedel Feb 2 '11 at 10:06
3  
Horrible naming convention: why you prefix your classes with cls ? –  Felice Pollano Feb 2 '11 at 10:06
    
@Felice So I know that anything starting cls is one of my classes. –  El Ronnoco Feb 2 '11 at 10:07
1  
Im willing to bet that you can't implement isSQLSafe in such a way as to protect yourself fully against SQL Injection Attacks. But then again, this isnt about database security so you go for it. –  Jamiec Feb 2 '11 at 10:09
1  
@El Ronnoco, if your classes are in a namespace, then you don't need a naming convention to tell that they are actaully yours... –  Paolo Tedesco Feb 2 '11 at 10:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You cannot override static methods. They are not inherited, they are methods of the class, not of an instance of the class. A static method in the base class will always call the static method in the same class.
Just making the methods not static and virtual, then overriding them in the derived class should solve your problem.

EDIT: the new static modifier just tells the compiler that you intend to hide the method of the base class (try to remove it and see the warning you get), but it does not override anything.

Overriding means that the derived class version of the function is taking the place of the base class version in the virtual table.
The virtual table is an index of the methods associated to an instance. No instance, no virtual table, therefore you cannot override a static method.

P.S: have a look at a better explaination of what is a virtual table here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_method_table

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't saying public new static bool isSQLSafe act as an override? –  El Ronnoco Feb 2 '11 at 10:09
    
This is the answer. –  Felice Pollano Feb 2 '11 at 10:10
    
@El Ronnoco, you really can't override any static method. –  Felice Pollano Feb 2 '11 at 10:11
    
So all calls to clsSQLInterface which currently do not use an instance must first new one? :( –  El Ronnoco Feb 2 '11 at 10:14
    
plus a few virtual and override? –  pascal Feb 2 '11 at 10:18

The problems comes from the static modifier.

You may reconsider refactor your code using, why not, something like this :

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;

    namespace ConsoleApplication1
    {
        public abstract class BaseSqlInterface
        {
            protected abstract bool IsSafe(string instruction);

            public void Execute(string sqlStatement)
            {
                if (IsSafe(sqlStatement))
                {
                    // run the sql command
                }
                else
                {
                    throw new Exception("You're evil");
                }
            }
        }

        public class SqlInterfaceSafe : BaseSqlInterface
        {
            public override bool IsSafe(string instruction)
            {
                return instruction.Contains("I'm not evil, I promise");
            }
        }
        public class SqlInterfaceUnsafe : BaseSqlInterface
        {
            public override  bool IsSafe(string instruction)
            {
                return true;
            }
        }


        public static class SqlInterfaceFactory
        {
            public static BaseSqlInterface GetInstance()
            {
                // return the actual object using IOC, switch, ... whichever method you want
                return DateTime.Now.Day % 2 == 0 ? (BaseSqlInterface)new SqlInterfaceSafe() : new SqlInterfaceUnsafe();
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks, this is an interesting approach. –  El Ronnoco Feb 2 '11 at 10:23
    
@El ronnoco: it's a vast subject, but you may take a look at design pattern techniques such Inversion of COntrol, dependency injections, object model programming in general. It can often solve such problems. With a bit of practice, you will be quickly aware of which pattern can solve a specific problem. –  Steve B Feb 2 '11 at 10:26
    
Thanks, I have looked at some design patterns and as usual, the problems usually arise when you don't decide early enough what pattern fits best. Good to know them though and apply them correctly. –  El Ronnoco Feb 2 '11 at 10:32

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