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Im relativly new to WCF and/but "seem" to have got most things up and working.

I have the following IEndpointBehavior and IClientMessageInspector that I want to append when calling the service. It appends a token (HTTPHeader) that I want to check serverside (IIS)

public class AuthenticationTokenEndpointBehavior : IEndpointBehavior
{
    #region Member variables

    public class AuthenticationTokenMessageInspector : IClientMessageInspector
    {
        public void AfterReceiveReply(ref Message reply, object correlationState)
        {
            //throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        public object BeforeSendRequest(ref Message request, IClientChannel channel)
        {
            string token = AuthenticationTokenManager.CreateToken();

            HttpRequestMessageProperty httpRequestMessage;
            object httpRequestMessageObject;
            if (request.Properties.TryGetValue(HttpRequestMessageProperty.Name, out httpRequestMessageObject))
            {
                httpRequestMessage = httpRequestMessageObject as HttpRequestMessageProperty;
            }
            else
            {
                httpRequestMessage = new HttpRequestMessageProperty();
                request.Properties.Add(HttpRequestMessageProperty.Name, httpRequestMessage);
            }

            httpRequestMessage.Headers[AuthenticationTokenManager.AUTHENTICATION_TOKEN_NAME] = token;

            return null;
        }

    #endregion

    #region Methods

    public void AddBindingParameters(ServiceEndpoint endpoint, BindingParameterCollection bindingParameters)
    {
        //throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void ApplyClientBehavior(ServiceEndpoint endpoint, ClientRuntime clientRuntime)
    {
        AuthenticationTokenMessageInspector inspector = new AuthenticationTokenMessageInspector();
        clientRuntime.MessageInspectors.Add(inspector);
    }

    public void ApplyDispatchBehavior(ServiceEndpoint endpoint, EndpointDispatcher endpointDispatcher)
    {
        //throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Validate(ServiceEndpoint endpoint)
    {
        //throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    #endregion
}

I have inherited and overriden the clientproxys CreateChannel, in which I append my IEndpointBehavior.

protected override ITheService CreateChannel()
    {
        this.Endpoint.Behaviors.Add(new AuthenticationTokenEndpointBehavior());
        return base.CreateChannel();
    }

This works very well for most of my bindings except when using <security mode="Message">. The headers are not sent to the server. Ive have googled abit but not found any information about this issue.

UPDATE 1: To clarify, the IClientMessageInspector.BeforeSendRequest IS called but no headers appears on the serverside.

UPDATE 2: I tried add a SoapHeader (MessageHeader) instead but no luck. Is there some sort of security "handshake" involved before the first request??

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2 Answers 2

Responding to your Update 2: depending on the exact configuration of your binding there may very well be a preliminary exchange of SOAP messages carrying WS-Trust security token request/response, before your application messages are exchanged. For example the default configuration of message security for the wsHttpBinding will do this.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply! You wouldnt know if I somehow can "intercept" and append to the WS-Trust security token request? –  BaxterBoom Feb 3 '11 at 6:57
    
@Loppus: Most things are possible in WCF if you're prepared to do what it takes - this could I think in theory be done by wrapping/replacing the StreamUpgradeProvider which implements the security layer in the channel stack - but what would this achieve? You almost certainly don't want to go there. Could you perhaps explain, at a higher level, what problem you are trying to solve, as there is probably a better approach. –  Chris Dickson Feb 3 '11 at 9:36
    
as "always" this is a fast/quick/easy implementation of securing communication with (web)services. So it must work both for WCF (wsHttpBinding) and asmx services. I have a HTTPMoule i in which i inspect if the current request is a soap message. I then check if the message contains the AuthenticationToken (HttpHeader). If not throw invalid AuthenticationTokenException else validate and throw if invalid. Thats about it. –  BaxterBoom Feb 3 '11 at 9:46
    
@Loppus: Could you not just change your HTTPModule to allow through SOAP messages having soap:Action http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2005/02/trust/RST/Issue, without requiring them to have your special header? –  Chris Dickson Feb 3 '11 at 11:29
    
i kinda do, since im new to WCF i was lookng for the RequestSecurityToken instead. I read msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms733927.aspx regarding the "url" you suggested. But I dont fully understand. Is this a "safe" method to use?. My token is replay secure (can only be used once), is that the same for Securitymode.Message? –  BaxterBoom Feb 3 '11 at 13:11

I solved this using IDispatchMessageInspector at the serviceend for WCF calls. Not the easy/quick way, with the HTTPModule validation, I was looking for. But it turned out ok. @Chris Dickson, thanks for your time!

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You're welcome. Even more so if you felt inclined to express your thanks in an upvote :-) –  Chris Dickson Feb 3 '11 at 18:06
    
@Chris Dickson, done :) –  BaxterBoom Feb 4 '11 at 10:23

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