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I have a stored procedure that has three parameters and I've been trying to use the following to return the results:

context.Database.SqlQuery<myEntityType>("mySpName", param1, param2, param3);

At first I tried using SqlParameter objects as the params but this didn't work and threw a SqlException with the following message:

Procedure or function 'mySpName' expects parameter '@param1', which was not supplied.

So my question is how you can use this method with a stored procedure that expects parameters?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What version of SQL Server are you using? I'm having trouble with code that works on 2008 in compat (90) mode, but when i run it against 2005 it fails with a syntax error. – Gats Feb 2 '11 at 17:18
3  
@Gats - I had the same issue w/ SQL 2005. Add "EXEC" before the stored procedure name. I posted this info here for future reference: stackoverflow.com/questions/6403930/… – Dan Mork Jun 19 '11 at 17:26
up vote 202 down vote accepted

You should supply the SqlParameter instances in the following way:

context.Database.SqlQuery<myEntityType>(
    "mySpName @param1, @param2, @param3",
    new SqlParameter("param1", param1),
    new SqlParameter("param2", param2),
    new SqlParameter("param3", param3)
);
share|improve this answer
2  
How would you make this method work with nullable types? I tried this with nullable decimals, but when the decimals are null I get errors saying parameter is missing. However, the method below mentioned by @DanMork works find. – Paul Johnson Mar 15 '12 at 20:11
    
Does passing DbNull.Value instead of nulls solve the problem? – Alireza Sep 5 '12 at 11:11
19  
You can also use the \@p# syntax to avoid using SqlParameter as in context.Database.SqlQuery<myEntityType("mySpName \@p0, \@p1, \@p2", param1, param2, param3). Source: msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/data/jj592907. (Note: had to use \@ to avoid user notifications, should be read without the backslash.) – Marco Nov 1 '12 at 22:17
2  
If you are using DateTime parameters, you need to specify the parameter type too, not only name and value. For example: dbContext.Database.SqlQuery<Invoice>("spGetInvoices @dateFrom, @dateTo", new SqlParameter { ParameterName = "dateFrom", SqlDbType = SqlDbType.DateTime, Value = startDate }, new SqlParameter { ParameterName = "dateTo", SqlDbType = SqlDbType.DateTime, Value = endDate }); Another important thing is to respect the order of the parameters. – Francisco Goldenstein Jul 21 '14 at 17:56
    
can you kindly check what I am doing wrong I have follow you guidline but no effect at all stackoverflow.com/questions/27926598/… – toxic Jan 13 '15 at 20:31

Also, you can use the "sql" parameter as a format specifier:

context.Database.SqlQuery<MyEntityType>("mySpName @param1 = {0}", param1)
share|improve this answer
    
Had to up-vote this. While it wasn't accepted as the answer, its a much easier to write solution than the one selected as answer. – Nikkoli Oct 2 '12 at 18:43
5  
This syntax concerns me a little bit. Would it be susceptible to SQL injection? I would assume EF is running "EXEC mySpName @Param1 = ", and it would be possible to send "x' GO [malicious script]" and cause some problems? – Tom Halladay Oct 5 '12 at 17:45
7  
@TomHalladay no risk of SQL injection - the method will still quote and escape the parameters based on their type, the same as the @ style params. So for a string parameter you would use "SELECT * FROM Users WHERE email={0}" without quotes in your statement. – Ross McNab Feb 14 '13 at 11:52
    
in my case we have lots of optional parameters for SP and did not work calls with SqlParameters but this format do the trick, just had to add 'EXEC' in the beginning. Thanks. – Onur Topal Apr 10 '13 at 12:23
    
@ TomHalladay It actually have SQL injection problems (and also problem if your parameters have some simple quotes.) @OnurTOPAL you can deal null values with myparam ?? "NULL" – gilles emmanuel Aug 28 '14 at 15:28

This solution is (only) for SQL Server 2005

You guys are lifesavers, but as @Dan Mork said, you need to add EXEC to the mix. What was tripping me up was:

  • 'EXEC ' before the Proc Name
  • Commas in between Params
  • Chopping off '@' on the Param Definitions (not sure that bit is required though).

:

context.Database.SqlQuery<EntityType>(
    "EXEC ProcName @param1, @param2", 
    new SqlParameter("param1", param1), 
    new SqlParameter("param2", param2)
);
share|improve this answer
15  
+1. Neither of the higher voted answers include exec, but I can confirm that I get an exception if I omit it. – Jordan Gray Oct 5 '12 at 13:46
    
Thank you, I was getting an error, added EXEC and error is gone. The weird part was if i did context.Database.SqlQuery<EntityType>("ProcName '" + param1 + "','" + param2 + "'"); it worked, but if I added parameters it didn't work until I added the EXEC keyword. – Solmead Jan 10 '14 at 21:58
2  
FYI: I do not require the exec keyword. +1 for the removal of the @ on the params, that always messes me up. – Nathan Koop Jan 30 '14 at 17:46
    
+1, I was missing EXEC and kept getting SqlExceptions with message: Incorrect syntax near 'procName'. – A. Murray Feb 13 '14 at 14:39
1  
@Ziggler are you on 2005 or newer? The EXEC keyword has mainly been an issue for those of us going against 2005. – Tom Halladay Mar 31 '15 at 17:38
return context.Database.SqlQuery<myEntityType>("mySpName {0}, {1}, {2}",
new object[] { param1, param2, param3 });

//Or

using(var context = new MyDataContext())
{
return context.Database.SqlQuery<myEntityType>("mySpName {0}, {1}, {2}",
new object[] { param1, param2, param3 }).ToList();
}

//Or

using(var context = new MyDataContext())
{
object[] parameters =  { param1, param2, param3 };

return context.Database.SqlQuery<myEntityType>("mySpName {0}, {1}, {2}",
parameters).ToList();
}

//Or

using(var context = new MyDataContext())
{  
return context.Database.SqlQuery<myEntityType>("mySpName {0}, {1}, {2}",
param1, param2, param3).ToList();
}
share|improve this answer
    
it is working for me for Assembly EntityFramework.dll, v4.4.0.0 – ThulasiRam Oct 18 '12 at 14:37
1  
if you are using using(var context = new MyDataContext()) then .ToList() is mandatory. – ThulasiRam Oct 18 '12 at 14:41

I use this method:

var results = this.Database.SqlQuery<yourEntity>("EXEC [ent].[GetNextExportJob] {0}", ProcessorID);

I like it because I just drop in Guids and Datetimes and SqlQuery performs all the formatting for me.

share|improve this answer

I had the same error message when I was working with calling a stored procedure that takes two input parameters and returns 3 values using SELECT statement and I solved the issue like below in EF Code First Approach

 SqlParameter @TableName = new SqlParameter()
        {
            ParameterName = "@TableName",
            DbType = DbType.String,
            Value = "Trans"
        };

SqlParameter @FieldName = new SqlParameter()
        {
            ParameterName = "@FieldName",
            DbType = DbType.String,
            Value = "HLTransNbr"
        };


object[] parameters = new object[] { @TableName, @FieldName };

List<Sample> x = this.Database.SqlQuery<Sample>("EXEC usp_NextNumberBOGetMulti @TableName, @FieldName", parameters).ToList();


public class Sample
{
    public string TableName { get; set; }
    public string FieldName { get; set; }
    public int NextNum { get; set; }
}

UPDATE: It looks like with SQL SERVER 2005 missing EXEC keyword is creating problem. So to allow it to work with all SQL SERVER versions I updated my answer and added EXEC in below line

 List<Sample> x = this.Database.SqlQuery<Sample>(" EXEC usp_NextNumberBOGetMulti @TableName, @FieldName", parameters).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
Please see below link. There is no need to use exec msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/jj592907.aspx – Ziggler Mar 31 '15 at 16:56

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