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git status shows a bunch of files which were modified and some which were deleted. I want to first commit the modified files and then the deleted ones. I don't see any option in git add that enables me to do this. How can I do it?

EDIT: As pointed out, git add wouldn't have staged the deleted files anyway, so git add . would do. But it has the side-effect of including files which weren't tracked, which I would also like to avoid. I have changed the title of the question accordingly.

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4 Answers 4

The following command should do the trick:

git commit -a

or

git commit -am "commit message"

From the Pro Git book:

Providing the -a option to the git commit command makes Git automatically stage every file that is already tracked before doing the commit

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is there any downside to using mutliple flags so as to add message as well? eg git commit -am "updated files" –  sayth Feb 18 at 19:29
1  
@sayth, in this case, there is no downside. It is a matter of preference - one may want to use a text editor for writing commit messages. –  tokarev Feb 19 at 9:07
up vote 13 down vote accepted

git diff --name-only --diff-filter=M | xargs git add

(based on Charles Bailey's answer on a related question)

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4  
Its a bit cumbersome to do so much just to push modified files. Don't you think? –  Cherian Mar 24 '11 at 3:31

I may be missing something but git add doesn't include deleted files, you have to use git rm to remove those:

mkdir git-test
cd git-test
git init
touch a
touch b
touch c
git add .
git commit -m "Initial"
echo "a" > a
echo "b" > b
rm c
git status

# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   a
#       modified:   b
#       deleted:    c
#

git add .

# On branch master
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#       modified:   a
#       modified:   b
#
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       deleted:    c
#

git commit -m "Changed"
git status

# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       deleted:    c
#

git rm c
git commit -m "Deleted"

And git log shows three commits.

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You are right that git add wouldn't have staged the deleted files (being very new to git, I didn't know that yet -- thanks). But git add . seems to add untracked files, which is something I would like to avoid, so the xargs answer still has some usefulness. –  Pedro d'Aquino Feb 2 '11 at 12:05
    
Do you still at some point want to add those untracked files? If not, then you could add them to the .gitignore file. –  Makis Feb 2 '11 at 12:50
    
I didn't know about .gitignore, thanks. My current need is simply to organize the commits so they actually reflect one atomic operation (e.g. "fixed bug" is separated from "added feature"), so these files will be commited at some point in the future. –  Pedro d'Aquino Feb 2 '11 at 16:43

I would be careful with using git commit -a -- unless you have made sure that your .gitignore file has ALL files that you do NOT want added there

I have used git commit -a many times in areas where this was not the case, and I ended up having to clean up / delete temporary files etc. from git repository

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