Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

can someone pls tell me how can i execute my HelloWorld.java in apache hadoop which contains

class Helloworld  
{  
  public static void main(String[] args)  
   {  
    Sytem.out.println("HelloWorld");  
    }  
 }

Am running a single node. Kindly tell me how can i run this piece of code or pls a send a link which is understandable for an absolute beginner.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The way a jar is run in hadoop is by the command

$HADOOP_HOME/bin/hadoop jar [your_jar_file]

You can also use -jar to force it to run as a local job. Useful for playing and debugging.

While I haven't tested with such a simple application, I think it should print the line and then be done. Don't hold me to that though. :-P

You might need to specify main throws Exception but I'm not 100% on that. My code has it.

I hope that helps. As mentioned in other answers, without getting into setting up Jobs and MapReduce, there's not going to be a gain from Hadoop.

share|improve this answer
    
yes!! thats exactly what i wanted, the syntax to run it as a local job. I tried so many ways but couldnt figure it out.Thanks. –  emiljho Feb 3 '11 at 14:00

As far as I understand the apache hadoop is irrelevant in your case. You question is "how to run hello world written in java"?

If my assumption is correct, do the following.

  1. install JDK
  2. compile your java code using command javac Helloworld.java. You have to run this from directory where your code is. The JAVA_HOME/bin should be in your path.
  3. If #2 succeeded you should be able to see Helloworld.class at your working directory. Now run it by typing java Helloworld

Search for any java tutorial for beginners for details. good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
I know its irrelevent. but i wanna know how we run a java program through hadoop. To get started I went for a simple program. Can you tell me then how to run java programs(simple ones) in hadoop? Thank you –  emiljho Feb 2 '11 at 14:21
    
Wordcount example is the helloworld of hadoop. Go through that –  Harsha Hulageri Feb 24 '11 at 7:41

Short answer: You don't.

Hadoop doesn't run java applications in the general sense. It runs Map Reduce jobs, which can be written in java, but don't have to be. You should probably start with reading some of the apache hadoop documentation. Here's the Map Reduce tutorial. You might also want to look at Tom White's book "Hadoop: the definitive guide".

Hadoop is a batch oriented large scaled data processing system. It's really only suited to applications in that problem space. If those aren't the kind of problems you're trying to solve, Hadoop isn't what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
in short you mean a simple helloworld problem wont run in hadoop?? –  emiljho Feb 2 '11 at 15:48
2  
problem lol, no it's not meant to execute some hello world stuff. look at wordcount and look for what kind of work you are using that. –  Thomas Jungblut Feb 2 '11 at 19:35

You need to look at how Map Reduce works. You may want to look at the src of the hadoop examples to get a feel of how the Map Reduce programs are written.

share|improve this answer

Standalone Operation By default, Hadoop is configured to run in a non-distributed mode, as a single Java process. This is useful for debugging.

The following example copies the unpacked conf directory to use as input and then finds and displays every match of the given regular expression. Output is written to the given output directory.

$ mkdir input 
$ cp conf/*.xml input 
$ bin/hadoop jar hadoop-*-examples.jar grep input output 'dfs[a-z.]+' 
$ cat output/*

see here: http://hadoop.apache.org/docs/r0.18.2/quickstart.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.