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Sorry about the stupid title, had no idea how to word this

I'm creating a class that has two lists of the same type. It's used to copy a reference to a object in the first list to the second list.

While both lists will be of the same type (hold the same type of object) it can be different each time this class is initialized.

So I'm guessing I should make the List types as some kind of abstract list. I would like to ensure they will be strongly typed when instanced (but not neccesary if problematic). The problem is inside the method that moves selected items from list1 to list2 abstract list types normally don't have methods for that.

I guess the normal solution would be to make the class generic ( className<T> thingy ) but I'm not sure I can do that ( at least I don't know how ) because this class inherits a WPF UserControl.

Here is the Code:

public partial class SubsetSelectionLists : UserControl
{
    public static DependencyProperty SetCollectionProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("SetCollection", typeof("Need a abstract list type here"), typeof(SubsetSelectionLists));
    public static DependencyProperty SubsetCollectionProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("SubsetCollection", typeof("Need a abstract list type here"), typeof(SubsetSelectionLists));

    public "Need a abstract list type here" SetCollection
    {
        get
        {
            return ("Need a abstract list type here") GetValue(SetCollectionProperty);
        }
        set
        {
            SetValue(SetCollectionProperty, value);
        }
    }

    public "Need a abstract list type here" SubsetCollection
    {
        get
        {
            return ("Need a abstract list type here")GetValue(SubsetCollectionProperty);
        }
        set
        {
            SetValue(SubsetCollectionProperty, value);
        }
    }

    public SubsetSelectionLists()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        SubsetSelectiongrid.DataContext = this;
    }

    private void selectionBtnClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        SubsetCollection.AddTheseItems(SET.SelecctedItems)
    }

    private void removeBtnClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        SUBSET.RemoveTheseItems(SUBSET.SelectedItem);
    }
}

EDIT: Solution

Some answers pointed me towards the optimal solution of creating a Generic Class. However this can be problematic in WPF. You would have to skip the XAML on the top level generic class.

This would mean that you could do the XAML in the type specific child classes which isn't something you would like to do (unless only the code is something you would re-use but the look is variable). You could also have designed the control using code I guess but I'm not sure how effective that would be.

I was pointed towards the IList object which is a abstract list that many others inherit from and I'm gonna use. It's a bit of a hack but as this will not be used in a open library I'm ok with it. Otherwise I would use the Generic Route.

share|improve this question
    
any reason you can't do it in linq? do you have limitations on your version of .net? –  phillip Feb 2 '11 at 12:51
    
What .net version. Linq and generics should be able to do that –  Hawxby Feb 2 '11 at 12:54
2  
I do not understand how linq could help me here? Please commit a answer for how its done. I'm using .net 3.5 but will probably upgrade to 4.0 –  Ingó Vals Feb 2 '11 at 13:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't know how well the designers play with user controls that are generic classes. If that is a problem (which I would guess), one way to get away from that is to expose the collections IList but still use List<T> that are constructed in runtime to have type safety in the storage (code sample reduced to include only list object creation and properties for exposing them; add code for DependencyProperty and so on as needed):

public class YourControl : UserControl
{

    // this method will set up the internal lists for accepting
    // objects of the specified type only
    public void SetListType(Type containedType)
    {
        var listType = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(new[] { containedType });
        SetCollection = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance(listType);
        SubsetCollection = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance(listType);
    }
    public IList SetCollection { get; private set; }
    public IList SubsetCollection { get; private set; }
}

// usage example:
theControl.SetListType(typeof(string));
theControl.SetCollection.Add("some string"); // works ok
theControl.SetCollection.Add(42); // fails, 42 is not a string

The obvious downside is that SetCollection and SubsetCollection expose "untyped" object lists.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok this one was useful. I can use IList because it implements the Add method. I just put IList everywhere it says "Need a abstract list type here" and then ensure I tie a list (ObservableCollection in my case) that inherits IList. Each list will be type-safe but I do not ensure they have the same type. –  Ingó Vals Feb 2 '11 at 13:42

Something like this or am i shooting wide of the mark?

public partial class SubsetSelectionLists<T> : UserControl
{
    public List<T> SetCollection { get; set; }

    public List<T> SubsetCollection { get; set; }

    public SubsetSelectionLists()
    {
        SubsetSelectiongrid.DataContext = this;
    }

    private void selectionBtnClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        SubsetCollection.AddRange(SetCollection);
    }

    private void removeBtnClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        SubsetCollection.RemoveAll(x => SetCollection.Contains(x));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well as I said in my question this is how it would normally be done. However as it inherits from a WPF userControl it doesn't seem to work. –  Ingó Vals Feb 2 '11 at 13:10
    
I would mark the class as abstract and then create control classes which inherit from it so you can specify a type. –  Hawxby Feb 2 '11 at 13:22
    
I would still need to inherit the UserControl class originally and this would ensure I'd have to skip the XAML code and design the look in code or at each child (which is what i'm trying to avoid in the first place). I could use your way if I skip the partial thingy and ignore the XAML so I'm giving you a vote for useful. –  Ingó Vals Feb 2 '11 at 13:51

As you say, a generic class is the way to achieve this and you can do it when inheriting from a non-generic parent class, e.g.

  partial class GenericClass1<T> : UserControl
  {
    private List<T> _list;
  }

EDIT based on comments below

Define typed classes that fix the generic type in the above class (and can be used by the designer), i.e.

partial class IntClass1 : GenericClass1<int> {}

partial class StringClass1 : GenericClass1<string> {}

....

Of course this only really works if you have a limited/static set of types you want to hold in your lists

share|improve this answer
    
As long as the non-generic parent isn't a WPF UserControl class. I tried to do this, notice it being a partial class and the reast of the class is declared in XAML. I found post claiming you can't make generic user controls. –  Ingó Vals Feb 2 '11 at 13:12
    
Once you've got your generic class defined you can you not then define typed subclasses that will work as WPF user controls? –  John Pickup Feb 2 '11 at 13:21
    
The problem is I can't define the other half of the partial as generic, the code that is in XAML that is. The class just wouldn't compile. I could create the class without the XAML part but then I would need to design the look (that would be the same in all the subclasses as well) in code or in all subclasses which I want not to have happen. I'm marking your post as useful. –  Ingó Vals Feb 2 '11 at 13:44

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