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Could someone please help me understand the concept of memory leaking and how specific data structures promote/prevent it (e.g. linked lists, arrays etc). I've been taught it twice by 2 different people a while ago - which has confused me slightly because of the differences in teaching methods.

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So now you're asking for a third explanation, using yet another method? –  Matti Virkkunen Feb 2 '11 at 14:41
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I'm hoping someone will follow a similar methodology to one of the different explanations to make it concrete. Happy? –  user559142 Feb 3 '11 at 23:03
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Wikipedia has a good description on memory leaks. The defintion given there is:

A memory leak, in computer science (or leakage, in this context), occurs 
when a computer program consumes memory but is unable to release it back 
to the operating system.

For example, the following C function leaks memory:

void leaky(int n)
{
    char* a = malloc(n);
    char* b = malloc(n);
    // Do something with a
    // Do something with b
    free(a);
}

The above function leaks n bytes of memory as the programmer forgot to call free(b). What that means is that the operating system has n bytes less memory to satisfy further calls to malloc. If the program calls leaky many times, the OS may eventually run out of memory that it could allocate for other tasks.

As for the second part of your question, there is nothing intrinsic to data structures that makes them leak memory, but a careless implementation of a data structure could leak memory. As an example, consider the following function that deletes an element from a linked list:

// I guess you could figure out where memory is leaking and fix it.

void delete_element(ListNode* node, int key)
{
    if (node != NULL)
    {
        if (node->key == key)
        {
            if (node->prev != NULL) {
                // Unlink the node from the list.
                node->prev->next = node->next;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            delete_element(node->next, key);
        }  
    }
}
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I agree with Vijay's answer for the most part, but it is important to note that leaks occur when references to heap blocks (pointers) are lost. The two common causes are:

1 - Losing scope of the pointer

void foo(void)
{
    char *s;
    s = strdup("U N I C O R N S ! ! !");
    return;
}

In the above, we've lost scope of the pointer s, so we have absolutely no way to free it. That memory is now lost in (address) space until the program exits and the virtual memory subsystem reclaims everything the process had.

However, if we just changed the function to return strdup("U N I C O R N S ! ! !");, we'd still have reference to the block that strdup() allocated.

2 - Re-assigning pointers without saving the original

 void foo(void)
 {
      unsigned int i;
      char *s;

      for (i=0; i<100; i++)
         s = strdup("U N I C O R N S ! ! !");

      free(s);
  }

In this example, we've lost 99 references to blocks that s once pointed to, so we're only actually freeing one block at the end. Again, this memory is now lost until the OS reclaims it after the program exits.

Another typical misconception is that memory that is still reachable at program exit is leaked if the program does not free it prior to exiting. This has not been true for a very long time. A leak only happens when there is no way to dereference a previously allocated block in order to free it.

It should also be noted that dealing with the static storage type is a little different, as discussed in this answer.

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Basically, a memory leak occurs when a program allocates memory and does not release it even though it is not anymore needed.

  • In languages with manual memory management like C, this happens when the program fails to explicitly free heap memory, i.e. the programmer always has to do something to avoid memory leaks.
  • In garbage collection base languages like Java, it happens when the program inadvertedly keeps references to objects that aren't needed anymore. Very often, this happens when such objects are added to a "global" collection and then "forgotten" (especially when the adding happend implicitly).

As you see from the second point, collections in general tend to be a focus of memory leaks because it's not obvious what they contain, doubly so when they are maintained internally by a long-lived object.

The prototypical memory leak is a cache (i.e. a collection that is maintained implicitly) kept in a static variable (i.e. maximally long-lived).

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The answer provided by Vijay shows you how to produce a memory leak. But finding a leak can be a quite difficult task once your program grows beyond a few lines of code.

If you're on Linux, valgrind can help you to find leaks.

On Windows you could use the CRT Debug Heap, which displays what leaked out, but not where it was allocated. To display where the leaking memory was allocated, you could use the Memory Validator which is quite painless to use: either run your program under the hood of Memory Validator or attach to a running process. No changes in sources are required. They provide a 30 day trial which is fully functional.

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I can't really add to what the others have said in terms of defining memory leaks, but I can give you a few notes on when memory leaks might happen.

The first case that comes to mind is that of a function that does an allocation:

int* somefunction(size_t sz)
{
    int* mem;
    mem = malloc(sz*sizeof(int));
    return mem;
}

There is nothing inheritently wrong with writing a function this way. It's a very similar concept to malloc. The problem is, you now start doing:

int* x = somefunction(5);

And its easy to forget, now that isn't a malloc, to free x. Again, there is nothing about this that means you will forget, but my experience tells me this is the sort of thing I and others overlook.

A good strategy to get around this is to indicate in the function naming that allocation happens. So, call the function somefunction_alloc.

The second case that comes to mind is threads, especially fork(), because the code is all in one place as it were. If you code neatly with functions, multiple files etc you'll almost always avoid errors, but remember that everything must be free'd within some scope, including that which was allocated both post fork() and pre fork. Consider this:

int main()
{
    char* buffer = malloc(100*sizeof(char));
    int fork_result = fork();

    if ( fork_result < 0 )
    {
        printf("Error\n");
        return 1;
    }
    elseif ( fork_result == 0 )
    {
        /* do child stuff */
        return 0;
    }
    else
    {
        /* do parent stuff */
    }

    free(buffer);
    return 0;
}

There is a subtle error here. The parent will not leak any memory, but the child does, because it is an exact copy of the parent, heap included, but it exits before freeing anything. Free must happen on both code paths. Likewise, if the fork fails, you still haven't freed. It is easy to miss things when you're writing code like this. A better method is to create an exit code variable like int status = 0; and modify it where errors occur, and do not use return in any structure but allow child and parent code paths to continue on to the end of the program as they should.

That said, threading and forking always make debugging more difficult due to their nature.

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