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Say i have

        public int MyVariable;

in the Form1.cs file, and I want to access it from Class1.cs , what do you think would be the best way to do that?

Thanks!

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4  
That is really vague question. What is the relationship between those 2 classes? Does your Form1 got a reference to an instance of Class1? –  ArielBH Feb 2 '11 at 14:21
1  
Yup, this question needs far more context to enable it to be answered. –  Jamiec Feb 2 '11 at 14:21
1  
Rob, it seems your urgent need is actually an Object Oriented Basics tutorial. No offence here. –  Vasile Tomoiaga Feb 2 '11 at 14:25
    
"public int MyVariable;" is just a variable "living" in Form1. And what I want is objects created using Class1.cs to be able to access this MyVariable. –  Rob Feb 2 '11 at 14:25
    
I'd suggest that Gunner's answer is better, pass the variable to any function that needs it. Try to make your classes as decoupled from your forms as possible, otherwise any future change might be difficult. –  ho1 Feb 2 '11 at 14:27

5 Answers 5

MSDN: Properties

base class with property:

class Person
{
    private string name;  // the name field
    public string Name    // the Name property
    {
        get
        {
            return name;
        }
        set
        {
            name = value;
        }
    }
}

Auto Implemented Properties (if advanced work on "name" isn't needed):

class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; } // the Name property with hidden backing field
}

Class accessing the property:

Person person = new Person();
person.Name = "Joe";  // the set accessor is invoked here                

System.Console.Write(person.Name);  // the get accessor is invoked here
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This is the one of the best practices, and as a common standard used every where. Use the above as said by WernerCD, you will achieve what you want. Don't Use STATIC Variables unless and until if it really necessary as the keyword STATIC has lot of significance. –  msbyuva Feb 2 '11 at 14:47

It depends on the scenario. But ideally, Form elements are passed to any functions that will need to use them.

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Make the variable static. Then you can call it like Form1.MyVariable.

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4  
Might answer the question, but sounds like the beginning of a really bad design to me. –  ho1 Feb 2 '11 at 14:25
    
tried making it "static int MyVariable;", class1.cs wont' recognize Form1.MyVariable :( –  Rob Feb 2 '11 at 14:26
2  
@ho1 instead of InversionOfControl this is LoD=leack of design ;) –  Felice Pollano Feb 2 '11 at 14:31
    
@Rob: Define "won't recognize." Is there an error? Is the value not present? If the latter, how is the value being set? –  David Feb 2 '11 at 14:32
    
@Rob: You need it to be public static int MyVariable. –  Neil Knight Feb 2 '11 at 14:32

Try like this:

In case (1) you can have MyClass.MyInt private readonly.

public class MyForm : System.Windows.Forms.Form
{
    int myInt;

    public MyForm()
    {
        myInt = 1;

        //1
        var myClass = new MyClass(myInt);

        //2
        myClass.MyInt = myInt;
    }
}

public class MyClass
{
    public int MyInt { get; set; }

    public MyClass(int myInt)
    {
        MyInt = myInt;
    }
}
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You have a few options:

  1. Pass the value to the class/method that's using it. This is the preferred scenario. If your class depends on this value, supply the value to the class. Don't make the class go looking for it. (See: Dependency Inversion Principle)
  2. Make the value static. Then any other class can refer to that value. Note the difference between instance and static, of course. The value will always be the same and needs to be given in the definition of the member, not in a constructor or other logic.
  3. Create an instance of the form (which is itself just a class) within the class and access the public member on that instance. This is unlikely to be what you want because the instance you're creating isn't the instance that's running "on the page." (It also violates the principle noted above.)
  4. Pass a reference to the form (this) to the class and refer to the member from that reference.

On a side note, you'll want to get in the habit of making your public members properties instead of variables. In most cases, the property will likely just get/set the variable and nothing more. However, if something more ever needs to be added it can be done so without breaking compatibility. Changing a variable to a property changes the footprint of the class and breaks things which use that class.

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what could be for my issue? stackoverflow.com/questions/15677629/… –  Volatil3 Mar 28 '13 at 9:30

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