Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to get the present working directory in ubuntu using the following code:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<sys/syscall.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main(){
    char *str = malloc(100);
    str=(char *)   syscall(SYS_getcwd);
    printf("%s",str);
    return 0;
}

However, I am getting a segmentation fault and am unable to print the pwd. Kindly help me what is the right way to use sys_getcwd

share|improve this question
    
Are you really trying to use SYS_getcwd (if so, why?) or do you want to use the POSIX getcwd() function? –  janneb Feb 2 '11 at 15:20
    
this looks like a homework problem to me! –  TimeToCodeTheRoad Feb 4 '11 at 17:45

3 Answers 3

This is wrong, wrong wrong.

First off, why do you malloc 100 bytes if you aren't going to use that memory space? First you assign the str pointer to malloc'd space, then you reassign it to the return value of SYS_getcwd.

Second, how do you imagine a system call returning a string would work? In your current setup, you must imagine it allocating its own memory somewhere and returning a pointer to you. Ask yourself, "Why would it do that?"

What method do most C functions use to return a string?

Hint: You should pass the pointer to your buffer to the system call. Then it will write the response into the buffer. The returned value is a status or error code.

Hint #2: You should read the documentation! What is the second parameter that you should pass to the system call?

share|improve this answer
    
Okay. 'char *str = malloc(100); syscall(SYS_getcwd(str,99));' This is what i did based on your suggestion. But i get error called object ‘79’ is not a function –  user465983 Feb 2 '11 at 15:51
    
@user465983: That is because you still haven't read the documentation. How does the syscall() function work? –  Zan Lynx Feb 2 '11 at 16:06

If you want use getcwd function, this a little example:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main(){
    char *str = (char *)malloc(100);

        if(str){
            if ( getcwd(str, 99) == str)
                printf("%s\n", str);
            free(str);
        }

        return 0;
}

Well, the same thing with your example:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<sys/syscall.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main(){
    char *str = malloc(100);
    if (syscall(SYS_getcwd, str) == 0)
        printf("%s",str);

    free(str);
    return 0;
}

In this page you can read a manpage of syscall function: http://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/online/pages/man2/syscall.2.html

How you can see, first argument is syscall number, and in this case the second argument e is your string where syscall function put the value.

share|improve this answer
    
I know that above. Pls tell me how to use syscall version –  user465983 Feb 2 '11 at 15:53
    
Thanks this works. but the manpage does NOT say anywhere that in order to use SYS_getcwd the second parameter should be a string. How did you figure that out? –  user465983 Feb 2 '11 at 16:01
    
by the way, why do you use getwed(str, 99) and not 100? –  user465983 Feb 4 '11 at 6:09

You have a reason, in this page don't show the other arguments.

See this: http://asm.sourceforge.net/syscall.html

and look sys_getcwd(char *buf, unsigned long size). the syscall function takes the syscall and his arguments. In this example, sys_getcwd have two arguments, buffer to put value, and size of the buffer. In my first example I forgot parameter "size".

Do you understand?

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry but the above answer is wrong. sys_getcws in not a function. –  user465983 Feb 4 '11 at 6:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.