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Is there an equivalent of this in C# for static members?

I like to use this to make my code more readable, but wondered if there was an equivalent for static members.

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Thank you all for your answers.I appreciate now that the simple answer to this questions is 'no', but my point was to find out if there was a way of distinguishing between a static member belonging to the class you're working in or a member of another class. My conclusion is that, stylistically, it would be best to use the class name when working in another class (a prerequisite anyway) and no class name when in the class itself. I shall award the answer to @AakashM for the prompt and exhaustive (or exhausting) explanation. :-) –  Moose Factory Feb 10 '11 at 9:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I suppose if you use this. to reinforce that you are referring to instance members, the equivalent in a static member would be to use ClassName.

But stylistically, why add code that doesn't change meaning?


edit to add various clarifications:

My last sentence above can be illustrated with these examples:

class Example1
{
    public int J { get; set; }

    public Example1()
    {
        J = 0;
    }

    // These two methods have *exactly* the same CIL
    public int InstanceMethodLong()
    {
        return this.J;
    }

    public int InstanceMethodShort()
    {
        return J;
    }
}

The this. in InstanceMethodLong does not change the meaning as compared with InstanceMethodShort.

Statically:

class Example2
{
    public static int K { get; set; }

    static Example2()
    {
        K = 0;
    }

    // These two methods have *exactly* the same CIL
    public int StaticMethodLong()
    {
        return Example2.K;
    }

    public int StaticMethodShort()
    {
        return K;
    }

The Example2. in StaticMethodLong does not change the meaning as compared with StaticMethodShort.

In both these cases, adding the qualifier results in the same CIL, the same behaviour, and is more source to write, read, and understand. Stylistically - and I will happily accept that this is a question of code style - I see no reason for it to be there.


With underscore prefixes the situation is slightly different:

class Example3
{
    int _j;

    public int J
    {
        get { return _j; }
        set
        {
            _j = value;
            // and do something else,
            // to justify not using an auto-property 
        }
    }

    public Example3()
    {
        J = 0;
    }

    public int MethodWithParameter(int j)
    {
        // Now there is a *difference* between
        return j;

        // and
        return _j;
    }
}

Here, in MethodWithParameter, there is a difference between referring to _j and j - so we are deliberately and explicitly expressing different meaning. It's true that the compiler doesn't care what we call our variable names, but it does care what variables we are referring to! So in the body of MethodWithParameter, using or not using an underscore isn't just stylistic, it's semantic. Which isn't the particular issue we're addressing in this question.

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7  
It might change the meaning to the maintainer of the code. The compiler doesn't care one way or the other. –  Eric Lippert Feb 2 '11 at 15:09
    
Is there a way to make this type-unaware a la 'selftype.name'? (i.e. if I want to rename my class) –  xtofl Feb 2 '11 at 15:12
    
@Eric I indeed agree that "code should be primarily written for people and only incidentally for computers" - BUT we're at the top of a very slippery slope - I'd prefer to aim to be in a place where my fellow maintainers understand my intent in exactly the same way as the compiler does, rather than catering for incomplete understanding in my fellow maintainers. What's next, "avoid LINQ because some people find it confusing" ? –  AakashM Feb 2 '11 at 15:13
    
@xtofl Certainly with ReSharper, such references will get changed as part of a class rename. I think the native VS 2010 rename refactoring also does this. –  AakashM Feb 2 '11 at 15:15
    
@xtofl If you use a proper refactoring tool, it will already do that work for you. –  Michael Kjörling Feb 2 '11 at 15:16

As a static member is not meant to belong to any particular instance (as this refers to an instance of an object, with different settings possible per instance), what you would instead want to do is use ClassName.Member instead of this.Member.

public class Orange
{
    public static string Tastes = "sweet";

    public static string FoodType(){
        return "fruit";
    }
}

Would be called by:

Console.WriteLine(Orange.Tastes);

Same goes for static methods, as well:

Console.WriteLine(Orange.FoodType()).

Please note this is a contrived example for demonstration only. :)

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You may able to use the class name to reference other static properties.

Your code becomes a bit more resistant to copy/paste but that's not always a bad thing.

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Unfortunately no, there is no this for static methods. To help differentiate static members from class members I prefix it with the class name.

class Test {
  static Regex TextRegex = new Regex(...);

  public static bool TestString(string input) {
    return Test.TextRegex.IsMatch(input);
  }
}
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I like "this" as well to realsie from the first look where the state is changing. You may want to consider type's name for static members in this case.

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