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Why is:

(CheckBox)lstControls.Where(x => x.ID == "some_id").SingleOrDefault();

not as efficient as:

(CheckBox)lstControls.SingleOrDefault(x => x.ID == "some_id");

And for a not-so-well-formed XML document and you only know the name of the element you are looking for is this the best statement you can use to find the element:

var xmlElem = (from n in xDocument.Descendants() where (string)n.Attribute("name") == "some_node_name" select n).SingleOrDefault();

Thanks....

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I'm not mistaken, in terms of big O efficiency, it's the same. It's just an extra method call.

Regarding the second question,

var xmlElem = (from n in xDocument.Descendants() where (string)n.Attribute("name") == "some_node_name" select n).SingleOrDefault();

can be expressed more simply as

var xmlElem = xDocument.Descendants().SingleOrDefault(n => (string)n.Attribute("name") == "some_node_name");
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Shit, I didn't know SOD had overloads. into the toolbox! – Will Jan 28 '09 at 15:01
(CheckBox)lstControls.Where(x => x.ID == "some_id").SingleOrDefault();

This must test every item in the enumeration.

(CheckBox)lstControls.SingleOrDefault(x => x.ID == "some_id");

This can stop testing items and return as soon as it finds something.

If you have a very large enumeration, and an item near the front satisfies the condition, then the former may be significantly faster. In the case where the number of items satisfying the condition increases with the size of the enumeration, the speedup may be asymptotic. For instance, if one out of every k items on average satisfies the condition, then the average run time of the second snippet is constant.

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'This can stop testing items and return as soon as it finds something.' This is not true - SingleOrDefault throws an exception when collection contains more then one element, so it can't stop iterating on first matched element. That is how First/FirstOrDefault works. – MarcinJuraszek Jun 12 '12 at 18:04

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