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I have a control which I have to make large modifications to. I'd like to completely prevent it from redrawing while I do that - SuspendLayout and ResumeLayout aren't enough. How do I suspend painting for a control and its children?

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2  
can someone please explain me what is drawing or painting here in this context? (i am new to .net) atleast provide a link. –  Mr_Green Oct 18 '12 at 16:56

7 Answers 7

up vote 152 down vote accepted

At my previous job we struggled with getting our rich UI app to paint instantly and smoothly. We were using standard .Net controls, custom controls and devexpress controls.

After a lot of googling and reflector usage I came across the WM_SETREDRAW win32 message. This really stops controls drawing whilst you update them and can be applied, IIRC to the parent/containing panel.

This is a very very simple class demonstrating how to use this message:

class DrawingControl
{
    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    public static extern int SendMessage(IntPtr hWnd, Int32 wMsg, bool wParam, Int32 lParam);

    private const int WM_SETREDRAW = 11; 

    public static void SuspendDrawing( Control parent )
    {
        SendMessage(parent.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, false, 0);
    }

    public static void ResumeDrawing( Control parent )
    {
        SendMessage(parent.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, true, 0);
        parent.Refresh();
    }
}

There are fuller discussions on this - google for C# and WM_SETREDRAW, e.g.

C# Jitter

Suspending Layouts

And to whom it may concern, this is similar example in VB:

Declare Function SendMessage Lib "user32" Alias "SendMessageA" (ByVal hWnd As Integer, _
                                                                ByVal wMsg As Integer, _
                                                                ByVal wParam As Integer,
                                                                ByVal lParam As Integer) As Integer

Private Const WM_SETREDRAW As Integer = 11

' Extension methods for Control
<Extension()>
Public Sub ResumeDrawing(ByVal Target As Control, ByVal Redraw As Boolean)
  SendMessage(Target.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, 1, 0)
  If Redraw Then
    Target.Refresh()
  End If
End Sub

<Extension()>
Public Sub SuspendDrawing(ByVal Target As Control)
  SendMessage(Target.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, 0, 0)
End Sub

<Extension()>
Public Sub ResumeDrawing(ByVal Target As Control)
  ResumeDrawing(Target, True)
End Sub
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18  
What a great answer and a tremendous help! I made SuspendDrawing and ResumeDrawing extension methods for the Control class, so I can call them for any control in any context. –  Zach Johnson Mar 27 '09 at 20:56
1  
Had a tree-like control that would only refresh a node properly on rearranging its children if you collapsed then expanded it, which led to ugly flickering. This worked perfectly to get around it. Thanks! (Amusingly enough, the control already imported SendMessage, and defined WM_SETREDRAW, but didn't actually use it for anything. Now it does.) –  neminem Jun 1 '11 at 22:22
4  
This isn't particularly useful. This is exactly what the Control base class for all of the WinForms controls already does for the BeginUpdate and EndUpdate methods. Sending the message yourself is no better than using those methods to do the heavy lifting for you, and certainly can't produce different results. –  Cody Gray Jun 4 '11 at 2:05
3  
@Cody Gray -- TableLayoutPanels don't have BeginUpdate, for example. –  TheBlastOne Jun 7 '11 at 11:52
3  
@Cody Gray - Neither does Panel. Very useful code. –  Robert Jeppesen Dec 2 '11 at 9:49

The following is the same solution of ng5000 but doesn't use P/Invoke.

public static class SuspendUpdate
{
    private const int WM_SETREDRAW = 0x000B;

    public static void Suspend(Control control)
    {
        Message msgSuspendUpdate = Message.Create(control.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, IntPtr.Zero,
            IntPtr.Zero);

        NativeWindow window = NativeWindow.FromHandle(control.Handle);
        window.DefWndProc(ref msgSuspendUpdate);
    }

    public static void Resume(Control control)
    {
        // Create a C "true" boolean as an IntPtr
        IntPtr wparam = new IntPtr(1);
        Message msgResumeUpdate = Message.Create(control.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, wparam,
            IntPtr.Zero);

        NativeWindow window = NativeWindow.FromHandle(control.Handle);
        window.DefWndProc(ref msgResumeUpdate);

        control.Invalidate();
    }
}
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I've tried it, but in intermediate stage between Suspend and Resume, it's just invalidate. It may sound weird, but can it just hold its state before suspend in the transient state? –  user Sep 17 '12 at 9:30
1  
Suspend a control means that no drawing will be performed at all in the control area and you may get leftovers drawn from other windows/controls in that surface. You may try to use a control with DoubleBuffer set to true if you want the previous "state" to be drawn until the control is resumed (if I understood what you meant), but I can't guarantee that it will work. Anyway I think you are missing the point of using this technique: it's meant to avoid the user seeing a progressive and slow drawing of objects (better to see all of them appearing together). For other needs, use other techniques. –  ceztko Sep 25 '12 at 17:16
    
Nice answer, but it would be much better to show where Message and NativeWindow are; searching documentation for a class named Message is not really all that entertaining. –  pelesl May 4 at 17:04
    
I call these functions on a form or tab page full of text boxes and the text boxes don't get painted after the call to control.Invalidate(). These calls seem to have some unintended consequences, because the GotFocus events are not firing in those text boxes if the control containing them is passed to your Suspend function. –  pelesl May 4 at 17:14
    
@pelesl 1) use automatic namespace import (click on symbol, ALT+Shift+F10), 2) children not being painted by Invalidate() is the expected behavior. You should suspend the parent control only for a short time span and resume it when all the relevant children are invalidated. –  ceztko May 4 at 20:55

I usually use a little modified version of ngLink' answer.

public class MyControl : Control
{
    private int suspendCounter = 0;

    private void SuspendDrawing()
    {
        if(suspendCounter == 0) 
            SendMessage(this.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, false, 0);
        suspendCounter++;
    }

    private void ResumeDrawing()
    {
        suspendCounter--; 
        if(suspendCounter == 0) 
        {
            SendMessage(this.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, true, 0);
            this.Refresh();
        }
    }
}

This allows suspend/resume calls to be nested. You must make sure to match each SuspendDrawing with a ResumeDrawing. Hence, it wouldn't probably be a good idea to make them public.

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1  
This helps to keep both calls balanced: SuspendDrawing(); try { DrawSomething(); } finally { ResumeDrawing(); }. Another option is to implement this in a IDisposable class and to enclose the drawing part in a using-statement. The handle would be passed to the constructor, which would suspend drawing. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jul 4 at 20:32

A nice solution without using interop:

As always, simply enable DoubleBuffered=true on your CustomControl. Then, if you have any containers like FlowLayoutPanel or TableLayoutPanel, derive a class from each of these types and in the constructors, enable double buffering. Now, simply use your derived Containers instead of the Windows.Forms Containers.

class TableLayoutPanel : System.Windows.Forms.TableLayoutPanel
{
    public TableLayoutPanel()
    {
        DoubleBuffered = true;
    }
}

class FlowLayoutPanel : System.Windows.Forms.FlowLayoutPanel
{
    public FlowLayoutPanel()
    {
        DoubleBuffered = true;
    }
}
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1  
That's certainly a useful technique - one which I use quite often for ListViews - but it doesn't actually prevent the redraws from happening; they still happen offscreen. –  Simon Mar 11 '10 at 9:36
3  
You are right, it solves the flickering problem, not the off-screen redrawing problem specifically. When I was looking for a solution to the flickering, I came accross several related threads like this one, and when I found it, I might not have posted it in the most relevant thread. However, when most people want to suspend painting, they are probably referring to painting on-screen, which is often a more obvious problem than redundant off-screen painting, so I still think that other viewers might find this solution helpful in this thread. –  Eugenio De Hoyos Mar 11 '10 at 19:19

Here is a combination of ceztko's and ng5000's to bring a VB extensions version that doesn't use pinvoke

Imports System.Runtime.CompilerServices

Module ControlExtensions

Dim WM_SETREDRAW As Integer = 11

''' <summary>
''' A stronger "SuspendLayout" completely holds the controls painting until ResumePaint is called
''' </summary>
''' <param name="ctrl"></param>
''' <remarks></remarks>
<Extension()>
Public Sub SuspendPaint(ByVal ctrl As Windows.Forms.Control)

    Dim msgSuspendUpdate As Windows.Forms.Message = Windows.Forms.Message.Create(ctrl.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, System.IntPtr.Zero, System.IntPtr.Zero)

    Dim window As Windows.Forms.NativeWindow = Windows.Forms.NativeWindow.FromHandle(ctrl.Handle)

    window.DefWndProc(msgSuspendUpdate)

End Sub

''' <summary>
''' Resume from SuspendPaint method
''' </summary>
''' <param name="ctrl"></param>
''' <remarks></remarks>
<Extension()>
Public Sub ResumePaint(ByVal ctrl As Windows.Forms.Control)

    Dim wparam As New System.IntPtr(1)
    Dim msgResumeUpdate As Windows.Forms.Message = Windows.Forms.Message.Create(ctrl.Handle, WM_SETREDRAW, wparam, System.IntPtr.Zero)

    Dim window As Windows.Forms.NativeWindow = Windows.Forms.NativeWindow.FromHandle(ctrl.Handle)

    window.DefWndProc(msgResumeUpdate)

    ctrl.Invalidate()

End Sub

End Module
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2  
I am working w/a WPF app that uses winforms intermixed with the wpf forms, and dealing with screen flicker. I am confused in how this code should be leveraged - would this go in the winform or wpf window? Or is this not suited for my particular situation? –  nocarrier Dec 18 '12 at 1:29

Quick way: if your DataTable is not too large, simply isolate DataGridView.DataSource to a copy of your datatable by:

dataGridView1.DataSource = yourDataTable.Copy();

Now do changes to yourDataTable.

After, resume the connection by:

dataGridView1.DataSource = yourDataTable;
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Or just use Control.SuspendLayout() and Control.ResumeLayout().

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4  
Layout and Painting are two different thing: layout is how child controls are arranged in their container. –  Larry Sep 22 '13 at 16:09

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