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Suppose I have an ExecutorService (which can be a thread pool, so there's concurrency involved) which executes a task at various times, either periodically or in response to some other condition. The task to be executed is the following:

  • if this task is already in progress, do nothing (and let the previously-running task finish).
  • if this task is not already in progress, run Algorithm X, which can take a long time.

I'm trying to think of a way to implement this. It should be something like:

Runnable task = new Runnable() {
   final SomeObj inProgress = new SomeObj();
   @Override public void run() {
       if (inProgress.acquire())
       {
          try
          {
             algorithmX();
          }
          finally
          {
             inProgress.release();
          }
       }
   }
}

// re-use this task object whenever scheduling the task with the executor

where SomeObj is either a ReentrantLock (acquire = tryLock() and release = unlock()) or an AtomicBoolean or something, but I'm not sure which. Do I need a ReentrantLock here? (Maybe I want a non-reentrant lock in case algorithmX() causes this task to be run recursively!) Or would an AtomicBoolean be enough?


edit: for a non-reentrant lock, is this appropriate?

Runnable task = new Runnable() {
   boolean inProgress = false;
   final private Object lock = new Object();
   /** try to acquire lock: set inProgress to true, 
    *  return whether it was previously false
    */ 
   private boolean acquire() {
      synchronized(this.lock)
      {
         boolean result = !this.inProgress;
         this.inProgress = true;
         return result;
      }
   }
   /** release lock */
   private void release() {
      synchronized(this.lock)
      {
         this.inProgress = false;
      }
   }
   @Override public void run() {
       if (acquire())
       {
          // nobody else is running! let's do algorithmX()
          try
          {
             algorithmX();
          }
          finally
          {
             release();
          }
       }
       /* otherwise, we are already in the process of 
        * running algorithmX(), in this thread or in another,
        * so don't do anything, just return control to the caller.
        */
   }
}
share|improve this question
    
A recommendation: rather than presenting some complex code and asking someone to validate it, try it yourself and then, if you encounter behavior you don't understand, ask a specific question. –  Jim Garrison Feb 2 '11 at 17:14
    
thanks... It's not that I'm looking to validate code, it's that I have a situation where I need to run a task serially in a multithreaded system, and I'm not sure how to implement it correctly in the face of concurrency issues. The code I presented is merely an attempt at an example. If I should be using an existing class instead, I'd like to know that, because I'm fumbling around with what precise question to ask. –  Jason S Feb 2 '11 at 17:17
1  
My experience with concurrency issues, is that while you can try code to see if there are obvious bugs, you can't just try it to check whether it succeeds, because there may be bizarre improbable corner conditions that will show your program is incorrect, and it may not be possible to reproduce those conditions on demand. –  Jason S Feb 2 '11 at 17:22
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/3205231/… –  finnw Feb 3 '11 at 19:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The lock implementation you suggest is weak in the sense that it would be quite easy for someone to use it improperly.

Below is a much more efficient implementation with the same improper use weaknesses as your implementation:

   AtomicBoolean inProgress = new AtomicBoolean(false)
   /* Returns true if we acquired the lock */
   private boolean acquire() {
       return inProgress.compareAndSet(false, true);
   }
   /** Always release lock without determining if we in fact hold it */
   private void release() {
       inProgress.set(false);
   }
share|improve this answer
    
"When your acquire method returns true that means someone else has the lock already and you in fact failed to get the lock." nope -- read the code again, I inverted the old existing value. But you have a much simpler implementation, thanks! –  Jason S Feb 2 '11 at 18:30
    
@Jason S, yeah, sorry didn't see that. Still, CAS operations > synchronizing –  Tim Bender Feb 2 '11 at 19:29
    
Can you explain a bit more what you mean by "it would be quite easy for someone to use [the code] improperly"? –  user359996 Feb 2 '11 at 20:33
1  
@user359996, this implementation releases the lock unconditionally when release is called. Technically that meets the requirement of the Lock interface, but the design consideration to check the calling thread is (IMO) an important one. –  Tim Bender Feb 3 '11 at 0:53

Your first bit of code looks pretty good, but if you're worried about algorithmX recursively invoking the task, I would suggest you use a java.util.concurrent.Semaphore as the synchronization object, rather than a ReentrantLock. For example:

Runnable task = new Runnable() {
   final Semaphore lock = new Semaphore( 1 );
   @Override public void run() {
       if (lock.tryAcquire())
       {
          try
          {
             algorithmX();
          }
          finally
          {
             lock.release();
          }
       }
   }
}

Note in particular the use of tryacquire. If acquiring the lock fails, algorithmX is not run.

share|improve this answer

ReentrantLock seems fine to me. The only situation where I'd find interesting to manually create a lock using AtomicInteger will be if you have a really short algorithmX which is not your case.

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The problem with ReentrantLock is that the OP is concerned that algorithmX may trigger execution of the task while it is already running. –  user359996 Feb 3 '11 at 22:39

I think the secret of choosing the right lock impl is this: * if this task is already in progress, do nothing (and let the previously-running task finish).

What does "do nothing" mean in this context? Thread should block and retry execution after running algorithmX is finished?. If this is the case semaphore.acquire instead of tryAcquire should be used and AtomicBoolean solution won't work as expected.

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