Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a C# form application...i created a Dll...now i want to launch that dll using this program. how do i do it?

#include <windows.h>

typedef int (*function1_ptr) ();

function1_ptr function1=NULL;

int APIENTRY WinMain(HINSTANCE, HINSTANCE, LPSTR, int) { 

HMODULE myDll = LoadLibrary("Dll1.dll"); 

    if(myDll!=NULL) {  
        function1 = (function1_ptr) GetProcAddress(myDll,"function1");  

        if(function1!=NULL)  
            function1();
        else
            exit(4);

        FreeLibrary(myDll);
    }
    else
        exit(6);
    GetLastError();

    return 0;
}

This was the code used to test my dll...i.e Dll1.dll..function1 was the function within dll1.dll.....can i do something similar with the C# code???

share|improve this question
4  
what are you calling "launching" a DLL ? A dll is a container for class. There is no entry point in a dll. –  Steve B Feb 2 '11 at 16:43
    
to call the DLL using this program....in order to see whether the DLL works or not ...i had tried a code which calls the DLL ...which helped me figure out that the DLL worked –  Vinod K Feb 2 '11 at 16:48
1  
what do you mean by "whether the dll works or not" how do you define working? Every function in the dll? Just a certain one? There's no such thing as running a dll. –  Davy8 Feb 2 '11 at 16:51
1  
Your question implies some kind of dynamic loading an invoking a dll from a consumer process, which is not the same as simply referencing your assembly and then using it from your code. It's design time vs runtime. You should be more specific with the stuff you ask. –  dexter Feb 2 '11 at 16:52
1  
this is rather vague, I suspect you mean 'how do I execute a function from an external C library?' and perhaps 'how do I load a c library dynamically at runtime?' –  IanNorton Mar 31 '11 at 18:32

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To do what your code example does, use the following C# code:

public static class DllHelper
{
    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("Dll1.dll")]
    public static extern int function1();
}

private void buttonStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        DllHelper.function1();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
    }
}      

The above example is a C# program that calls a function in non .NET based DLL. The example below is a C# program that calls a function in a .NET based DLL.

try
{
    System.Reflection.Assembly dll1 = System.Reflection.Assembly.LoadFile("Dll1.dll");
    if (dll1 != null)
    {
        object obj = dll1.CreateInstance("Function1Class");
        if (obj != null)
        {
            System.Reflection.MethodInfo mi = obj.GetType().GetMethod("function1");
            mi.Invoke(obj, new object[0]);
        }
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
}

Is any of the the 2 examples what you want? Or are you trying to call a C# function in a DLL from your example code?

share|improve this answer

I assume you want to use the functionality of the DLL? If so, create a reference to the DLL and consume it in your C# forms application. In other words, create a "user" interface for application logic contained in a DLL. If this does not make sense, you should look up how to add a reference to a project.

share|improve this answer

Make your dll executable and after that use the Process class from diagnostics:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.diagnostics.process.aspx

            Process myProcess = new Process();

            try
            {
                myProcess.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
                // You can start any process, HelloWorld is a do-nothing example.
                myProcess.StartInfo.FileName = "C:\\HelloWorld.exe";
                myProcess.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
                myProcess.Start();
                // This code assumes the process you are starting will terminate itself. 
                // Given that is is started without a window so you cannot terminate it 
                // on the desktop, it must terminate itself or you can do it programmatically
                // from this application using the Kill method.
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
            }
share|improve this answer

The terms launching and DLL are somewhat incompatible concepts. The operating system launches programs which are binaries that have a defined entry point: the main method. DLLs are better viewed as binaries which have multiple entry points in the form of APIs. Launching in this case would require the operating system to pick between these many entry points.

Were you trying to use a particular object from a DLL? If so then try the following

  • Right click on the project in "Solution Explorer" and select "Add Reference"
  • Choose the "Browse" Tab
  • Navigate to the DLL in question and hit OK

Now you will be able to use the types from the DLL within your project.

MyOtherDLLNamespace.TheType local = ...
share|improve this answer

You could do this for an exe:

   Process.Start("yourProcess");

You could also use the AppDomain object if you want to load a dll into your process and then consume it.

And finally you can use the

  Assembly.Load(...) 

Each serves its own purpose and I would suggest to read up on all of them on msdn for starters.

share|improve this answer

Add the DLL as a reference to your form application. Then you'll be able to access the namespaces and classes in it from the application code.

share|improve this answer

In your C# application, add a reference to the assembly you created (the DLL). You can do this through the solution explorer window - right click on references, and say "Add Reference..." and choose your DLL.

At that point, you can add "using YourDllNamespace;" at the top of your C# form's class, and use the types defined within the DLL as needed.

share|improve this answer

You can use different methods, one is

Assembly.Load 

another is using a DllImport attribute:

[DllImport("mylib.dll)]
share|improve this answer

You can add reference to that dll into your project.

To add reference use following STEPS:

1.Go to Project Menu or Solution Explorer
2. add reference
3. browse your dll
4. OK

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.