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Is there an efficiency preference for one of the following control flow options for use in a loop or switch over the other?

Option 1:

switch(...){
    case 1:
        if (...) { ... }
        else if (...) { ... }
        else if (...) { ... }
        .
        .
        .
        else if (...) { ... }
        break;
    case 2:
    .
    .
    .
}

Option 2:

switch(...){
    case 1:
        if (...) { ... break; }
        if (...) { ... break; }
        .
        .
        .
        if (...) { ... break; }
    case 2:
    .
    .
    .
}
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1  
Break is not really sensible in an if statement all by itself. It's only really sensible in a loop. Without showing the containing loop, the example is a tiny bit misleading. –  S.Lott Feb 2 '11 at 16:48
1  
@S.Lott - Notably, the question explicitly states "for use in a loop or switch" –  Charles Duffy Feb 2 '11 at 16:49
1  
@Charles Duffy. Yes, but. An if inside a switch with buried break statements is extremely complex. A better example would help. A loop sometimes has extra processing at the top or bottom. It helps to clarify that also. Some of us aren't quite so brilliant and like more complete examples. –  S.Lott Feb 2 '11 at 16:51
    
@s.lott @charles: thanks for comments guys. updated the example to make it a little more clear. also, feel free to edit –  allen Feb 2 '11 at 17:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. Any sane compiler will generate to the same output (assembly, bytecode, etc). for both.

You can demonstrate this using gcc -S to generate assembly for both versions.

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You need something that is unambiguous.

One break per case reduces ambiguity.

Multiple break buried inside if-else inside a switch is a recipe for a disaster when one of those break's get omitted.

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good point. though i asked about efficiency, i was hoping people would give their coding advice generally as well. thx –  allen Feb 2 '11 at 18:20
    
I was talking about efficiency. It's inefficient to try and maintain or adapt code where the break s don't match the case s. –  S.Lott Feb 2 '11 at 19:08

You could double-check assembly output in particular specific cases to be sure, but I expect that any modern compiler will produce the same code most of the time.

However, I'd prefer the first form for readability, because a chain of if/else if/else blocks more clearly indicates to me (at least) that the options are mutually exclusive whereas a series of disjoint if statements implies to me that the options might not be mutually exclusive. But that's just my subjective judgement on the style.

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I suppose technically option 1 for space and option 2 for speed, but any modern compiler will likely optimize the difference away and even if it didn't, the difference is likely to be minuscule. Unless you are in a severely restrictive environment where every byte or instruction cycle counts and your compiler is very simplistic, you may be better in the long run avoiding micro optimizations and code for readability and maintainability.

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if possible i would recommend the switch statement

  switch (expr) {
     case c1:
        //TODO
        break;
     case c2: 
        //TODO
        break;

     . . .
     default:
        //TODO
  }

at long if else statements this will be faster...

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